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USM Popular Queries - Wed, 2015-02-18 09:01

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USM Popular Queries - Tue, 2015-02-17 09:01

Girls don’t appreciate creepy pickup strategies: Female students share their worst bar stories

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2015-02-10 14:45

Bar and clubs are usually the stereotypical hot spots to pick up women and with Valentine’s Day around the corner, the nightlife in Portland is sure to be filled with thirsty dudes looking for some last minute love. But how do women feel about that?

Based on the experiences of several female students the general consensus is grim: a good portion of men are over-aggressive creeps when it comes to their strategies for scoring dates.

“I’m sure every girl has been hit on, one way or another, in a creepy fashion,” said Nicole Downing, a sophomore art major.

According to Downing, “creepy behavior,” can be anything from prolonged stares, the use of pickup lines, to unwanted touching and grabbing. From the accounts of female students, these behaviors happen far too often and can discourage girls from feeling comfortable in the dating scene.

“Men suck,” said Sarah Morrell, a marketing and business management graduate. “The best ones are either taken or gay.”

“Straight staring makes me uncomfortable,” said Andreanna Anderson, a former USM student. “One of the worst things is when a guy is just staring at me from across the bar.”

Anderson said that once while out in the Old Port, she had a random guy that she never met before come up to her and immediately start groping.

“He just walked up and grabbed my ass and casually walked away,” said Anderson. “I wouldn’t go into the bars looking for my future husband.”

Anderson considers this behavior disrespectful and attributes it to an overabundance of male confidence. Anderson is quick to point out these kind of men, because according to her they are usually the ones that will call you “babe,” or “sexy,” before even learning your name. For her, men that employ that tactic are an instant turn off.

“I really hate it when guys come at me super aggressively and over confident,” said Anderson. “I don’t like guys that think they are the hottest thing on the planet.”

Abby Kohle, a senior communication major, also has had some experience with aggressive men and said that only when she tells pursuers that she has a boyfriend, will they leave her alone.

“It’s really degrading because they’re not respecting me, they’re respecting my boyfriend,” said Kohle. “I know a lot of girls that lie about having a boyfriend just to get them to back off.”

As far as pet names, like “baby,” “sugar” and “sexy,” Kohle considers them all to be disgraceful. According to Kohle, if a man doesn’t ask for her name, or address her by her name, she ignores them. Kohle described the men that employ that kind of approach as cocky instead of genuinely confident.

“Confidence is something everyone should have inherently,” said Kohle. “But when you talk to a girl you should give her your attention, instead of making it all about you and getting her to like you.”

Pickup lines were cited as particularly cringe-worthy methods of seducing women by nearly all the women interviewed. Kohle finds them demeaning to her gender.

“I was at LFK once and met a guy outside while smoking a cigarette,” said Kohle. “The first thing he said was, ‘I’m Alec, a lot of people hate me.’ It was the worst pickup line ever.”

“[Pickup lines] work for men some of the time,” said Rachel Zahn, a music graduate. “I’ve always thought it was cheesy, but some girls who don’t get much attention go for it.”

Zahn thinks that crude, lewd and cheesy behavior might be because some men go through a lot of rejection and don’t know how else to act around women.

“Going through a lot of rejection isn’t even an excuse for the behavior,” said Zahn. “I’ve learned to not even put myself in those situations, it isn’t my duty to take responsibility for those actions.”

Despite the cheesiness of pickup lines, some girls enjoy them, but only if they’re humorous enough.

“I kind of like them because they make me chuckle,” said Anderson. “A sense of humor can go a long way with me.”

Rylee Doiron, a musical theatre graduate, told a bar story about a guy who improvised a line based on the drink that she ordered. The guy approached her, looked at her whiskey drink, and said ‘Lady after my own heart, drinks her scotch neat.’

“I had to give it to him that he paid attention to what I was drinking and found a common ground that we could easily make conversation from,” said Doiron. “My good experiences with guys at bars have only been when they actually notice me and say something that doesn’t have anything to do with my appearance.”

According to Doiron, as long as a man is respectful and treats her like a human being instead of just a piece of meat, then she’s more inclined to like them.

Men like Brandon Owens, a recreation and sports management graduate, and his friend Cody Rohde, a senior sports management major agree and understand that women usually have a “wall of caution” around them when talking to strangers.

“Girls are on their guard a bit more,” said Owen. “Men don’t know what it’s like on their end.”

Owens said that if somebody expresses disinterest in him at a bar, then he immediately stops flirting to avoid coming across as weird or creepy.

While Rohde spoke out against pick up lines and simply hitting on girls, he did say that he’s been persistent on occasion when trying to win a girl’s favor.

“I try to read the vibe a girl is throwing at me,” said Rohde. “If she says no in a serious manner, I’ll back off. But if it’s a playful no, then I might try to persist.”

Anderson offered some advice to anyone looking for a Valentine’s love within Portland’s bar and club scene and said to approach a girl and compliment her, but about something other than her physicality.

“If she’s wearing a nice dress, say something about it, because that girl probably spent a long time picking that dress out,” said Anderson. “All ladies love compliments.”

The lesser known history of Valentine’s Day

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2015-02-10 14:40

Over priced roses and heart shaped pieces of plastic have adorned department store shelves, signifying that the ancient fertility festival of Lupercalia is almost upon us. But of course, most modern Americans know it as Valentine’s Day.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 62% of American adults celebrated the holiday of love and romance last year, but how many are aware of its pagan and later Christian origins?

After stopping to ask this question to about 25 students in the Woodbury Campus Center last week, the air of uncertainty surrounding the holiday’s beginning was tangible. Most students responded with, “I think it has something to do with St. Valentine,” but not much else.

“It was a religious day right?” said Christina Cook, a first year social work graduate student. “Like St. Valentine did some stuff at one time. I’m sorry, I don’t really know.”

“The only thing that comes to my mind is baby cupid shooting arrows,” said freshman international business major Rona Sayed. “I don’t think most students have an idea about the religious foundings of certain holidays.”

Despite the cute and loving nature of the holiday in its current form, back in Roman times, it was a different sort of celebration. Lupercalia, as it was called back then, was celebrated by sacrificing animals and whipping naked women with their hides in a drunken revelry. The holiday didn’t get its name until 400 A.D. Pope Gelasius declared Feb. 14 the day to honor two men, both named Valentine, who were executed by the Romans 100 years prior. The Pope wanted a Christian holiday to honor the church but didn’t want to upset the then huge populace of pagans. So Pope Gelasius simply changed the name of Lupercalia to Valentine’s Day in homage to the two bishops who were imprisoned and tortured in Rome before they died as martyrs. However, according to the Roman Martyrology, there’s only one person listed as Saint Valentine.

By the medieval era of the late 1300s the holiday was first associated with love and romance, spurred on by the works of Geoffrey Chaucer and William Shakespeare. But according to Libby Bischof, a history professor at USM, the Valentine’s Day rituals and symbols that we’re used to didn’t really gain popularity until the 17th and 18th century. After Europe embraced the idea of sending each other Valentines, the tradition carried over to America.

“As you might imagine, the British colonists brought over the tradition of card exchange with them to the New World,” said Bischof.

Bischof collects vintage Valentine’s Day cards from the late 19th century for personal pleasure and for her history students to examine. Bischof said that it is evident from her historic collection where we get our classic symbols of cherubs, hearts, flowers and doves. The cards were highly ornate, with soft tones of pinks, reds and blues and layered with lace and images of Victorian era scenes.

“Much like the women of the time were overdressed with ruffles and lace, these Valentine’s Day cards were way overdone,” said Bischof. “But I love card exchange.”

Bischof said that people living in the Victorian era, which lasted from 1837-1901, were more sentimental than the current generation and spent their Valentine’s Day sending gifts and detailed artistic stationaries to not just their romantic desires, but also to their friends and family.

“Today the honor of ‘my Valentine’ is usually reserved for somebody’s boyfriend or girlfriend,” said Bischof. “Friendships were more intimate back then.”

From the pop up art work, to the romantic verses and handwritten notes to even the envelopes they were sent in, these messages of love followed a structured format, but without lacking in creativity and meaning.

“In the 1700s there were actual manuals and coded social behaviors on what you should put into a Valentine’s Day card,” said Bischof.

Even the direction and angle of the stamp carried some sort of sentiment and meaning. For example a crooked stamp might mean that your intentions are to transcend being friends and start courting.

The art of the handwritten note and the act of making things from scratch in general is something that Bischof believes has for the most part, taken a back seat in modern society.

“Times have changed,” said Bischof. “There’s no handmade touch anymore, when taking the time and sentiment is important. It would be a nice thing if we could do more of it, but it’s gone by the wayside a little, partially from laziness and partially the demands of our time.”

According to Bischof, Valentine’s Day rituals have altered to a point where the holiday is more commercialized and people feel pressured to spend a lot of their money fueling a billion dollar industry. And while according to U.S. Postal Service, 150 million Valentine’s Day cards were sent through the mail last year, most were mass produced.

“Nowadays I’m sure it’s more common to make a Facebook post and tag your significant other in it,” said Bischof. “There was more genuine caring behind the Victorian practices, that may have just been filtered out now.”

Emily Maynard, a community planning and development graduate, used to keep fostering the older card exchange tradition as an R.A. on campus by leaving Valentine’s Day cards under residents’ doors. She believes that handmaking a card and sending it through the mail shows a lot of initiative, but is simply a hobby for some people.

“But that card in the mail has definitely been almost phased out by modern society,” said Maynard. “My parent will send me a card. But I probably won’t send one back.”

“I might send out one card,” said Brandon Owens, a recreation and sports management graduate. “If I had time, I’d try to make something. Creativity does mean more.”

Owens and his friend Cody Rohde, fellow sports management major, said they plan on watching Netflix on Valentine’s Day and think that people view the holiday as just another “Hallmark holiday but don’t really understand it.”

Today the holiday has strayed far from its dark Roman origins and Victorian era days of highly cordial but sincere rituals, into a big, money churning business. According to CNN, two years ago Americans spent more than four billion dollars on just candy and roses and $18.6 billion overall, by the time the day of love appeared on the calendar.

However according to the same survey, 85% of men and women in America say sex is an important part of their Valentine’s Day celebrations, so modern observers of the holiday hanker back to some of their ancient roots.

 

First presidency finalist visits

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2015-02-10 14:34

The first of the three prospective USM presidents, Jose “Zito” Sartarelli, met with student leaders, faculty and staff Thursday to introduce himself and answer questions about his vision for USM.

“Job one is enrollment. You have to fix enrollment. Job two is fundraising. Fundraising takes time, three to five years,” Sartarelli said. “USM has great bones but absolutely needs a new vision.”

Throughout the day Sartarelli was vocally adamant about recruitment and getting enrollment up by marketing to students.

“That dream of ‘build it and they will come’ – that doesn’t work anymore, you have to go out and sell it,” said Sartarelli. “We have to sell abroad and nationally – make our classrooms more diverse.”

“I have coined a slogan already. ‘USM Rising.’ Rising enrollment. Rising community engagement,” Sartarelli said.

The student senate ate lunch with Sartarelli and were all concerned about what his take of the “metropolitan university model” would be. Sartarelli’s vision entails not just reaching out to local businesses but a global reach. He would like to raise our student population from hovering around 7,000 to 10,000 and have international students be 10% of that makeup.

“One thing is for sure, we have to get our numbers up, it doesn’t matter what a metropolitan university is,” Sartarelli said.

Sartarelli wants to use his diverse international background working for global companies such as Johnson & Johnson and Bristol-Myer Squid, running their Latin American and Asia-Pacific departments.

Sartarelli is currently West Virginia University’s Chief Global Officer and Milan Puskar Dean of the College of Business and Economics at West Virginia University. He grew up on a farm in Brazil and until the age of seven read by the light of a kerosene lamp. Sartarelli finished high school in Texas and is still close friends with his host family.

“I am the epitome of ‘It takes a village.’ I’ve been helped by a lot of people in my life,” Sartarelli said.

If he was president six months or two years ago, he was asked, would he have gutted the university of professors and courses? Sartarelli said he didn’t like to answer hypothetical questions but he did say when you have a university such as ours that has 75% of its money connected to people, someone will be affected.

“If enrollment doesn’t go up there’s going to be more cuts in the future,” said Sartarelli. “For the greater good of the entity, it takes some pain.”

Megean Bourgeois, an undergraduate voting member of the presidential search board, broached the question of firing tenured professors by voicemail. Sartarelli said there needs to be dignity when releasing professors.

“It’s the termination of a dream. It’s shocking. There needs to be dignity and it must be done face to face,” said Sartarelli.

 

President Flanagan donates half of his salary for scholarship funding

USM Free Press News Feed - Mon, 2015-02-09 11:32

President David Flanagan announced today that he will be donating half of his annual salary to the USM Foundation, pledging $100,000 to be put toward student scholarships.

“We understand how vital it is for all of us connected to USM–faculty, staff, administration, alumni and friends–to be engaged in supporting our students and strengthening our role in the wider metropolitan community,” said Flanagan in a press release distributed on Monday morning.

The donated funds will be used to provide students with immediate need-based scholarships and to create a new endowed fund called  the David and Kaye’ 73 Flanagan Scholarship Fund, named after Flanagan and his wife.

“Kaye and I both came from modest economic backgrounds, and we know first-hand how important scholarship financial assistance was to us personally,” said David Flanagan. “We’re committed to helping bring the opportunity of a college education into reach for more Maine families.”

“I am proud of my USM education and am happy to contribute to its ongoing mission of affordable quality education for families like ours,” added Kaye Flanagan.

According to the release, this donation was sparked by another substantial donation to USM.

Richard “Doc” Costello, former USM Athletic Director, and his wife Melissa Costello, former chair of the School of Education, have announced that they will bequeath $750,000  to the University of Southern Maine Foundation for improvements to the Costello Sports Complex, the Gorham campus athletics facility named after the couple.

“We are thrilled with this wonderful gift from Melissa and Doc Costello.  Between the two of them, they had a huge impact on USM during their careers, particularly in the School of Education, where they both had faculty appointments,” said Cecile Aitchison, president of the USM Foundation. “As a coach and a teacher, Doc supported students in and out of the classroom.”

 

parking map

USM Popular Queries - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:01

parking

USM Popular Queries - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:01

presidential search

USM Popular Queries - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:01

parking lots

USM Popular Queries - Fri, 2015-02-06 09:01

Consequences are yet to be set for the

USM Free Press News Feed - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:08

Consequences are yet to be set for the majority of students who haven’t completed the mandatory sexual assault prevention training.

In the middle of November an email was sent out to students, paired with a message on Maine Street, making students aware that the training must be completed. Originally, the training was supposed to be completed before the semester break, but due to lack of completion by a majority of students, no set deadline has been made at this time.

As of now, there are no repercussions for not completing the survey. However, Joy Pufhal, dean of students, believes that there will be consequences, consequences which the board of trustees are currently trying to determine.

“This is the next piece on our agenda,” Pufhal said.

Pufhal also believes that the consequences could be as severe as holds being placed on the student accounts that have failed to complete the assessment, meaning that registering for classes would be impossible until the training is completed.

The amount of people participating in the training is much less than the USM administration hoped. Sarah Holmes, assistant director of student life and diversity, thinks this could be due to the fact that students are only being reached through email and MaineStreet

“A lot of people don’t pay attention to that stuff,” said Holmes. “There has been a slight increase in the number of students participating since the beginning of the spring semester.”

Holmes also commented that there hasn’t been a strong enough effort to get the word around.

“We need other methods of reaching people and letting them know how important this is,” said Holmes.

According to Holmes, that includes putting a blurb in the News Flush, a poster campaign, or starting something on social media to reach more students.

Not only is the training mandatory, but Holmes believes that the training will educate those who may not have any idea that sexual assault and harassment can be a real concern in campus communities. Holmes also is hopeful that as more partake in the training, victims of sexual assault will be able to step forward and know who to turn to when they want to talk about what happened to them.

Library fines add up, lock student accounts

USM Free Press News Feed - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:07

Students collectively owe the Glickman library in Portland an estimated amount of $4,375 in overdue book charges, with 29 students blocked by student accounts because they owe more than $100.

According to the director of libraries David Nutty, once a book is two weeks overdue, it’s assumed lost and a “billed book policy” is started. The student is then charged $45 for the book, plus a $10 processing and billing fee. If the book is returned all the fees would be waived, if not the bill gets transferred to the student accounts office.

“Our goal is to get the book back, not to make money,” said Nutty. “After two weeks, it becomes an issue with student accounts.”

For 29 students, because of their overage charges, they remain blocked by the registrar, meaning they can’t sign up for classes, get transcripts or even graduate until they settle their debt.

“They either need to pay off the bill, return the book, or speak to us, before they can do business with the university again,” said Nutty. “Under some extenuating circumstances, we’ve let students off the hook in the past.”

Nutty said that the reasons behind students not returning books on time are as varied as the individuals themselves and that forgetfulness and neglect probably play a role.

“Some people frankly just come in and say they’ve lost the book, pay the fees and move on with their lives,” said Nutty.

Another source of expenditure for the library is the occasional theft of property. According to Nutty, there’s been an individual stealing books from the library on two separate occasions: once in January and then again back in July. Nutty said that based on the images captured by security camera footage, the two thefts were committed by the same person.

Earlier in January, the individual set off the alarm and ran from campus with about eight books. By the time the police got there, the individual was already gone.

There is no way to exit the library without passing through the security gate, which reads the magnetic strip embedded within books, in a similar fashion to the gates in retail stores.

“That was the only blatant theft we’ve had in recent times,” said Nutty. “It’s not really a big problem for us. We’ve had more cases of petty thefts like purses or bags missing than anything else.”

 

Presidential search committee chooses three finalists

USM Free Press News Feed - Wed, 2015-02-04 12:05

Three finalists have been selected by the University of Southern Maine Presidential Search Committee and were announced last week. The candidates will be on all campuses at separate times throughout February.

The search committee included members of the board of trustees, students, staff, faculty, the community, board of visitors and a designee of the Chancellor. According to an email sent out by Chris Quint, executive director of public affairs, the committee began its national search last October. With 80 applicant responses, this presidential search is one of the largest in the last decade for any position within the university system.

Dr. Harvey Kesselman, who will be visiting USM on February 2 and 3, is currently the Provost and Executive Vice President at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey.

The second candidate, Dr. Jose Sartarelli, is the Chief Global Officer and Milan Puskar Dean of the College of Business and Economics at West Virginia University. He will be visiting USM on February 5th and 6th.

The final second candidate, who will be visiting USM on February 9 and 10, is Dr. Glenn Cummings, who currently serves as the president of the University of Maine at Augusta.

Kesselman was nominated to the position and in his letter of intent, explained that the mission statement set forth by the search committee was one to be enthused about.

“[I] believe my leadership abilities, skills, proven expertise in higher education, professional qualifications and personal characteristics are consistent with those you seek in your next president,” said Kesselman.

He went on to explain that in his current role, he is responsible for managing a $75 million academic budget, serves 8,600 students as well as 8000 full and part-time faculty and staff, eight academic schools and several supporting divisions throughout the college.

“Working closely with the president and the board of trustees,” he explained, “I have been a transformational leader of Stockton.”

Dr. Jose Sartarelli, the second candidate to visit the university, expressed his interest in the position and explained that he was able to turn a “good college” into a “vibrant one” with the support of students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends.

“Together we have achieved all-time record fundraising, $30 million in four years, reached all-time record enrollment, 2,709 students versus 1,452 in 2010 and strengthened the financials of the college significantly, with $45 million in net assets versus $29 million in 2010.”

He went on to explain that they have expanded recruitment globally and now some particular programs have ranked globally.

Lastly, Dr. Glenn Cummings, will be visiting the campuses on February 9th and 10th.

In his letter of intent, Cummings explained, “Plainly said, I see this position from a deep-seated and well-informed belief in the power, importance and enormous potential of the University of Southern Maine.”

Despite significant recent struggles, he believes the university possesses all the assets necessary for a significant turnaround.

“My vision includes reshaping the University of Southern Maine into one of the most vibrant metropolitan universities in the country,” said Cummings. “I believe this is a vision that faculty, staff, students and community members share already as stakeholder.”

According to Cummings, with the right leadership, that vision is attainable.

In an email, Quint explained that following the campus visits the search committee will reconvene to consider community comments and finalize recommendations that will be forwarded to the University of Maine System Chancellor James Page. In the spring, the board of trustees will be asked to approve the Chancellor’s selection. The new president is expected to take office early this summer.

On Feb. 2, Kesselman will be having an open meeting with faculty from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00, with students from 1:15 to 2:00 and with staff from 2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in the Glickman Library Events Room on the seventh floor.

Winter storm shuts down USM, classes canceled three days in one week

USM Free Press News Feed - Wed, 2015-02-04 11:57

USM shut down its campuses, suspending classes and activities, three times last week, in response to a series of snowstorms that blanketed Portland with over two and a half feet of snow.

Bangor Daily News reported that the first storm, colloquially named “Juno” dumped two feet of snow in some Maine communities, while the second one left Portland with another 6-8 inches of accumulation.

On top of the accumulation, wind gusts of over 45 mph resulted in snow drifting from the side of the roads, reducing visibility and making travel conditions very dangerous. Many students, like the student body president Kyle Frazier, believed that it was wise for USM’s administration to heed the National Weather Services predictions and close school, especially on its exclusively commuter Portland campus.

“The cancellations were a good move,” said Frazier. “We have a high amount of commuter students and while attending class is important, it is also important that students are safe, especially when many of them travel a pretty far distance to attend class.”

Students like Chelsea Bard, a sophomore communication and media studies major and her friend Nicole Downing, a sophomore art major, agreed and said that while education is important, it’s not important enough to risk driving during a whiteout blizzard.

“It’s too bad that some people got to miss out on their classes, but it’s better than being in an accident,” said Downing.

“People say ‘oh you’re from Maine, you’re supposed to know how to drive in the snow,’ but it doesn’t matter who you are, driving on snowy roads is sketchy, even for Mainers,” said Bard.

Bard and Downing spent their time off in the same way that they believe most students did: relaxing and binge-watching some Netflix, while school work was put on the back burner.

“It was really nice to just have a couple days to chill,” said Downing.

Downing said that after stocking up on snack food at Hannaford before the storm, she knitted a winter hat, and had a Netflix marathon with her sister, knocking down several episodes of “Psychopath,” “Gossip Girl,” and “Parts Unknown.”

Bard, a resident in Gorham, spent one of her free days playing in the snow.

“I grabbed a sled and went out to the hill behind Robie Andrews,” said Bard. “There were people sledding, snowboarding and making snowmen.”

While it was evident throughout social media that most students enjoyed having three snow days, there were, however, some gripes expressed about the storm.

Downing proudly proclaimed that she didn’t fall down once last week, but she still cited under-plowed sidewalks as an annoying byproduct of the storm. A sidewalk in Gorham proved to be troublesome for Downing who said it was blocked off by a massive snowbank.

“I had to walk on the road for a bit and I kept hoping there would be no cars or buses coming down,” said Downing.

Frazier said that parking was more of an issue for him and his friends than anything else. According to Frazier, cars in the garage were locked within from 10 pm Monday, to 4 pm Wednesday when USM resumed classes.

“I don’t understand why the gates that let cars out one at a time could not have been functioning during the hours they normally do,” said Frazier. “I understand not allowing cars in, but not letting them out seems odd to me.”

However overall students applauded the efforts of USM public safety of keeping the snow clear in a timely manner.

“I think the clean up job was great,” said Frazier. “I couldn’t imagine it being any better considering the amount of snow we got.”

According to the Bangor Daily News, along with USM, over 300 other businesses and events were cancelled across the state because of last week’s weather conditions.

 

academic calendar

USM Popular Queries - Mon, 2015-02-02 09:01

storm

USM Popular Queries - Mon, 2015-02-02 09:01

UCU opens campus branch: students ready for convenient banking

USM Free Press News Feed - Thu, 2015-01-29 14:52

Last week, University Credit Union celebrated the grand opening of an on-campus branch in Gorham, giving residential students a quick and convenient banking location.

“We know that managing your finances can be confusing, so we want to be there for USM’s students, staff and faculty if they need any assistance at all,” said Amy Irish, UCU’s assistant vice president of member development.

The Brooks Student Center has housed an official UCU kiosk for years where members could deposit checks, manage their accounts and withdraw cash, but now a branch with regular business hours will provide students with more assistance if needed.
“Not only are we there to open new accounts, but anyone on campus can come to us to talk about loan applications, computer or car loans, budgeting assistance and loan payments, too,” said Irish.
The one-employee branch will be open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and by appointment during the week and the kiosk will be on and available whenever the student center is open.
Having a credit union on campus means that residential students will no longer have to trudge down to Casco Federal Credit Union on Main Street to access their account.
“Especially in the dead of winter, it can be a pain to leave campus,” said Irish.
“I’ve had late fees charged on my credit card just because I couldn’t bring myself to walk down to the credit union when it was below freezing out,” said junior marketing major Chris Egan.
While they haven’t been in to set-up an account yet, undeclared freshman Melissa Boone and Ashley Shaw said that they planned on looking into it.
“I’ve always been told that credit unions are better places to put your money,” said Shaw. “And since there’s one set-up practically on my way to lunch everyday, I’ll probably stop in.”
The new branch has a table of free UCU items to lure in passersby and Irish says she hopes that the branch will be able to serve more and more of the USM community as time goes on.
“We’ve always had students and staff tell us over the years that we should just open up on campus,” said Irish, noting that UCU has a branch open in Portland just a short walk from campus. “The opportunity presented itself late last year and we’ve been working on it ever since. We’re here to serve the community in any way that we can.”

UCU opens campus branch: students ready for convenient banking

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2015-01-27 19:14

Last week, University Credit Union celebrated the grand opening of an on-campus branch in Gorham, giving residential students a quick and convenient banking location.

“We know that managing your finances can be confusing, so we want to be there for USM’s students, staff and faculty if they need any assistance at all,” said Amy Irish, UCU’s assistant vice president of member development.

The Brooks Student Center has housed an official UCU kiosk for years where members could deposit checks, manage their accounts and withdraw cash, but now a branch with regular business hours will provide students with more assistance if needed.

“Not only are we there to open new accounts, but anyone on campus can come to us to talk about loan applications, computer or car loans, budgeting assistance and loan payments, too,” said Irish.

The one-employee branch will be open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and by appointment during the week and the kiosk will be on and available whenever the student center is open.

Having a credit union on campus means that residential students will no longer have to trudge down to Casco Federal Credit Union on Main Street to access their account.

“Especially in the dead of winter, it can be a pain to leave campus,” said Irish.

“I’ve had late fees charged on my credit card just because I couldn’t bring myself to walk down to the credit union when it was below freezing out,” said junior marketing major Chris Egan.

While they haven’t been in to set-up an account yet, undeclared freshman Melissa Boone and Ashley Shaw said that they planned on looking into it.

“I’ve always been told that credit unions are better places to put your money,” said Shaw. “And since there’s one set-up practically on my way to lunch everyday, I’ll probably stop in.”

The new branch has a table of free UCU items to lure in passersby and Irish says she hopes that the branch will be able to serve more and more of the USM community as time goes on.

“We’ve always had students and staff tell us over the years that we should just open up on campus,” said Irish, noting that UCU has a branch open in Portland just a short walk from campus. “The opportunity presented itself late last year and we’ve been working on it ever since. We’re here to serve the community in any way that we can.”

Number of adjunct professors on the rise at USM

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2015-01-27 19:14

By: Brian Gordon

The university has been firing tenured professors and replacing them with adjuncts or temporary workers as part of executing their vision of a “metropolitan university.” The administration has been carrying this out in the name of saving money.  The national average of adjuncts teaching is 50 percent  at 4-year public universities. USM uses more than 50 percent to teach their classes and is headed towards more as they let more full time professors go.

The adjuncts are paid per class, per semester. On average they are paid $3,215 per class, for a three credit course for a four month semester. Most adjuncts have to work second and third jobs to make ends meet. Still the adjuncts were adamant about their love of teaching and realized they wouldn’t become rich from it.

Michele Cheung has been teaching part time at USM for twenty years. She holds a master’s in Celtic languages and literatures and is also president of the Part Time Faculty Association union.

To make teaching adjunct work, she freelances, does marketing writing and has a share in a local cleaning company.

“It’s a stereotype that we’re not good enough to be full time faculty, this is a lurking attitude,” said Cheung “Most adjuncts don’t want to be full time; we want a life that’s a bit of this and a bit of that. However we do feel that we should be paid on par as full time.”

She used to teach four classes but now they’ve been done away with. This semester she’s only teaching one section of creative writing.

The administration has been pushing to get tenured professors teaching a full load of four classes, rather than two or three. But at the same time, the administration is cutting classes leaving the tenured professors fighting over classes with the adjuncts.

Cheung notes that adjuncts used to only teach introductory classes but now the tenured professors may need those courses to satisfy their own requirements set by the president and provost.

While some adjuncts are being brought in to replace full-time faculty who have been retrenched, in other departments they have been given fewer sections. This situation creates its own problems. As Cheung notes, adjuncts with the most seniority are the only ones left standing.

“The lesser temps can’t find work at USM. There’s no way for a person to make a living teaching one class; they’d have to pump gas or get government aid,” said Cheung.

Elizabeth Peavey was an USM adjunct teacher of public speaking for 20 years before her class was neutralized last fall.

“I knew I was going to dedicate an enormous amount of my week to this one class so then I had to find something to offset that,” said Peavey. “I did advertising work for years.”

“Anybody who goes into teaching, does it with their heart. It’s public service,” said Peavey. “You don’t aspire to teach for money or because it’s going to be easy.”

Andrew Barron just finished his master’s degree at USM in statistics. He is in his fourth semester as an adjunct teaching at USM. Barron would like to get hired on full time but knows that might not happen due to a campus-wide freeze of hiring tenured track professors. For now he’s content teaching adjunct as much as he can at USM and SMCC but realizes if he does want to get a full time job he might have to move out of state.

As for the pay, Barron isn’t complaining because he loves to teach but “you always pretty much have to do something else.” For Barron that something else was bartending and managing at local bar LFK.

“I can make more bartending two nights than a semester of teaching 12 credits.” said Barron. “It’s not the most efficient way to make money. So you have to like it.”

Susan Feiner professor of economics and women and gender studies thinks the use of adjuncts on campus is too prominent. She believes they are taking jobs that should go to tenured-track professors.

Feiner said there is a place for adjunct teachers on campus where they have a lot of experience in their field of expertise. For example, “A nurse, software designer, the judge in the law school,” said Feiner.

“I’m not saying they’re not good in the classrooms, but they are not teacher-scholars,” said Feiner, meaning they haven’t received their Ph.D and they don’t have a research background.

Do students notice a difference in the teaching quality between adjuncts and full time tenured track professors? “When I’m teaching, I’m teaching and my focus is on that. On the other hand I’m not teaching four courses so I can put more energy into the one or two I do,” said Cheung.

Crystal Lancaster, a Health Sciences major who notes she’s had nurses teaching her said, “I respect the adjuncts a lot more because they’re the ones that go out and do it, rather than someone that just blabs from a textbook.”

Some students have noticed a difference in teaching styles like Iris SanGiovanni, a political science sophomore. Her Spanish 201 class taught by an adjunct relied too heavily on English language Youtube videos, whereas a 202 Spanish class taught by a full time professor used more in class discussion taught in Spanish.

“I feel a little like Goldilocks because 201 was a little too relaxed and 202 was too strict. Perhaps if the adjunct professor had more time to commit to classroom preparation, they wouldn’t have needed to rely so heavily on videos,” said SanGiovanni.

Caleb Coleman, a senior economics major has had adjuncts with mixed success.

“Almost every full-time professor I’ve had has seemed more passionate about the content they are teaching.”

Coleman noted he had a great adjunct professor last year but he left for more money.

“It feels like adjuncts are usually there to just teach the class and would rather avoid spending too much extra time helping students, understandable, given their pay.”

Feiner believes relying too heavily on underpaid workers isn’t fair to the adjuncts or the students.

“This is the problem of administrators seeing everyone as assembly line workers. It’s a very diminished view of education,” said Feiner. “To make the part time worker the norm, rather than the exception is very very detrimental to the academic enterprise.”

“As conditions for full time faculty grow worse and more like the conditions for adjuncts faculty, theres going to be more and more alliances and coalition building and backing each other up. I’m all for that,” said Cheung. “It’s just another way the university is not investing in the school by not investing in teachers.”

Students still prefer the classic classroom experience

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2015-01-27 19:11

In the fall, the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences issued a survey to ask students in the department which kind of learning they prefer. A resonating 92 percent answered that they prefer in person instruction, with two percent preferring online, and five percent preferring the blended classroom concept.

Leonard Shedletsky, professor of communication, has focused his teaching efforts online but does enjoy both.

“While the two contexts differ in many ways, there are ways in which they share significant features,” said Shedletsky. “What I have in mind is the potential more and more to meet live or synchronously online, to discuss, hear one another’s voice, see one another, share documents, view texts and videos together and to feel the immediacy of one another.”

Shedletsky noted the results of the survey, but advised that they be considered very carefully.

“These data should not be taken too literally without deeper examination,” Shedletsky said. “I believe that when people imagine the comparison there is a tendency to imagine scenarios that are not realistic. There is a tendency to romanticize the classroom, a world of give and take, authentic talk, engaged debate. Little of that is actually true, however.”

Matthew Killmeier, chair of the department of communication and media studies, explained that the survey was taken in class, which may cause some bias. He also recognized that when the department offers online classes, they fill up quickly.

“The bias is this survey is one we did in class,” said Killmeier. “When we offer an online section of something it usually fills up right away. There is demand. There is a considerable number of students that do do exclusively online.”

Killmeier went onto explain that one of his students, a blueberry farmer in Washington County, completed his communication degree completely online.

“It’s got potential if you do it right, recognizing that online is not for everybody, and I think a lot of students would attest to that,” said Killmeier. “It demands a lot more of the student. They have to be very self-disciplined because it is asynchronous.”

Ashley Belanger, sophomore biology major, believes there are pros and cons to online learning.

“[Online classes are] easier in some aspects because it’s more time friendly and convenient but also harder because it is not the first class you think of and it can be harder to focus,” Belanger said.

Belanger doesn’t believe that students should be able to complete a degree solely online, because that may deprive students of the hands-on aspect that some require to thrive. However, she does think offering online classes to those who may need it is a good route to go.

“I believe that it would be a good idea [to offer more classes online] since a great portion of our students work while going to school or have a family to take care of,” said Belanger. “It would fit better in almost everybody’s schedule.”

Lexi Huot, an undeclared freshman, is currently enrolled in her first online class at USM, but explained that she already knows that she prefers a face-to-face educational environment.

“With my class right now it’s very confusing to know what is due and how the professor wants it done,” said Huot. “Whereas, in a classroom environment they explained how the assignment should be done.”

She added that online classes are helping her manage her time better, since they are more independent.

Huot recognized that online classes are not how everyone learns.

“Many students, like myself, prefer to see the material done in front of us,” said Huot. “I also feel it is easier to engage in a class discussion when you have everyone else in front of you instead of going back to check your computer to see what your other classmates opinion is on the topic.”

Regardless of the preference, all agreed that online learning has potential, but is certainly not something that should be required, as students all have different needs.

“A quality academic experience, whether online or face-to-face is the goal we need to seek,” said Shedletsky. “It can be done if we set our minds to it.”

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