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Locker Project establishes pantries in local high schools

USM Free Press News Feed - Mon, 2016-05-02 18:57

By Angelina Smith, Contributor

In Maine, 1 out of 4 children are food-insecure, and in Portland and other locations in the state,it is often 3 out of 4 children.

Maine has the highest rate of child hunger in New England and the need for nutritious food for these hungry children is critical.

The Locker Project is a non-profit organization that creates and supports food pantries in schools, and helps meet the needs of children suffering from food insecurity in Maine.

The Locker Project began in 2011 when Katie Wallace, a volunteer and parent of a student at the East End Community School in Portland, noticed that some kids had to sit out during snack time and went hungry.

Wallace began to bring in snacks for these kids, and soon began a small food pantry with the help of the school nurse and a grant from the Good Shepherd Food Bank, so children could bring home food with them.

From there, the pantry expanded to other schools like Deering High School and Presumpscot Elementary School, and with collaboration with the Good Shepherd Food Bank, continues to provide food for students to eat as snacks at school or to take home with them.

In the future, the Locker Project plans to establish more food pantries in schools across the state of Maine in order to reach as many children as possible.

In coordination with the Locker Project, USM students in Professor Sharon Timberlake’s Honors course, A Cultural and Historical Perspective on Poverty, recently stuffed thirty bags with food for children to bring home with them from school to help them get through their vacation week, a time during which students who would normally be provided meals and snacks at school often go hungry.

The bags were enthusiastically filled with macaroni and cheese, soups, granola bars, breakfast cereal, and other foods, and carried to an awaiting van to be delivered to the school.

“I am thrilled that the students in HON 103 had an opportunity to provide emergency vacation food supplies to food insecure school children in Portland,” said Professor Timberlake.

While the class is interested in working for long term change, students recognize the importance of healthy food and good nutrition in the academic performance and overall health of young people.

USM students interested in getting involved with the Locker Project can help in all kinds of ways, such as organizing a food drive, starting an online donation drive, or assisting with tasks liking loading vans or delivering food.

Some foods that are particularly good for children to be able to bring home with them from school pantries are boxes of macaroni and cheese, pasta, pasta sauce, cans of soup, peanut butter, granola bars, cereal, tuna fish, rice, instant meals, beans, and canned fruit and vegetables.

You can even start your own food pantry, in your hometown or wherever you recognize a school in need of one, with the help of the Locker Project.

For more information about this, and the Locker Project in general, you can contact the Locker Project by calling 899-9540, emailing them at info@mainelockerproject.org, or finding them on Facebook through their website at mainelockerproject.org.

 

Networkmaine Maintenance - Portland and Gorham campuses May 04, 2016

Outages - Mon, 2016-05-02 13:27
Where: Portland and Gorham campuses
When: May 04, 2016 5 AM
Expected Duration: 2hrs
Scope: Buildings listed

Summary:
We will be performing network maintenance that will impact voice services for no more than 15 minutes to the following buildings:

Portland
Glickman Library
Wishcamper

Gorham
Upper-Class Hall

Data services will not be impacted. Please plan accordingly.

Networkmaine Contact Info:
NOC 561-3587

Local/Campus Contact Info during this window of work:
NONE / Unknown at this time

Networkmaine Maintenance - USM Portland Datacenter May 04, 2016

Outages - Mon, 2016-05-02 09:14
Where: USM Portland Datacenter
When: May 04, 2016 5 AM
Expected Duration: 2hrs
Scope: Internet Connectivity - Various Schools

Summary:
We will be migrating connections to different equipment. Most sites should NOT realize a loss of connectivity as their Orono paths will remain active.

The following sites will be affected by this maintenance:

Andover ES
Forest dale
Hebron Academy
Hebron Station ES
St Dominic HS
All Saints
Wood stock ES
Andover
Auburn
Zadoc
Norway Mem Lib
Hamlin Mem Lib
Paris
Waterville
West Paris
Walker Mem Lib
Oxford County Coop Ext
Brewer
EMMC Health Science
Alternative Ed Pr Bangor
Oxford Norway [...]

graduation tickets

USM Popular Queries - Sun, 2016-05-01 09:01

commencement tickets

USM Popular Queries - Sun, 2016-05-01 09:01

summer session

USM Popular Queries - Sat, 2016-04-30 10:01

residential life

USM Popular Queries - Sat, 2016-04-30 10:01

orientation

USM Popular Queries - Fri, 2016-04-29 15:01

Re: Networkmaine Maintenance - USM *** EMERGENCY MAINTENANCE *** Apr 29, 2016

Outages - Fri, 2016-04-29 06:03
All APs came back up after the update. USM-Muskie was also affected.

On Thu, Apr 28, 2016 at 4:09 PM, wrote:

> Where: USM *** EMERGENCY MAINTENANCE ***
> When: Apr 29, 2016 5:00AM
> Expected Duration: 1/2hr
> Scope: USM Gorham ResHall, Luther Bonney, Glickman, some coop exts and
> centers
>
> Summary:
> Wireless controller software will be upgraded to fix a Cisco bug
> which caused a crash on 4-28.
>
> Details:
>
>
> Networkmaine Contact Info during the window for this work:
> jasonm@maine.edu
> NOC 561-3587
>
> Local/Campus Contact Info [...]

Networkmaine Maintenance - USM *** EMERGENCY MAINTENANCE *** Apr 29, 2016

Outages - Thu, 2016-04-28 16:09
Where: USM *** EMERGENCY MAINTENANCE ***
When: Apr 29, 2016 5:00AM
Expected Duration: 1/2hr
Scope: USM Gorham ResHall, Luther Bonney, Glickman, some coop exts and centers

Summary:
Wireless controller software will be upgraded to fix a Cisco bug which caused a crash on 4-28.

Networkmaine Contact Info:
NOC 561-3587

Local/Campus Contact Info during this window of work:
NONE / Unknown at this time

engineering

USM Popular Queries - Thu, 2016-04-28 10:01

bus schedule

USM Popular Queries - Wed, 2016-04-27 10:01

Re: Networkmaine Maintenance - Orono Apr 27, 2016

Outages - Wed, 2016-04-27 06:53
This maintenance has been completed.

On Monday, April 25, 2016, Lucas Wood wrote:

> Where: Orono
> When: Apr 27, 2016 5a
> Expected Duration: 2hrs
> Scope: Oxford Sites
>
> Summary:
> We will be migrating our Oxford Networks hand-off. Sites should
> NOT realize a loss of connectivity as their Portland paths will remain
> active.
>
> The following sites will be affected by this maintenance:
>
> Andover ES
> Forest dale
> Hebron Academy
> Hebron Station ES
> St Dominic HS
> All Saints
> Wood stock ES
> Andover
> Auburn
[...]

Small businesses look for skilled lawyers

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2016-04-26 18:28

By Candice Isaac, Free Press Staff

The student organization Maine Law’s Business Law Association held its final panel of the academic year last week, titled “What Do Small Businesses Expect from Their Attorneys?” The panelists helped to reinforce the need for the entrepreneur and legal professional relationship, while law student attendees learned about yet another avenue in which to use their legal degrees.

John Kaminski, an attorney at Drummond Woodsum, whose practice focuses on transactional business and tax law, moderated the presentation. Panelists included both attorneys and small business owners, as well as those who are a combination of the two. Panelists engaged attendees by discussing the needs of the entrepreneur and the point at which legal counsel is often sought.

Sage Friedman, co-founder of Theobroma LLC and a second-year law student at the University of Maine School of Law, suggested that some new entrepreneurs may not always know what small business owners look for in a lawyer.

“Entrepreneurs should think about their business interests and their personal interests,” he explained. As a business consultant, Friedman often counsels small business owners to ensure that “everyone in the deal has their own lawyer.”

Owen McCarthy, president of MedRhythms, added that it was important for new small business owners to reach out to other business founders for attorney recommendations. McCarthy also advised that when interviewing potential attorneys, small business owners should look for client-focused attorneys.

According to McCarthy, client-focused attorneys are sincerely interested in growing with one’s business and are attentive of where a business is headed. Kaminski also remarked that “competence, chemistry, and fit” are important in selecting an attorney.

The role of the attorney is often not one that operates in isolation, so small business owners should also look for attorneys who are well-rounded and who can see the gaps in the business’ overall plans.

Tamlyn M. Frederick, a partner at Frederick, Quinlan & Tupper LLC, said that she often takes on the role of educator when new entrepreneurs first come to her. Frederick said her role as an educator in assessing risks for new clients is integral in helping them make the right decisions for their businesses. Additionally, knowing how to adapt  to different situations, and prior work experience, can go a long way with clients.

Helen Sterling Coburn, a transactional associate at Bernstein Shur, concurred with Frederick’s remarks, adding that in the legal field customer service is highly important. Sterling Coburn added that addressing client concerns upfront and providing clients with information on free community resources like SCORE can help to build and gain client trust. SCORE is a nonprofit association dedicated to helping small businesses get off the ground, grow and achieve their goals through education and mentorship.

Jess Knox, president of Olympico Strategies, concluded by saying that attorneys should think beyond themselves and look for opportunities to help the larger business community by offering free advice via blogs. For Knox, regulatory support is another hurdle that many small businesses need to overcome.

She also suggests that attorneys “look for things that are key barriers for growth” and step up to assist their clients. He further advised that attorneys not wait for the perfect question from clients, and if they see a red flag, they should raise the question themselves.

Overall, small business owners need a good relationship with an attorney that can advocate for their businesses. Knox concluded his statements by saying that companies should engage lawyers around the contract phase, which ensures they have a successful start.

 

Angus King joins climate change panel

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2016-04-26 18:27

By Bryer Sousa, Free Press Staff

The Muskie School of Public Service of the University of Southern Maine initiated its 2016-2017 Public Service Speakers Series by way of hosting a panel on April 22, 2016, designated as Earth Day, that was concerned with the Paris Agreement on climate that was signed by 175 nations on the same day. The Paris Agreement on Climate Change was supported by the 196 Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention of the Climate Change during COP21 that was held on December 12, 2015.

The Paris accord on climate change, that has been ratified by the 175 nations who signed it at the United Nations headquarters in New York, aims to prevent a global temperature increase of 1.5 degrees Celsius, even though the countries pledged their efforts at halting the rise of global temperature to two degrees Celsius. However, critics such as Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, environmental activist, and author of Eaarth, who spoke to USM community members earlier this semester, have claimed that the COP21 agreement will not enable the international community to achieve the goals discussed in the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

The panel took place in Hannaford Hall on the University of Maine campus at 3:30 P.M. Free and open to the public, this panel discussion was hosted by Maine Public Broadcasting Network’s Susan Sharon. The members of the panel included U.S. Senator Angus King, Dr. Andrew Deutz, Director of International Government Relations for the Nature Conservancy, and Executive Director of Efficiency Maine, Michael Stoddard.

Introducing the panel, Director of the Muskie School of Public Service and Professor of Geography, Dr. Firooza Pavri stated that “it is my privilege to welcome all of you to the Muskie School of Public Service Speaker series for 2016-2017… the theme of our speaker series for the coming year is climate, society, and Maine’s future… from public health… to the development of sustainable urban design. Senator Edmond Muskie’s indelible environmental law legacy is, quite simply put, stunning. Both in terms of its scoop and its positive impact over the past four plus decades, on the importance we play on our nations and our worlds resources.” MPBN’s Susan Sharon introduced the members of the panel to those in attendance.

“The Paris Agreement has been called a lot of things, including, historic, durable, and ambitious… like anything else this agreement has some flaws, so let’s break down the good and the bad and the potential trouble spots.

First of all, let me ask you what do you think were the most significant achievements, Dr. Deutz?” Sharon stated.

In response, Dr. Deutz said “there were 187 countries plus the European Union in Paris, each of whom put on the table their own national commitments to reduce climate change. So we are now in a world where pretty much every country in the world are committed to solving this problem… everyone has agreed that they will come back every five years, review the science, review the actions that countries are taking and agree to comeback with new and more ambitious commitments every five years.”

Thereafter, U.S. Senator Angus King also shared his thoughts on the COP21 climate agreement, expressing that “the agreement isn’t perfect, it probably doesn’t go far enough in terms of what we have to do… to have an international agreement of this scope is really pretty amazing.”

Further into the dialogue that transpired, Meaghan LaSala, who travelled to Paris to attend the climate talks with a delegation called It Takes Roots to Weather the Storm, of Divest UMaine and the Southern Maine Workers Center, raised the following question to Senator King:

“Just this week you cosponsored a bill on biomass. Maine’s biomass, in addition to burning wood, also burn construction and demolition debris from surrounding states, most of which ban the burning and dumping of this debris, so do you support the burning of out of state waste as a renewable energy?” King answered by saying that “Susan Collins and I sponsored an amendment of the energy bill to make sure that the federal government defines biomass in a consistent way across all the agencies… I think that biomass is carbon neutral.”

After the panel finished its conversation, LaSala shared her thoughts and reflections upon the talk, pointing out that “I find it extremely disturbing that Angus King sponsored a bill, just this week, about biomass and that he doesn’t know that biomass incineration includes the incineration of waste… it is a real problem that companies could be getting renewable energy credit by burning waste and debris. There was also a bailout of these biomass companies, by the taxpayers, that happened recently… without any stipulation that would ensure that those companies could not take the money and leave Maine tomorrow.”

For the entire panel conversation, one may follow up with MPBN’s programming to listen to the recorded audio or video of the event.

 

USM chemistry lab to open next semester

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2016-04-26 18:26

Next year, incoming freshman majoring in any science degree can expect to have a new, updated lab, located in the Science Building. This room will serve 100 level chemistry courses, with an estimated 500 students per year, and will take place in a room that’s no longer filled with outdated equipment.

According to Caryn Prudenté, professor and chair of the chemistry department, explained that the current chemistry lab, which resides in Payson Smith, was built sometime in the 1950’s – Charcoal square tables sit cluttered in the small room, old equipment scattered and out-of-date. Prudenté made it clear that the current lab in Payson Smith is not appropriate and applicable to real-world research.

“This lab was built on the idea of providing more space for modern, sophisticated equipment. The lab in Payson Smith looks nothing like a modern chemistry labs should,” she said. “Students look at this and it doesn’t bare any resemblance with what they might see in the workforce or in graduate school. It will be much more modern and a more enhanced experience.”

She further explained that the lab was constructed with the idea to collaborate work amongst students in mind. Most work in entry level chemistry, she states, is project based. This will allow local high school students to also take advantage of the new labs, which are set to be used for classes taking place this summer.

“It’s nice to have this new lab in the Science Building, instead of across campus. I have sophomores and Juniors who have never been to the science building!” she exclaimed. “Getting them in here, interacting with upper level students and seeing this building helps develop a sense of community. It gives students a sense of where they belong.”

In the chemistry department, there are three teaching labs: The organic lab, biochemistry lab and an analytical chemistry lab. According to Prudenté, each lab has a specific function that needs its own dedicated space, which explains why a new chemistry 101 lab, located in the same building as the other classes, was a decision that made sense in order to accommodate the rising interest in chemistry studies.

 

Fourth annual day of electronic recycling

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2016-04-26 18:26

By Colin Cundy, Free Press Staff

Springtime in Maine means many things: warmer weather, summer clothing, coats left on hangers and mud season are but the first to come to mind. Spring is also a time of year for new beginnings, and a time to clean out the past year’s clutter. Recently, some people were able to add recycling stock-piled electronic waste to that list.

Last Saturday was the 4th Annual Community Electronic Waste Recycling Day at USM. The event was held at the Woodbury Campus Center parking lot from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Since its inception in 2012, the event has become more prominent over the past four years, in large part because it has spread beyond the student body.

“Over 500 cars came last year,” said Emily Eschner, Asset and Surplus Coordinator for USM. While working with facilities on sustainability issues, she also runs USM’s surplus store. People who know about this recycling event sometimes save up their e-waste all year so that they have something to contribute.

Eschner continued: “I think recycling makes a ton of sense, both environmentally and economically. She then went on to point out that the Planet only has a finite amount of resources. Recycling will make that waste useful again, keep it out of a landfill, and probably be cheaper than extracting new raw materials.”

Eschner added that at this point, community members who drop off their electronics have come to outnumber students. Each year, hundreds of cars drop off thousands of pounds of electronic waste. Last year, the event received over 54,000 pounds of recycled materials, with 3,500 of those pounds in appliances alone.

The 2014 event saw an even larger turnout and numbers, however, as over 700 cars arrived for the E-waste recycling day. During that year’s event, over 60,000 pounds of waste was recycled, which included more than 6,000 pounds in appliances.

Among the items accepted during this event are televisions, computers and laptops, hard drives, monitors, keyboards, mice, speakers and other peripherals, printers, copiers, scanners, fax machines, stereo equipment, cords, chargers, wires, cell phones telephones, cameras, refrigerators, air conditioners, microwaves and a variety of other household electronic waste.

There are some items that cannot be collected, though, because often times USM recycles those items year-round. Batteries, light bulbs and smoke detectors are not accepted. Batteries for example can be recycled at each of the university’s three libraries. There are wooden kiosks where they can be deposited year round.

Volunteers were on hand in the parking lot, aiding in the unloading of electronic waste from what will most likely be hundreds of cars. The event will also served as a fundraiser for Preble Street Resource Center, for which these events have raised considerable funds in past years.

USM is also undertaking measures to reduce its carbon footprint, increase recycling and increasing awareness of how to be more sustainable in everyday life. Sustainability at USM’s is behind most environmental program and initiative at the University. Their website details the extent to which USM goes in being more sustainable. It also has detailed information on how to recycle just about everything.

 

The minds of USM showcase work at Thinking Matters

USM Free Press News Feed - Tue, 2016-04-26 18:26

For college students, there is a lot of work that goes on inside the classroom. Regardless of their workloads, some students still choose to do research outside of the classroom, with the hopes of educating others on topics that mean a lot to them. Last week, that work was put on display during the annual event Thinking Matters.

The event started with breakfast as posters were starting to be put up, followed by some opening statements. The first comment was from the director of research, Kris Sahonchik who stated that Thinking Matters is one of the most important days of the calendar year.

“I hope that other people too are going to see these [student presentations], along with all the other work that’s here, and learn as much as they can possibly learn,” Sahonchik said.

Ethan Strimling, the mayor of Portland, was also in attendance last Friday, saying a few words before the presentations began. He joked that through his experience of participating in politics, sometimes thinking doesn’t matter enough.

“The only word I would add to your title is critical thinking matters and questioning thinking matters. I hope that as you do this work, you’re continually trying to question what it is that you already see and try to confirm whether that may be true,” Mayor Strimling said.

This year, there were over 100 poster displays and student presentations, all of which showcased many different kinds of work students – whether it’s graduate studies work, or just a presentation on just something that is of high interest to them.

One student presentation titled, “Characterization of a Magnetic Tension Pendulum,” was given by Alexander Knight, who started the design process six years ago. The presentation focused on work that was trying to, “measure the strength, direction, and variations of the earth’s magnetic field in Portland, ME.”

Professor of environmental science Joe Staples regarded the research done by Knight as, “some really extraordinary work.” Most of the work is grounded in physics and high level mathematics, so Staples made it clear that he understood most of it, but not all of it.

Knight references some troubles that he ran into while conducting his research. He stated that the apparatus he was working with was highly sensitive and would track the greatest change in magnetic fields, which wasn’t always helpful.

“So when this thing is at a very high grade of sensitivity, we have a six-foot tall car detector,” Knight said. “ Any cars that drive by, it would stop what it’s doing and track [the cars] as long as it was in its field of view and then go back to what it was doing.”

Knight also explained that it is very difficult to track magnetic field data in a big city like Portland because there is just too much noise – such as noise from a car or a plane overhead – that messes with the data, which explains why a majority of magnetic field tests take place in the part of the country where there will be very little interference.

Timothy Sprague, a communications major, gave a presentation titled, “The Deep Structure of Bullsh*t,” which was based on research done by Harry Frankfurt, who stated that the essence of bullsh*t isn’t that it is fake, but rather that it is a phony concept. This project was a collaboration between Sprague and Lenny Shedletsky, a professor of communications at USM.

According to the abstract submitted, the research explores people’s perceptions of the nature of bullsh*t, their perceptions of its frequency in their lives and their perceived responses to bullsh*t. Sprague discussed a pilot study that was done where 83 percent of respondents said that at least 30 percent of their interactions on a day-to-day basis were BS.

“Bullsh*t is kind of a rhetorical device. You are trying to persuade somebody, but by using this BS,” Sprague said. “In Greek rhetoric, there’s three layers: Logos, pathos and ethos… So I’m thinking that there should be a fourth layer and that’s bullsh*t.”

After the preliminary study, there was another survey that went around, that gathered responses from mostly college aged kids, that showed that most people agreed that the most BS is encountered in the mass media. Surveyees were also asked what BS means to them and a lot of responses featured the words “misleading” or “embellishing,” according to Sprague.

Along with the three oral sessions, there were also three sessions devoted to poster presentations, with more than 100 students displaying posters of the research that have been conducting over the past semester and for some even longer than that.

Poster topics included: Fighting the Ebola virus, journalism ethics in a digital age, the impact of incarceration on relationships, Malaga Island geochemistry and even a poster that detailed why red hair comes in so many shades.

Before the Thinking Matters event took place, Rebecca Nisetich, director of the honors program and chair of Thinking Matters, wrote an oped piece for the Portland Press Herald where she states why an event like this matters.

“Research shows that to foster long-term student success, we need to give students opportunities to use their learning in real-world contexts,” Nisetich stated in her Press Herald piece. “At USM, our students learn with their communities in ways that shape their careers and broaden their horizons.”

senior week

USM Popular Queries - Tue, 2016-04-26 10:01

Networkmaine Maintenance - Orono Apr 27, 2016

Outages - Mon, 2016-04-25 11:27
Where: Orono
When: Apr 27, 2016 5a
Expected Duration: 2hrs
Scope: Oxford Sites

Summary:
We will be migrating our Oxford Networks hand-off. Sites should NOT realize a loss of connectivity as their Portland paths will remain active.

The following sites will be affected by this maintenance:

Andover ES
Forest dale
Hebron Academy
Hebron Station ES
St Dominic HS
All Saints
Wood stock ES
Andover
Auburn
Zadoc
Norway Mem Lib
Hamlin Mem Lib
Paris
Waterville
West Paris
Walker Mem Lib
Oxford County Coop Ext
Brewer
EMMC Health Science
Alternative Ed Pr Bangor
Oxford Norway South Paris Ctr
Central Maine Christian Acad
[...]

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