Department of Biological Sciences

Douglas Currie Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology and Graduate Coordinator
Douglas  Currie Ph.D.

Office

178 Science

Contact Information

Phone: 207.228.8192

University of St. Andrews, B.Sc., 1985
University of Cambridge, Ph.D., 1992

Research Interests

Brain development is a fascinating and incredibly complex process. Billions of neurons are generated and then must differentiate, sending out axons and dendrites, and make connections with target neurons throughout the brain. As a developmental neurobiologist I am broadly interested in these events.

Work in my lab focuses on trying to understand specific aspects of brain development. In particular, we are interested in understanding how electrical activity, at very early stages of development, shapes and regulates the development of neurons in the brain. We are currently investigating one of the major molecular pathways by which this activity regulates neuron development, the nitric oxide (NO)/ cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway.

We also developed a new line of research in collaboration with other members of the Center for Integrated and Applied Environmental Toxicology here at USM. The emphasis of this program is to investigate the effects of exposure to arsenic in utero on neuronal development in the brain. Arsenic contamination of ground water is a significant issue in a number of New England states.

Our research approach employs multiple techniques including immunohistochemistry, pharmacological manipulations, culturing of brain slices and neurons, dye labeling and confocal microscopy.

Recent Publications

Markowski, V.P., Currie, D., Reeve, E.A., Thompson, D., and Wise, Sr., J.P. (2011) Tissue-specific and dose-related accumulation of arsenic in mouse offspring following maternal consumption of arsenic-contaminated water. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology. 108(5):326-332.

Frankel, S.E., Riley, F.E., Ramsdell, D., Currie, D., Ng, A.-K., and Duboise, S.M. (2010) Presenting molecular biology in an ecological context: the Maine ScienceCorps Partnership in rural high school science education. Science Education and Civic Engagement. 2(2): 24-28.

Frankel, S., Concannon, J. Brusky, K., Pietrowicz, E., Giorgianni, S., Thompson, W.D. and Currie, D.A. (2009)  Arsenic exposure disrupts neurite growth and complexity in vitro.  Neurotoxicology.  30(4):529-37.

Currie, D. A., Corlew, R. DeVente J. and Moody, W. J. (2009). Elevated glutamate and NMDA disrupt production of the second messenger cyclic GMP in the early postnatal mouse cortex. Developmental Neurobiology  69(4):255-66.