2013-14 Catalogs

Course Descriptions

Undergraduate

BIO 101 Biological Foundations
An introduction to the areas of current biological interest: molecular and cellular biology, genetics and development, and evolution and population biology. Intended primarily for students selecting a laboratory science to satisfy the Core curriculum or for those students not intending to take other courses in the biological sciences. This course cannot be used as a prerequisite for other biology courses. Cr 3.

BIO 102 Biological Experiences
Laboratory studies to complement and illustrate the concepts presented in BIO 101. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent registration in BIO 101. Cr 1.

BIO 103 Introduction to Marine Biology
Selected groups of marine plants and animals are used to develop an understanding of biological processes and principles that are basic to all forms of life in the sea. Integrated in the course are aspects of taxonomy, evolution, ecology, behavior, and physiology. Intended primarily for students selecting a laboratory science to satisfy the Core curriculum or for those students not intending to take other courses in the biological sciences. Cr 3.

BIO 104 Marine Biology Laboratory
An examination of prototype organisms will be used to illustrate their varied roles in the ocean. Prior or concurrent registration in BIO 103. Cr 1.

BIO 105 Biological Principles I: Cellular Biology
This is an introduction to the scientific principles of molecular biology, cell biology, and genetics. Prerequisite: students must have fulfilled the University minimum proficiency requirements in writing and mathematics. Cr 3.

BIO 106 Laboratory Biology
Laboratory experiences illustrating concepts and principles introduced in BIO 105. Concurrent enrollment in BIO 105 is highly recommended. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher or concurrent enrollment in BIO 105. Students must have fulfilled the University minimum proficiency requirements in writing and mathematics. Cr 1.5.

BIO 107 Biological Principles II: Evolution, Biodiversity, and Ecology
This is an integrated lecture-laboratory course introducing students to the scientific principles of evolution, biodiversity, and ecology. The lecture and laboratory each meet three hours weekly. Prerequisites: grades of C- or higher in BIO 105 and BIO 106. Cr 4.5.

BIO 109 Biological Principles III: Functional Biology
This is an introduction to the scientific principles of structure and function in plants and animals. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 3.

BIO 111 Human Anatomy and Physiology I
The course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence concerning the structure and function of the human body. The course focuses on the study of cell chemistry, cell physiology, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscle system, and nervous system. Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of minimum proficiency requirements. Cr 3.

BIO 112 Practical Human Anatomy and Physiology I
Laboratory experiences illustrating concepts and principles introduced in BIO 111. The course will cover the following topics: metrics, language of anatomy, cell physiology, tissues, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system. Prerequisite: BIO 111 or concurrent. Cr 1.5.

BIO 201 Genetics
A study of the organization, transmission and expression of genes and genomes. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 105 or BIO 111, or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 205 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
The comparative study of vertebrate organ systems from an adaptational and evolutionary point of view. Lecture three hours/week; one four-hour laboratory/week. Prerequisites: grade of C- or higher in BIO 109 or BIO 211. Cr 5.

BIO 211 Human Anatomy and Physiology II
This course is a continuation of BIO 111. The structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems will be discussed. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 111. Cr 3.

BIO 212 Practical Human Anatomy and Physiology II
Laboratory studies of the structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, reproductive, digestive, and urinary systems. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 112; BIO 211 or concurrently. Cr 1.5.

BIO 217 Evolution
A study of the fossil record, adaptive changes in genes and traits by natural selection, and the evolution of diversity and complexity. Prerequisites: grades of C- or higher in BIO 107 and BIO 201, or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 231 Botany
A study of structure, function, development, reproduction, and environmental adaptations of representative non-vascular and vascular plants. Lecture three hours/week; one three-hour laboratory/week. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 107 or permission of instructor. Cr 4.5.

BIO 251 History of Biology
A chronological survey of developments in biological investigations from earliest records to the present day. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 105 or 111, or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 281 Microbiology and Human Disease
Fundamentals of microbiology with emphasis on infectious diseases of people, including bacteria, rickettsia, fungi, viruses, protozoa and helminths. Prerequisites: grade of C- or higher in BIO 105 or BIO 111, and CHY 107 or CHY 113. This course does not fulfill the Area 3 requirement. Cr 3.

BIO 282 Microbiology and Human Disease Laboratory
Laboratory techniques in the cultivation, identification, and control of microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIO 281 or concurrently. This course does not fulfill the Area 3 requirement. Cr 2.

BIO 291 Ornithology
This course studies the basic biology of birds: their life histories, migration, ecology, and economic importance, with emphasis on species found in Eastern North America. Numerous field trips to a variety of habitats will be taken for purposes of field identification. Students are responsible for their own appropriate outdoor clothing and footwear and for binoculars. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or higher in BIO 107, or permission of instructor. Cr 4.5.

BIO 305 Developmental Biology
An analysis of the cellular and molecular interactions leading to normal development. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 3.

BIO 306 Developmental Biology Laboratory
This laboratory course is designed to illustrate principles of animal development introduced in BIO 305 using genetic, histochemical, and molecular analyses. Prerequisite: prior or concurrent registration in BIO 305. Cr 2.

BIO 311 Microbiology
This course is a comprehensive introduction to cellular, biochemical, and genetic aspects of prokaryotes. Viruses and some eukaryotic micro-organisms are also considered. Prerequisites: grade of C- or higher in CHY 115 and BIO 107; or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 312 Microbiological Laboratory
The laboratory explores basic techniques of isolation and cultivation of microorganisms, primarily bacteria and fungi. In addition, biochemical, molecular, and genetic analyses of microorganisms are introduced. Prerequisite: prior or concurrent registration in BIO 311. Cr 2.

BIO 321 Neurobiology
This course presents an overview of nervous system function, structure, and development. Content focuses on the cellular and molecular properties that underlie normal function. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 109 or BIO 111, or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 322 Neurobiology Laboratory
This laboratory course is designed to enable students to gain experience with a range of experimental techniques used in neurobiology research. These include cell culture, electrophysiology, histochemistry, microscopy, and behavioral analyses. Prerequisite: prior or concurrent registration in BIO 321. Cr 2.

BIO 331 Ecological Principles
A scientific study of interactions determining the distribution and abundance of organisms. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 3.

BIO 332 Field Ecology
Field studies demonstrating basic concepts of ecology. Prerequisite: BIO 331 or concurrently. Cr 2.

BIO 335 Entomology
Integrated lecture-laboratory course on the biology of insects and their impact on humanity. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 3.

BIO 337 Marine Ecology
A comparative ecological study of coastal and oceanic environments. Lecture, three hours/week; weekly four-hour field trip. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 5.

BIO 345 Pathophysiology
A study of the physiological, genetic, biochemical and environmental basis of noninfectious diseases. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 109 or BIO 211, or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 351 Invertebrate Zoology
The morphology, physiology and evolution of invertebrate animals. Three hours of lecture and two, two-hour laboratories per week. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 5.

BIO 353 Vertebrate Zoology
This course is a survey of the vertebrate animals, focusing on classification, morphology, physiology, ecology, behavior, and evolutionary history of each group. Lecture three hours a week; one four-hour laboratory a week. Prerequisites: grade of C- or higher in BIO 109. Cr 5.

BIO 361 Parasitology
The life histories and host-parasite relationships of animal parasites, with emphasis on those of humans. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 2.

BIO 362 Parasitological Laboratory
The morphology and life cycles of parasitic protozoa, helminths, and arthropods. Prerequisite: BIO 361 or concurrently.
Cr 2.

BIO 381 Plant Physiology
This course is a study of the physiological activities of plants, and their growth and development as influenced by internal and external factors. Lecture three hours/week; one three-hour laboratory/week. Prerequisites: CHY 115 and grade of C- or higher in either BIO 109 or BIO 231; or permission of instructor. Cr 4.5.

BIO 383 Plant Ecology
This course examines plant ecology at the population, community, and ecosystem levels. Plant adaptations to the environment are also discussed, with emphasis on how these traits influence community and ecosystem processes. Weekly field trips are required. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 5.

BIO 401 Animal Physiology
A study of physiological processes and their regulation in animals. Prerequisites: CHY 115, either PHY 111 or PHY 121, and grade of C- or higher in either BIO 107 or BIO 211; or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 402 Animal Physiology Laboratory
Laboratory examination of physiological mechanisms in animals. Prerequisite: BIO 401 or concurrently; MAT 220. Cr 2.

BIO 403 Comparative Animal Physiology
Physiological and biochemical basis of environmental adaptation in animals. Prerequisites: CHY 115, junior standing, and grade of C- or higher in BIO 107. Cr 3.

BIO 404 Comparative Animal Physiology Laboratory
Laboratory experiments on the physiological basis of environmental adaptation. Emphasis is on marine animals. Prerequisite: BIO 403 or concurrently; MAT 220. Cr 2.

BIO 405 Animal Behavior
This course is a study of the principles of behavioral organization in vertebrate and invertebrate animals, with emphasis on behavior under natural conditions. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 107 or BIO 211, or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 406 Animal Behavior Laboratory
This course is a laboratory and field examination of behavioral principles in animals. Prerequisite: BIO 405 or concurrently. Cr 2.

BIO 407 Environmental Modulation of Developmental Mechanisms
This is a molecular genetic analysis of development focusing on an integrative approach toward understanding the evolution of developmental mechanisms. Prerequisite: grades of C- or higher in BIO 201 and BIO 305, or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 408 Experimental Genetics
This course includes lectures and laboratory exercises in human and fruit fly genetics. This is not a companion course to BIO 201. Prerequisite: BIO 201 or concurrently, or permission of instructor. Cr 2.

BIO 409 Cell and Molecular Biology
A study of the eukaryotic cell at the level of organelles and molecules. The biochemical aspects of cell growth and reproduction are emphasized. Prerequisites: CHY 115 and either grade of C- or higher in BIO 201 or concurrent enrollment in BIO 201. Cr 3.

BIO 410 Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory
A course in which the techniques of cell fractionation and biochemical analyses are applied to the eukaryotic cell. Prerequisite: BIO 409 or concurrently. Cr 2.

BIO 415 Microbial Ecology
The course begins with an examination of microbial evolution and biodiversity. It then explores the interactions of microorganisms in populations and within communities, and their interactions with other organisms and the environment, including an examination of physiological adaptations and biogeochemical cycles. Prerequisite: grade of C- or higher in BIO 281 or BIO 311 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 416 Microbial Ecology Lab
This is the companion lab course to BIO 415, designed as a hands-on project lab to introduce students to a variety of methods used in microbial ecology. There will be a field, lab, computing and written component to the projects that will be completed during the semester. Microscopic, cell culture, molecular and bioinformatics methods will be employed. Prerequisites: grade of C- or higher in BIO 415 (or equivalent) or concurrent enrollment, or permission of instructor. Cr 2.

BIO 417 Issues in Evolution
This course surveys major issues that motivate current research in evolutionary biology, providing an historical analysis of areas of controversy and alternative points of view within the field. The course is based on selected readings in the theoretical and experimental literature of the field, from primary and classical sources. Prerequisites: grades of C- or higher in BIO 201 and BIO 217; or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 421 Biology Seminar
Weekly oral reports and discussions by students and staff on biological topics of current interest. Prerequisite: 16 hours of biology or permission of instructor. May be repeated. Cr 1 or 2.

BIO 431 Principles of Immunology
An introduction to the fundamentals of immunology, especially as they relate to human diseases. Topics include history of immunology, basic elements of immune systems, principles of natural and acquired immunity, cellular and molecular basis of B cell and T cell development and diversity, and clinical aspects of immunology. Prerequisites: CHY 105 or CHY 115, junior standing, and grade of C- or higher in either BIO 107 or BIO 211; or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

BIO 441 Problems in Biology (Independent Studies)
Independent library or laboratory studies on a special topic as mutually arranged by instructor and student. Prerequisite: by arrangement. Credit arranged.

BIO 442 Honors Thesis in Biology
This class is a continuation of the independent studies on a special topic started in BIO 441. This final semester includes a mid-semester thesis draft, a substantive revised thesis based on feedback, and a concluding public, oral defense. Fulfills University Core Curriculum Capstone requirement. Prerequisite: BIO 441, EISRC, and approval by Biology Dept Chair. Credit 3.

 

Graduate (Back to top)

BIO 501 Animal Physiology
A study of physiological processes and their regulation in animals. Cr 3.

BIO 502 Animal Physiology Laboratory
Laboratory examination of physiological mechanisms in animals. Cr 2.

BIO 505 Animal Behavior
This course is a study of the principles of behavioral organization in vertebrate and invertebrate animals, with emphasis on behavior under natural conditions. Cr 3.

BIO 506 Animal Behavior Laboratory
This course is a laboratory and field examination of behavioral principles in animals. Cr 2.

BIO 507 Molecular Mechanisms of Animal Development
A molecular genetic analysis of animal development focusing on an integrative approach toward understanding the evolution of developmental mechanisms. Cr 3.

BIO 508 Experimental Genetics
This course includes both lectures and laboratory exercises in human and fruit fly genetics. Cr 2.

BIO 509 Cell and Molecular Biology
A study of the eukaryotic cell at the level of organelles and molecules. The biochemical aspects of cell growth and reproduction are emphasized. Cr 3.

BIO 510 Cell and Molecular Biology Laboratory
A course in which the techniques of cell fractionation and biochemical analyses are applied to the eukaryotic cell. Cr 2.

BIO 511 Estuarine Ecology
Integrated lecture/field laboratory course focused on interactions determining the distribution and abundance of life in estuaries. Cr 3.

BIO 515 Microbial Ecology
The course begins with an examination of microbial evolution and biodiversity, and explores the interactions of microorganisms in populations and communities, with other organisms, and with the environment, including an examination of physiological adaptations and biogeochemical cycles. Cr 3.

BIO 516 Microbial Ecology Laboratory
This companion lab course to BIO 515 Microbial Ecology is designed as a hands-on project lab to introduce students to a variety of methods used in microbial ecology. There are field, lab, computer and written components to the projects that will be carried out over the semester. Microscopic, cell culture, molecular, and bioinformatics methods will be employed. Cr 2.

BIO 517 Issues in Evolution
This course surveys major issues that motivate current research in evolutionary biology, providing a historical analysis of active areas of controversy and alternative points of view. The course is based on selected readings in the theoretical and experimental literature of the field, from primary and classical sources. Cr 3.

BIO 545 Advanced Pathophysiology
This course is a study of the physiological, genetic, biochemical, and environmental basis of diseases. Systems to be covered include reproductive, gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, and skeletomuscular. Cr 3.

BIO 601 Research Methods in Biology
This course introduces students to faculty members' research. Students will study the philosophy of science, experimental design, data analysis and interpretation, and writing and assessment of scientific papers. Cr 3.

BIO 602 Ethical Issues in Biology
This course examines a variety of ethical issues arising in biology today, including those related to general scientific research, biotechnology, medicine, and the environment. Cr 2.

BIO 611 Endocrinology
This course examines hormone action in animals and plants at the molecular, cellular, organ, and organismal levels. Topics will include the endocrine control of development, behavior, and physiological processes. Cr 3.

BIO 615 Plant Metabolism
This is an advanced course on the regulation and integration of metabolism as viewed from a whole plant perspective. The course deals with primary metabolic pathways such as respiration, photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, and carbohydrate and lipid biosynthesis. Compartmentation of metabolic pathways and communication between cells, tissues, and organs via transport systems are discussed. Cr 3.

BIO 621 Graduate Seminar
This course reviews the literature pertinent to topics of biology. It may be repeated for credit as topics vary. Graduate students must complete at least two different seminars. Cr 1-3.

BIO 650 Internship
In this course, students apply their learning to a practical context under supervision of a faculty member. Cr 1-3.

BIO 660 Graduate Independent Study
Independent work on a special topic as arranged by the student, advisor, and committee. Cr 1-6.

BIO 698 Thesis Research
This course involves thesis research and preparation. It may be repeated for credit, but no more than six credits will apply to the degree. Enrollment is required each term in which the thesis is in progress. Cr 1-6.

BIO 699 Literature Review
This course involves preparation of a review paper based on current biological literature. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate advisor. Cr 1-6.

GRS 602 Thesis Completion
See the complete course description in the "Continuous Enrollment and Residency" section of the Academic Policies chapter. Cr 1.