2013-14 Catalogs

The Lewiston Common Core

The Lewiston Common Core

Students matriculated in a major offered at Lewiston-Auburn College will complete the Lewiston Common Core curriculum requirements.

Vision and Goals

The Lewiston Common Core Curriculum (LCC) provides a coherent, integrative, and rigorous liberal education that enables our graduates to be world-minded, intentional, life-long learners.  It systematically fosters the values and dispositions, knowledge, and skills that prepare students for successful citizenship in a complex and dynamic world.

The Lewiston Common Core curriculum is centered upon the question, “How, then, shall we live?” Set within the context of our 21st-century lives, this common course of study provides students opportunities to strengthen their abilities to speak and write thoughtfully and clearly. Students learn to find, evaluate, and utilize information and to think through complex questions in light of their social, cultural, and historical contexts. The curriculum also helps students articulate their values and aspirations, connect their academic study to their personal lives and career choices, and cultivates the habits of mind and heart needed to live lives guided by a sense of social responsibility and ethical citizenship.  

Students consider the themes of justice, difference, sustainability, and democracy in a number of ways and in a variety of contexts over their entire course of study at LAC.  The curriculum integrates the learning experiences in the majors with liberal arts learning in the Common Core. Students practice skills and abilities in critical thinking, communicating, and information literacy that build upon and relate to each other in a cumulative and sequential manner.

The curriculum is organized into a three-phased sequence, with each successive phase focused upon the development and refinement of the student abilities mentioned above. Required courses in writing instruction, for example, occur at successive phases of the curriculum rather than only at the beginning phase. To help students become intentional about their learning, they are required to participate in and reflect upon co-curricular as well as curricular experiences.  Courses in the Lewiston Common Core are equivalent to those in the USM Core.

Lewiston Common Core Course Sequencing

Lewiston Common Core requirements are sequenced. Students should pay attention to the associated course pre- and co-requisites in planning their course of study, particularly with regard to the following:

LCC 123:  College and Community I & LCC 345:  College and Community II
All new, entering students with fewer than 24 transfer credit hours must complete LCC 123 in their first semester.  All new transfer students with 24 transfer credits or more must complete LCC 345 in their first or second semester.   Pre- or co-requisite: College Writing.

LCC 110/111:  College Writing
All students must complete a College Writing course, either at USM LAC or in transfer. College writing is a pre or co-requisite for the LCC 123, LCC 345, other LCC courses and courses in the majors.

LCC 150:  Statistics for Informed Decision Making
Students must meet USM’s mathematics readiness requirement before registering for LCC 150.   LCC 150 is a prerequisite for LCC 130 The Biology of Human Health and/or LCC 230 Environmental Science, Policy and Sustainability.

Diversity & International
Students must complete two distinct courses to satisfy the Diversity and International requirements.  Courses that satisfy the Diversity and International requirements may also satisfy major requirements.  Study abroad involving an academic experience may be used to satisfy the International requirement.

Thematic Clusters
Thematic Clusters in the Lewiston Common Core provide students opportunities to explore the concepts and concerns of professions that integrate different disciplinary knowledge and perspectives. Prerequisites for courses in the Thematic Clusters vary by course. Please check the individual course listing in Maine Street for course-specific prerequisites. Satisfying the thematic cluster requirement involves successfully completing any three courses in the cluster, from at least two different prefixes. Only one of these courses may overlap with the student’s major requirements. A minor may substitute for a cluster if it requires at least fifteen (15) credit hours. Only one-third (1/3) of the credits in the student’s minor may be courses that can be applied to the student’s major. Students taking a double major for which they have to earn at least 15 credits outside their first major will, by completing both majors, fulfill their Thematic Cluster requirement.

LCC 480:  Senior Seminar
Prerequisites include LCC 370: Toward a Global Ethics.  

Lewiston Common Core

Entry Phase

Credits

     LCC 110 College Writing: Language and Literacies

3

          or LCC 111 College Writing: Language and Literacies: Enrichment

4

    LCC 123 College and Community I*

3

     LCC 130 The Biology of Human Health w/Lab**

4

          or LCC 230 Environmental Science, Policy, and Sustainability w/Lab

 

     LCC 150 Statistics for Informed Decision Making

3

     LCC 200 Creative Critical Inquiry into Modern Life

4

     LCC 220 U.S. Democracy: Origins and Development

3

          or LCC 320 Sustaining Democracy

 

     LCC 250 Thinking About The Arts, Thinking Through The Arts

3

Middle Phase

 

     Thematic Cluster (below) or any Minor offered at USM***

9

          Public Health

 

          Expressive Arts/Healing Arts

 

          The Environment: Sustainability and Education

 

          Leadership

 

          Leadership and Innovation

 

          Early Childhood Education and Studies

 

          Resilience and Vulnerability

 

A History of the Universe:  From the Big Bang to Globalization

 

     LCC 345 College and Community II*

3

     LCC 370 Toward a Global Ethics (writing instruction)

4

     Diversity & International Courses

6

Capstone Phase

 

     LCC 480 Senior Seminar (writing instruction)

3

* LCC 123 is required for entering students with less than 24 credits while LCC 345 is required only of students who were not required to take LCC 123.

** LCC 130 is not required for Natural and Applied Sciences majors.

*** Requirement may be met with any Thematic Cluster, or with any USM minor or double major.

Lewiston-Auburn College: Common Core Courses

LCC 110 College Writing: Language and Literacies
This first-tier writing instruction course introduces students to one or more themes of the Core curriculum. It emphasizes the connections between reading and writing, and students learn how thinking and the language that conveys it develop and change through the process of drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. The course introduces students to the conventions of expository academic writing and links to co-curricular activities of the Core. (Note that some students are also required to concurrently take the 1-credit companion course, LCC 111) This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3.

LCC 111 College Writing: Language and Literacies: Enrichment
This course is required for those students identified as needing extra support to improve their writing skills. The course provides additional instruction and extended opportunities for applying pre-writing, drafting/developing, revising, and editing strategies related to the same essays assigned in LCC 110. The course focus includes attention to basic elements of effective writing, such as unity, coherence, and emphasis. Class time will also be devoted to addressing topics that represent the most common error patterns in college-level academic writing, such as weak thesis sentences, inconsistent point of view, and sentence-level grammar and punctuation error patterns. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4.

LCC 123 College and Community I
This course is required of all entering students with less than 24 credit hours. The course introduces students to the promise and possibilities of USM LAC's interdisciplinary, writing-intensive, and student-centered culture. Students will consider the relevance the four themes of the Lewiston Common Core (justice, sustainability, democracy and difference) have to their future lives. Students link their own "stories" -- what has brought them to this point in their personal, academic, and professional lives -- with the habits of mind needed for success in college, career, and global citizenship. Cr. 3.

LCC 130 The Biology of Human Health with Lab
This course introduces basic concepts of biology and explores how these concepts relate to human health. It also explores natural scientific methods of inquiry and applies these methods to complex issues involving the creation and maintenance of human health. Further, the course explores the importance of societal factors in health maintenance. Prerequisite: QR. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4.

LCC 150 Statistics for Informed Decision Making
This course introduces and applies quantitative analyses to address real world questions. It applies descriptive statistics, sampling and significance testing, correlation, and regression analysis to issues related to the four themes of the Common Core. The course provides the opportunity to interpret and analyze statistical decision making, and identifies data misconceptions and misuses. Prerequisite: math proficiency. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3.

LCC 200 Creative Critical Inquiry into Modern Life
This writing instruction course introduces students to criteria for identifying and constructing well-reasoned arguments, fosters the discovery and the use of students’ critical/analytical voice in their writing, and develops skills for incorporating, interpreting and integrating the views of others. It provides the opportunity to refine critical thinking abilities by analyzing everyday life experience, including how culture shapes our sense of reality and ourselves. The course highlights the importance of generating good questions and tolerating ambiguity when seeking to understand complex issues. Prerequisite: College Writing. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4.

LCC 220 U.S. Democracy: Origins and Development
In this course, students consider the convergence of cultures, events, and ideas that led to the founding of the United States as a republic up to 1877. The course explores the basic structure of the U.S. system of government, the primary political philosophies that undergird it, and past efforts made to remedy injustices that ran counter to the ideals of democracy. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Offered fall. Cr 3.

LCC 230 Environmental Science, Policy, and Sustainability with Lab
This course presents a multidisciplinary survey of the scientific principles underlying energy utilization, nutrient cycles, global warming, population, and natural resource policy and management. The lectures will be comprised of Socratic interactions and group discussions relating regional, national, and global components that encompass ecology, economics, politics, and social endeavors. This course includes a laboratory involving field and lab work and service learning efforts. Prerequisite: QR. Offered spring. Cr 4.

LCC 250 Thinking about the Arts, Thinking through the Arts
This course explores the tools and strategies important in the interpretation of literature and the arts and encourages an appreciation of the role of literature and the arts in social, political, and cultural life. It promotes an understanding of and an appreciation for the creative expression of shared cultural beliefs in various historical periods of cultures around the world and examines literature and the arts as potential critiques of culture. Co-curricular opportunities are included, especially in connection with the Atrium Gallery. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3.

LCC 320 Sustaining Democracy
This course focuses primarily on the United States from 1877 to the present, exploring the various ways that U.S. democracy has become more inclusive since the late nineteenth century and the ways in which it has failed to live up to its ideals. The course also explores past and current obstacles to the creation and maintenance of a healthier democracy. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Offered spring. Cr 3.

LCC 345 College and Community II
This middle phase course serves as the point of entry for students transferring into USM LAC with greater than 24 credit hours and is not required of students who have taken LCC 123. This course introduces students to the promise and possibilities of USM LAC's interdisciplinary, writing-intensive, and student-centered culture. The course orients students to the four themes of the Lewiston Common Core (justice, sustainability, democracy and difference). In addition, the course captures LAC's commitment to the study and enhancement of the Lewiston-Auburn community. Cr. 3.

LCC 370 Toward a Global Ethics
This writing instruction course assists students in articulating and assessing their own values. It examines the range of ethical theories and positions and explores the influence of particular cultural ideologies on ethical beliefs. The course considers the ethical principles implied by democracy, sustainability, justice, and difference. It examines ethical issues and dilemmas faced by individuals, organizations, and nations while exploring personal and collective decision-making processes in a global context. Prerequisite: College Writing. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4.

LCC 480 Senior Seminar
This course provides writing instruction experience for students from LAC's four degree programs. Students complete a major research and writing project addressing one of the four themes of the Common Core from an interdisciplinary approach. Prerequisite: ENG 100 or LCC 110; LCC 200 or LCC 370; HUM 300, or LOS 300, or SBS 300, or SCI 315. Offered every semester. Cr 3.

Lewiston Common Core Thematic Clusters
Thematic Clusters in the Lewiston Common Core provide students opportunities to explore the concepts and concerns of professions that integrate different disciplinary knowledge and perspectives.   The clusters encourage students to integrate their learning by juxtaposing competing and complementary ways of framing complex issues and problems at an advanced level. Satisfying the thematic cluster requirement involves successfully completing any three courses in the cluster, from at least two different prefixes. Only one of these courses may overlap with your major requirements. 

 In completing their thematic cluster, students will

  • develop a broader and more comprehensive knowledge of the concepts and concerns of a profession; 
  • understand and articulate orally and in writing how subjects are approached and framed from different disciplinary perspectives;
  • gather, interpret and use information at a level appropriate to the courses in the cluster.

 

Public Health Cluster
The Public Health cluster provides students with an introduction to the multitude of public health concerns facing Maine and the world and increases their ability to apply pertinent theoretical and practical knowledge to contribute to a safe and functioning society. Professions that utilize knowledge of public health include medical and allied health and human services, mental health, gerontology, and child and family support. Public health approaches address the full spectrum of services, planning and evaluation. The cluster will also strengthen the pursuit of graduate study in Public Health and Policy.

One course required of all students: 

  • SBS or SCI 336 Introduction to Public Health (offered every Fall)

Choice of two from following list:

  • SBS 304 Food, Culture and Eating
  • SBS 308 Health, Illness, and Culture
  • SBS 335 Legal Issues in Health and Human Services (offered every Fall)
  • SBS or SCI 337 Introduction to Epidemiology  (offered every Spring)
  • LOS or SBS 436 Risk, Public Policy, and Society
  • SCI 315 Environmental Health
  • One or two Public Health-Relevant Nursing course based at LAC – pending 

Expressive Arts/ Healing Arts Cluster
The Expressive Arts/Arts of Healing cluster provides students with an introduction to the arts and how they can be used therapeutically in clinical, educational and community settings. Students learn how use creative writing, the visual arts, music and other forms of art as healing modalities and/or how to incorporate the creative arts into classroom work with children. This cluster can be taken by students interested in pursuing graduate study in counseling, education, expressive therapy, clinical social work, rehabilitation services, and occupational therapy to enhance their skills and understanding of the role of the expressive arts in therapy and healing. 

One course required of all students: 

  • SBS 364 – Exploring Expressive Therapies

Choice of two from following list:

  • HUM 105 – Photography
  • HUM 201 – Creative Writing
  • HUM 230-Digital Photography
  • HUM 295 - Creative Expression Is Drawing
  • HUM 290 - Thinking and Writing; Writing and Healing
  • HUM/SBS 349 - Trauma and Narrative
  • SBS/HUM 366 - Transforming Words: Poetry and Psychology
  • HUM 307 - Creative Nonfiction
  • SBS 367 - Healthy Learners

The Environment: Sustainability and Education
The Environment:  Sustainability and Education Cluster introduces students to the skills and policy development approaches needed by professionals working in the field of environmental education.  Sustainability is an emerging goal for the 21st century that impacts all human activities and is a key tenent of a responsible approach to the environment. This cluster is intended primarily for students interested in assuming educational and leadership roles in society's pursuit of sustainability. SCI 360 Environmental Issues/Sustainability

  • SCI 421 Natural Resource Policy
  • LOS 322 Public Leadership
  • LOS 440 Organizational Change and Development 
  • SCI 240 Applied Botany 
  • SCI 355 Ecology
  • SCI 399 Zoology
  • SCI 450  Methods of Teaching Science
  • LAE 320  Applied Skills

Leadership
The Leadership cluster is an interdisciplinary introduction geared toward anyone interested in developing and expanding their leadership knowledge, skills, and practice, meeting head-on the challenges of our dramatically changing world, and improving the quality and diversity of leadership in organizations and communities -- regionally, nationally and internationally.  Theories, research and techniques of group and organizational leadership are examined with an emphasis in linking theory and practice.  As a socially constructed phenomenon, leadership will be explored as an activity and process, not a position. 

Two courses required of all students:

  1. LOS 300 - Organizational Theory
  2. LOS 350 – Leadership

Choice of one from the following list:

  • SBS 300 - Deviance & Social Control
  • SBS 311 - Theories of Personality
  • SBS 303 – Abnormal Psychology
  • HUM 330 - Labor, Literature & the Arts

Leadership and Innovation
In today’s rapidly changing world, leaders must be effective and innovative problems solvers able to strategically negotiate increasingly complex environments.  The Leadership and Innovation cluster provides students with an introduction to important factors influencing organizational innovation and the skills one may hone to optimize creative potential.  The unique interdisciplinary approach in this cluster will guide students through an examination of how knowledge of relevant theory and best practices can help them develop a better grasp on creative thinking, acceptability finding, and innovation implementation.

Two courses required of all students:

  1. LOS 350 - Leadership
  2. LOS 360 Innovation and Organizations

Choice of one from the following list:

  • HUM 316 – New Digital Media Literacies
  • HUM 317 - New media & Social Networking
  • HUM 260 - Media Literacy and Theories of Popular Culture
  • SBS 366 - Transforming Words: Poetry and Psychologies of Change
  • EYE 180 - Exploring Innovation
  • EYE 282 - Communicate: Innovation Engineering II
  • EYE 392 - Commercialize: Innovation Engineering III
  • INV 392 -  Commercialize:  Innovation Engineering III

Early Childhood Education and Studies
The Early Childhood Education and Studies Cluster introduces the skills needed by professionals working with young children and their families in various settings including education and childcare.  These settings include schools and educational institutions such as preschools, as well as in the Birth-Five field of childcare and education. 
One of the following:

  • SBS/HRD 200 Multicultural Human Development
  • SBS 305 Child Development

Two of the following:

  • SBS 309 - Attachment
  • SBS 310 - Childhood and Society
  • SBS 375 - Infant Mental Heath
  • SBS 399 - Resilience in Early Childhood and Across the Lifespan
  • SBS 450 - Assessing Individual Differences in Children
  • EDU 336 - Children's Literature
  • SBS 341 - The Family
  • ECE/SBS 199 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  • HUM 304 - Writing Children’s Literature
  • HUM 370 - Literacy Studies
  • LAC/SBS 340 – Language Acquisition and Literacy development

Resilience and Vulnerability Cluster
The Resilience and Vulnerability cluster provides students with an introduction to the concept of human resilience, i.e., the ability to survive and thrive in adverse circumstances, and its contrasting concept, vulnerability.  This cluster is intended primarily for students outside of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Counseling Concentration, who nevertheless have an interest in understanding the nature of, and contributing factors to, human function and dysfunction.  Students can learn about mental health and illness, and how to build strengths through creative, therapeutic, or community-level interventions.  This cluster has broad relevance to anyone whose career goals involve working with people but especially for human services and policy-oriented fields such as psychology, nursing or medicine, emergency medical response/first responders, public health and policy, and education.

Choose one course from each of the following 3 categories:

Mental health and illness

  • SBS 309 Attachment (can substitute SBS 375 Infant Mental Health)
  • SBS 303 Abnormal Psychology (can substitute PSY 233 Psychopathology)
  • HUM 349 Trauma Narratives
  • SBS 343 Substance Abuse
  • SBS 344 Violence:  Causes and Control

Cultural contributors to resilience and vulnerability

  • SBS 308 Health, Illness, and Culture (can substitute SBS 360 Culture, Behavior, and Personality)
  • HUM Ethnicity, Immigration, and Identity
  • SBS 348 Responding to Mental Health Crisis in the Community

Building resilience

  • HUM 290 Thinking and Writing/Writing and Healing
  • SBS 311 Theories of Personality
  • SBS 367 Healthy Learners
  • SBS 430 Applied Social Policy
  • SBS 364 Introduction to Expressive Arts


Lewiston Auburn College: Career Development Courses

HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369 Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles
In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5.

HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413 Job Search Skills for the 21st Century
In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5.

HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 447 Internship
This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed. This course attunes students to the beauty and power of language and to the way all knowledge is mediated in and through language. It explores how language shapes reality, experience, and identity. It examines ongoing tensions between language as a political tool and language as a form of art. Cr 3.