Community Engagement and Career Development

Career Tools

No matter where you are in your career development we are here to assist you. The following tools are available to support you in this process. 

Career Videos Gallery- NEW!!

Career Exploration

Career Planning

Career Strategies

 

Contact Stacy Stewart, (207) 228-8091 or via email usmcareers@maine.edu with questions or to set-up an appointment.



Career Exploration

Career Assessments

Career Services offers assessments that can help you develop and understand your career goals.

Below you will see an assortment of some of the assessments available to you here at USM. No one assessment will be right for everyone. It is important you talk with Career Services about your options, where you are in your career search, and discuss which of the inventories may be helpful to you as you move forward.

  • Myers Briggs Type Indicator® The inventory helps us understand how we take in information, get energized, make decisions and organize our world. It can be very useful for students, particularly those who are exploring careers and who work in teams and want to better understand how different personalities help balance each other.

  • The Holland Code. There are six categories of interests, but most of us are drawn to only 2 (maybe 3). Career Services can help you to understand what your 2 primary career interests mean, as well as how to use some of the websites available to us to sort through occupations that may feel like a good fit to you!

  • StrengthsQuest Your top 5 talent themes are identified and this is the first step to developing your natural talents into strengths.

If you are interested in learning more about these assessments, please contact Stacy Stewart at usmcareers@maine.edu or 207-228-8091.

 

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Informational Interviews

A professional interview with someone in a field you are interested in investigating or pursuing. Explore the environment, confirm your level of interest and gain valuable information.

Informational Interviews - pdf

Informational Interview Sample Questions - pdf

Importance of Networking - video

 
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Career Exploration Sites

Learn about jobs, working conditions, training and education requirements, earnings, and expected job prospects in a wide range of occupations.

  • The O*NET program is the nation's primary source of occupational information. Its database contains information on hundreds of standardized and occupation-specific descriptors. The database is continually updated by surveying a broad range of workers from each occupation.

  • The Occupational Outlook Handbook is revised every two years by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. The OOH describes what workers do on the job, working conditions, training and education necessary, earnings, and expected job prospects in a wide range of occupations. This site has a wealth of information for the job seeker.

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Career Planning

Interviewing

Interviewing for a job is an exciting component of the career planning process. This is a time for you to get to know the employer, the company and the environment. It is also an opportunity for the employer to understand what skills, abilities, and qualifications you would bring to the position.

Interviewing - Preparation for before, during and after the interview

Interviewing - The How-to’s of Traditional & Behavioral Questions (Coming Soon!)

 

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Job Fairs

These are great opportunities to meet recruiters and potential employers and learn about a range of available jobs. At the fairs, you can gather information and apply for various positions. Treat each job fair as if it is an interview to make that professional impression.

USM Job Fair              Maine Career Center Job Fairs             Maine College Career Consortium

 
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Job Search Tools

Getting the best job that matches your skills, interests and abilities will require know-how and organization. It is the result of determination, persistence and finding resources to guide you through the job search process. Here are a few job search guides, books and websites which may provide guidance as you seek employment.

Job Site Description
USMCareerConnections through the MyUSM Campus Portal for up-to-date job and internship listings from local and regional employers. To see a list of current job openings go to: USMCareerConnections Job Board
Live and Work in Maine Live and Work in Maine serves as the leading resource for students looking to start their careers in Maine – as a USM graduate, we invite you to join ourMaine Career Network!
Maine CareerCenter Job Bank The is the place to start when you're looking for your first job, your next job, a better job — or a whole new career. It's also the place to find information on training and education.
JobsInME Maine employment site for full-time, part-time, summer and temp jobs. Search for jobs or post resumes and help wanted classified ads. Find career advice, job fairs, salary info and more.
LinkedIn

With over 300 million members in over 200 countries - LinkedIn is the largest professional network. 93% of employers use LinkedIn to recruit.

LinkedIn Jobs Leverage the world’s largest professional network to connect with opportunity. Use LinkedIn Jobs to harness the power of your network and get hired. LinkedIn Jobs surfaces insights such as whom you know at a company, providing you an edge in your job search.
Glassdoor Helps you find a job and company you love. Reviews, salaries and benefits from employees. Interview questions from candidates. Millions of jobs.
Indeed Considered the #1 job site, it collects job listings from thousands of websites to assist you in finding the perfect position.
Simply Hired Find jobs in 24 countries in 12 different languages. The site will assist you in locating opportunities and how to be successful. 
 CareerBuilder A national job search site. Fresh job listings posted daily. Have jobs emailed to you. Search by company, industry, state or country to name a few. Get tips and recommendations on your job search and post your resume.
 Book  Graduate to a Great Job: Make Your College Degree Pay Off in Today's Market by David DeLong (2013).
 
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Transferable Skills

What are transferable skills? These are the skills which you developed through past jobs, community involvement, personal and professional projects, classes, parenting, sports, leadership positions, volunteer opportunities, hobbies and many other life experiences. They give you insight on your abilities, allow you to expand your resume and cover letter as well as provide talking points to utilize during interviews.

Transferable Skills Check List

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Career Strategies

Dress for Success

Your attire is a statement of who you are and how you want to be perceived. Dressing appropriately for an interview demonstrates that you have a working knowledge of the industry for which you want to be employed.

Dress for Success

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Job Offers & Acceptance

You have been offered a job, now what? Employers expect professionals to negotiate; it’s all part of the hiring process. It’s how you demonstrate your worth to an organization, and how an organization acknowledges that worth!  

Negotiating

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Networking

Networking is a strategic activity that involves building and maintaining relationships with people who can assist you in advancing your job search. These people can provide you with information about possible positions or refer you to others within the field. While your network can include a wide range of people, the closer they are to sharing your career interests, the more helpful they will be.

Networking

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