Health: Behavioral Health

Mental Health Status and Access to Health Care Services for Adults in Maine

Abstract: 

Maine people with poor mental health describe significant challenges with affordability and access to health care.  A new report released by the Maine Health Access Foundation (MeHAF) and the University of Southern Maine, Mental Health Status and Access to Health Care Service for Adults in Maine, describes how adults 18 and older in Maine who report depression and poor mental health have many barriers to getting health care. These results have important implications for planning in a time when major changes in health insurance coverage are expected.

Analyzing data from the ongoing federal/state public health survey, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), Dr. Ziller found that adults in Maine experiencing 14 or more mental health bad days are less likely to have a regular health care provider and more likely to report delays in getting needed health care services (for reasons other than cost). Poorer mental health status was associated with higher rates of foregoing needed medical care because of costs; 25 percent those adults experiencing 14 or more mental health bad days reported they were unable to access needed care from a doctor due to cost compared to 7 percent of adults with no mental health bad days.

MeHAF support allows inclusion of additional questions about access to insurance and health care services in the state’s BRFSS, which surveys a random sample of Maine people throughout the year.  Results from the compiled 2012, 2013 and 2014 surveys are included in the report.

 

For more information on the study design and methodology, please contact Erika Ziller, PhD, (207) 780-4615.

Media contact: Barbara Leonard, President & CEO, (207) 620.8266 x102

Suggested Citation: Ziller EC, Leonard B. Mental Health Status and Access to Health Care Services for Adults in Maine. Augusta, ME: Maine Health Access Foundation and USM Muskie School; February, 2017.

The brief is also available for download on the Maine Health Access Foundation website.

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
February 2, 2017
Author: 
URL: 
http://www.mehaf.org/content/uploaded/images/reports-research/MeHAF_MH-Status-Access-Brief-Feb2017_FINAL.pdf

Innovations in Rural Health System Development

Unpublished
Abstract: 

cover photo for Innovations in Rural Health System Development

In an effort to inform and promote local discussions and strategic planning for transforming health and healthcare in rural communities, the Maine Health Access Foundation commissioned the Maine Rural Health Research Center to develop five issue briefs profiling innovative approaches to rural health. The briefs present innovative approaches from Maine and other parts of the United States to the provision of behavioral health services, recruitment and retention of health care workers, service delivery, governance, and health care payment and financing in rural areas. Examples of innovative approaches profiled in the briefs include: the use of new health workers such as community paramedics and community health workers, rural-focused medical education models, alternative models of emergency care, telehealth, care coordination initiatives, Accountable Care Organizations, and Medicaid Accountable Communities.

The aim of these briefs is to assist rural communities and regions to proactively envision and develop strategies for transforming rural health in the state. In preparing these briefs the Maine Rural Health Research Center consulted experts, interviewed key informants, and reviewed the professional and research literature to find robust and innovative models and strategies that could be replicated in rural Maine.

Suggested citations:

Burgess A, Coburn A. Innovations in Rural Health System Development: Maine’s Behavioral Health Services. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, MaineRural Health Research Center; November 2016.

Burgess A, Coburn A. Innovations in Rural Health System Development: Recruiting and Retaining Maine’s Health Care Workforce. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine,Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center; November 2016.

Burgess A, Coburn A. Innovations in Rural Health System Development: Service Delivery Advances in Care Coordination, Emergency Care, and Telehealth. Portland, ME: University of SouthernMaine. Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center; November 2016.

Kahn-Troster S, Coburn A. Innovations in Rural Health System Development: Governance. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine RuralHealth Research Center; November 2016.

Kahn-Troster S, Coburn A. Innovations in Rural Health System Development: Moving Rural Health Systems to Value-Based Payment. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center; November 2016.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
November 10, 2016
URL: 
http://www.mehaf.org/learning-resources/reports-research/

Understanding the Business Case for Telemental Health in Rural Communities

Unpublished
Abstract: 

Telemental health has been promoted to address long-standing access barriers to rural mental health care, including low supply and long travel distances. Examples of rural telemental health programs are common; there is a less clear picture of how widely implemented these programs are, their organization, staffing, and services. There is also a need to understand the business case for these programs and assess whether and how they might realize their promise. To address these gaps, a national study was conducted of rural telemental health programs including an online survey of 53 programs and follow-up interviews with 23 programs. This article describes the current landscape and characteristics of these programs and then examines their business case. Can rural telemental health programs be sustained within current delivery systems and reimbursement structures? This question is explored in four areas: need and demand, infrastructure and workforce, funding and reimbursement, and organizational fit and alignment. [Journal Abstract]

Suggested Citation: Lambert, D., Gale, J., Hartley, D., Croll, Z., & Hansen, A. (2015). Understanding the business case for telemental health in rural communities. Journal of Behavioral Health Services and Research. doi: 10.1007/s11414-015-9490-7 [epub ahead of print].

FMI: John Gale

Publication Type: 
Journal Article
Publish Date: 
December 22, 2015

Exploring the Business Case for Children's Telebehavioral Health

Abstract: 

This brief, authored by John Gale, M.S. and David Lambert, Ph.D. from the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center, explores terminology, reimbursement and business issues, and provides examples from the field in the development of telebehavioral health services. In the first section, the authors place children’s telebehavioral health within the context and demands of today’s rural healthcare system, where the majority of children’s telebehavioral health services are delivered. They then describe three examples of the use of telebehavioral health to serve children, adolescents, and families in rural communities. The brief concludes by exploring the business case for telebehavioral health including the issues and challenges of service delivery, coordination, and financing. This brief is informed by a national study of telemental health (serving children, adults, and older persons) in rural health systems conducted by the authors and updated to reflect the latest information on three case examples.

For more information, please contact John Gale at john.gale@maine.edu

Suggested citation: Gale J, Lambert D. Exploring the Business Case for Children's Telebehavioral Health. Washington, DC: The Technical Assistance Network for Children's Behavioral Health, The Institute for Innovation & Implementation; March, 2015. Brief.

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
March 2, 2015
Author: 

Telemental Health in Today's Rural Health System

Unpublished
Abstract: 

Telemental health has long been promoted in rural areas to address chronic access barriers to mental health care. While support and enthusiasm for telemental health in rural areas remains quite high, we lack a clear picture of the reality of telemental health in rural areas, compared to its promise. This Research & Policy Brief reports on the first part of our study—the online survey of 53 telemental health programs—and describes the organizational setting, services provided, and the staff mix of these programs. We draw from our telephone interviews with 23 of these programs to help describe the organizational context of telemental health programs. 

Key Findings:

  • The scope and volume of services provided are often modest suggesting that the business case for these programs may be weaker than the clinical case.
  • The programs in our study were able to secure funding and other supports to implement services, but their ability to maintain and expand services to address unmet need is less certain.
  • Telemental health primarily addresses issues related to the distribution of providers and travel distances to care. However, there are underlying practice management issues, common to all mental health practices in rural areas, which pose challenges to the scope and sustainability of telemental health, including reimbursement, provider recruitment and retention, practice economies of scale, high rates of uninsurance, and high patient “no show” rates.
  • It is becoming increasingly apparent that telehealth technology, by itself, cannot overcome service delivery challenges without underlying reform to the mental health service system.

Suggested Citation:

Lambert, D., Gale, J., Hansen, A. Y., Croll, Z., & Hartley, D. (2013). Telemental health in today's rural health system. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center.

 

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
December 18, 2013
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/Telemental-Health-Rural.pdf

Adolescent Alcohol Use: Do Risk and Protective Factors Explain Rural-Urban Differences?

Unpublished
Abstract: 

Adolescent alcohol use is a significant public health problem among U.S. adolescents. Past studies, including our own work, have found that rural adolescents were more likely to use alcohol than urban adolescents. Research suggests that protective factors, such as peer and parental disapproval, may be weaker among youth living in rural areas. This study examines the factors associated with adolescent alcohol use, whether they differ between rural and urban populations, and the extent to which these differences account for rural-urban variations in adolescent alcohol use. This knowledge is crucial to the development of rural-specific prevention strategies, targeted research on rural adolescent alcohol use, and long-term policy interventions. Our findings confirm higher rates of binge drinking and driving under the influence among rural youth than among urban youth. Rural residence is associated with increased odds of binge drinking (OR 1.16, p< .05) and driving under the influence (OR 1.42, p< .001) even when income and protective factors are taken into account. Our findings suggest that adolescents who start drinking at an earlier age are more likely to engage in problem drinking behavior as they get older, leading to a need for interventions that target pre-teens and younger adolescents. Moreover, since we found urban-rural differences in specific protective factors, these may be the most promising for evidence-based, rural-specific prevention strategies targeting parents, schools, and churches. These are the factors that convey and reinforce consistent messages discouraging adolescent alcohol use from an early age.

Suggested Citation:

Gale JA, Lenardson JD, Lambert D, Hartley, D.  Adolescent Alcohol Use: Do Risk and Protective Factors Explain Rural-Urban Differences. (Working Paper #48).  Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center; March 2012.

Publication Type: 
Working Paper
Publish Date: 
March 1, 2012
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/WP48_Adolescent-Alcohol-Use-Rural-Urban.pdf

Mental Health Services in Rural Long-Term Care: Challenges and Opportunities for Improvement

Abstract: 

Despite high levels of need, individuals in long-term care often fail to receive appropriate mental health services, especially in rural areas. In this Research & Policy Brief (and accompanying Working Paper), we consider challenges and opportunities for improving mental health treatment delivered to long-term care recipients in rural settings. As background, we note the prevalence of mental health problems in long-term care populations, describe deficiencies in the mental health care afforded to long-term care recipients, and identify barriers that hinder the remediation of these deficiencies in rural settings. We also outline a rationale for enhancing mental health services in long-term care. We then discuss new approaches that have been implemented or could be used to effect positive transformations in the delivery of mental health services to rural long-term care populations. We underscore the potential for synergies between these innovations and provisions introduced under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010. Finally, we delineate policy considerations for promoting new mental health service models in rural long-term care settings.

Suggested citation:

Talbot, J.A., & Coburn, A.F. (2013, June). Mental health services in rural long-term care: Challenges and opportunities for improvement. (Research & Policy Brief #50). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center.

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
June 20, 2013
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/Rural-Mental-Health-Services-LTC.pdf

Challenges and Opportunities for Improving Mental Health Services in Rural Long-Term Care

Abstract: 

Despite high levels of need, individuals in long-term care often fail to receive appropriate mental health services, especially in rural areas. In this report (and accompanying Research & Policy Brief), we consider challenges and opportunities for improving mental health treatment delivered to long-term care recipients in rural settings. As background, we note the prevalence of mental health problems in long-term care populations, describe deficiencies in the mental health care afforded to long-term care recipients, and identify barriers that hinder the remediation of these deficiencies in rural settings. We also outline a rationale for enhancing mental health services in long-term care. We then discuss new approaches that have been implemented or could be used to effect positive transformations in the delivery of mental health services to rural long-term care populations. We underscore the potential for synergies between these innovations and provisions introduced under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010. Finally, we delineate policy considerations for promoting new mental health service models in rural long-term care settings.

Suggested citation:

Talbot, J.A., & Coburn, A.F. (2013, June). Challenges and opportunities for improving mental health services in rural long-term care. (Working Paper #50). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
June 20, 2013
Author: 
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/WP50-Rural-Mental-Health-Services-LTC.pdf

Pages

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