Department of English

English Course Descriptions

ENG 100 College Writing
With an emphasis on the connections between reading and writing, English 100 introduces students to practices and conventions of expository academic writing. Students read expository writing and use the ideas they encounter to develop and refine their own arguments and perspectives.  Students learn how thinking and writing change through processes of reading, drafting, rereading, revision, editing, and proofreading.  At the end of the semester, ENG 100 students can demonstrate an understanding of sentence structure and syntax as central to meaning.  Using standard written English, students can compose essays that reflect a point of view, engage with readings, and focus on a central thesis or project. Prerequisite: college readiness in writing. Every semester. Cr 3.

ESL 100 College Writing
This section of College Writing (ENG 100) is intended for non-native speakers of English only. This course focuses on the analysis of professional and student writing in terms of how to use the English language effectively in the academic classroom. The writing assignments encourage students to apply the principles discussed in class to their own work. This course cannot be used to satisfy a Humanities requirement. Prerequisite: ESL 104 or college readiness in writing. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 101 Independent Writing
English 101 is offered as an alternative college writing course for students who prefer to work independently on academic writing with an instructor's guidance. The main business of the course is conducted in individual conferences; therefore, the course is more intensive than ENG 100. This course emphasizes style, sentence structure, organization, and development. The major challenge of the course is the self-discipline that students will need to work independently. Prerequisite: college readiness in writing. This course fulfills the college writing requirement. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 103 A Modular Approach to the Writing Process
This course for college writers in various disciplines is divided into three units or modules, each of which earns one credit hour. Each unit runs for approximately one-third of a semester. Students may enroll in one, two, or all three modules and receive separate grades for each module they complete. The second and third units do not require the earlier unit(s) as prerequisites. Any or all of the units may be taken in conjunction with ENG 100 College Writing. The first unit, "Practical and Descriptive Grammar for College Writers," gives students a thorough knowledge of traditional "prescriptive" grammar and introduces them to modern "descriptive" grammar. The second unit, "Editing, Revising, and Rewriting," focuses on skills in proofreading, editing, revising, and rewriting, and also covers the use of computer programs for writing assistance. The third unit, "Research Skills Across the Disciplines," studies the use of library resources (especially online and other computer databases), documentation and bibliography formats from a range of disciplines, and other techniques crucial to writing analytic research papers. Variable cycle. Cr var.

ENG 140 Reading Literature
An introduction to the premises and techniques of literary analysis.  The course emphasizes the close reading of texts from different historical periods and introduces students to literary conventions and terminology as well as library and Internet resources available for research.  In this course, students will learn to use concepts of the discipline and conventions of academic discourse with an emphasis on critical writing. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 145 Topics in Literature
This course emphasizes oral and written analysis and interpretation of literary and other cultural texts within and across historical contexts.  Though topics vary, each provides a broad introduction to the concepts of literary history and periodization as these are understood within the discipline and familiarizes students with the basic terms and methods of literary analysis. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 245 Introduction to Literary Studies
This is a required course for all English majors. It may be taken concurrently with other 200-level courses in the Department, but is a prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level courses except those in creative writing. The course will have a double focus. Students will be introduced to a variety of methodologies important to an insightful analysis of literature and other cultural texts. They will also learn research procedures and techniques of effective critical writing. Every semester. Cr 3.

Language

ENG 230 Literacy Studies
A course dedicated to examining the history, concepts, and practices of literacy, with readings drawn from socio-linguistics, the social and cultural history of literacy and of print culture, the sociology and history of education, and reader response studies. The course will examine changing concepts of literacy, orality, and illiteracy, with special attention given to the following: the historical, social, and cultural dynamics influencing reading and writing practices; the plurality of literacy practices; and the theoretical debates over the meaning of the word "literacy" itself. Students will also do ethnographic studies of their own literacy practices and the ways in which these differ from one social context to another. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 330 History of the English Language
This course includes a survey of the prehistory of the language as well as a detailed study of Old, Middle, Early Modern, and Modern English and the forces that shaped these stages. Some methods of modern linguistic science are utilized in examining current usage. Change and development of the language are emphasized. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 331 Modern Grammars
Designed to acquaint students with the three most common forms of English grammatical analysis: traditional, structural, and post-generative/transformational. The mechanics of the various analyses will be examined, and comparisons will be made to determine what tentative combination best explains the structure of English. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 336 Old English Language and Literature
An introduction to the grammar of English in the earliest period, 700-1050. The first several weeks concentrate on grammar and enable students to translate elementary prose (e.g., prefaces by King Alfred, Apollonius, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle). Later weeks introduce students to Anglo-Saxon culture and literature, particularly to alliterative poetry. Major prose and poetic works are studied through looking jointly at Modern English translations and the original works.Beowulf,The Wanderer,Elene, andThe Phoenix are works typically studied. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 337 Studies in Rhetoric
The course will introduce students to the many ways of thinking about rhetoric throughout history and stress the value of rhetorical criticism in analyzing texts, discourse, and language. Topics will vary, but may survey theories of rhetoric from Plato and Aristotle to Campbell and Nietzsche or examine contemporary theoretical approaches to rhetoric, ranging from the neo-Aristotelian, dramaturgical, experiential and sociolinguistic to the postmodern. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 338 Studies in Language
Under this title is offered a variety of topics on language which include the following: linguistic approaches to literary analysis; language and culture; grammatical structure in English and related languages; and the history of linguistic thought. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 430 Independent Study in Linguistics
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 431 Seminar on Literacy Studies and the Teaching of Writing
The seminar will consider topics in composition theory and practice within the broad context of histories and theories of literacy. Participants will be asked to make connections between curricular design or pedagogical practices and such issues as the history of public education and English studies, theories of discourse, writing and language use, and definitions of literary language and textuality. There will be consideration of contemporary research debates on the teaching of writing. This seminar is required for students enrolled in the Internship on the Teaching of Writing. Fulfills the general education capstone requirement.  Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

ENG 432 Internship in the Teaching of Writing
The Internship will provide qualified upper-class English majors with supervised experience in the teaching of writing. There is also the possibility of placement in tutoring and in community literacy programs. Students registering for the internship must also register for the Seminar on Literacy Studies and the Teaching of Writing. Application and screening for the internship take place through the College Writing Committee. Cr var.

Criticism and Theory Courses

ENG 340 History of Literary Criticism and Theory
An historical study of the key critics and theorists from Plato and Aristotle to the present day. Every year, fall. Cr 3.

ENG 341 Contemporary Critical Theories
An introduction to major schools of literary criticism developed in the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed on identifying points of agreement and divergence between various theories and methods for interpreting literature. Specific theories to be studied may include (but are not limited to) structuralism, psychoanalytic theory, Marxist criticism, deconstruction, feminist theory, and the new historicism. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 342 Topics in Contemporary Theory
This course studies in-depth selected theoretical approaches to literature and culture. It will focus either on a single current theory or, through a comparative method, two to three different theories (e.g., structuralism and formalism, Marxism and cultural criticism, or deconstruction and feminism). May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 440 Independent Study in Literary Criticism and Theory
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 441 Seminar in Literary Criticism and Theory
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Genre and Form

ENG 262 Poetry
This course studies poetry as a way of knowing and experiencing the world, introduces important concepts in analyzing and appreciating poetry, and offers the opportunity for students to develop skills in interpretation, literary analysis, and discussion. While primary attention will be on poetic forms, figurative languages and the poetic "canon," it will also consider the relationship between historical context and changes in poetic form in various periods. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 263 Fiction
This course will introduce important concepts in analyzing fiction and enable students to develop skills in interpretation, literary analysis, and discussion. It will focus on narrative forms and rhetorical structures (such as voice, plot, diction, figurative language) in various historical periods, and will both examine and challenge the concept of genre. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 264 Performance Genres
This course will study dramatic performance from its roots in cultural ritual to its historical development in drama as well as its more contemporary manifestations in television and film. Students will investigate the social functions of performance in several cultures and epochs, focusing on conventions of language and stagecraft, dramatic experimentation, and technical innovation. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 318 Autobiography
This course will focus on autobiographical forms with emphasis on the emergence and development of the genre. Possible topics include American autobiography, medieval lives, and the confession. The course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 319 Studies in Genre and Form
The content of this course is flexible, but will focus upon some aspect or dimension of genre studies not treated through other course rubrics. Possible topics include women and the romance, the vampire novel and popular culture, or the novel of sensation. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 378 The Novel of Self Development
Originally developed in German literature, the novel of self-development or Bildungsroman depicts an adolescent male who eventually acquires a philosophy of life based on his conscious effort to gain personal culture. This course investigates the changes the idea ofBildung underwent at the hands of various authors in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in their adaptation of the original form, including the revision of selfhood to address the Bildung as a female as well as a male province. Works to be considered may include Goethe'sWilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, Bronte'sJane Eyre, Dickens'David Copperfield, Joyce'sPortrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 418 Independent Study in Genre and Form
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 419 Seminar in Genre and Form
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Writing Courses

ENG 201 Creative Writing
An introduction to the principles and practices of writing fiction and poetry; other genres may be added at the discretion of the instructor. Students will be exposed to a variety of writing modes through exercises and engagement with literary texts. Emphasis is on using imaginative and precise language, on developing critical skills through workshops, and on assembling a portfolio of revised student writing. Prerequisites: College writing or equivalent and ENG 120. Every semester.
Cr 3.

ENG 202 Memoir and Autobiography
This course offers orientation in the technique of narrative autobiographical writing. Using journal writing, observational writing, and free writing techniques, students will learn to access story material from memory and develop a personal writing practice. They will be assigned readings in memoir and autobiography, and will assemble a portfolio of essays and personal writings. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 203 Topics in Writing
A course for prospective writers interested in studying the stories, novels, poems, biographies, memoirs, and letters of established writers, with an eye to learning aspects of craft, technique, and the creative process from a close and focused inspection of key facets of their works and lives. Areas of study will vary from semester to semester, but will include close textual reading and practice in both creative and expository writing. Every spring. Cr 3.

ENG 300 Fiction Writing
A course for those who, in a creative writing course or on their own, have written several pieces of fiction and are ready for more advanced work. Emphasis will be on writing well-developed short stories and on understanding the basic elements of fiction. A better-than-average competence in using English is required. Prerequisite: ENG 201. Every spring. Cr 3.

ENG 301 Poetry Writing
A course for those who, in a creative writing course or on their own, have developed basic skills of reading and revising poetry, and who are interested in developing a sense of how poetry has been written in the past by major poets and how it is being created in the present. Emphasis will be on imitation of past and present writers, exercises that stress the elements of poetry, and the development of personal approaches. Prerequisite: ENG 201. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 302 Fiction Workshop
An advanced course requiring the completion of at least two short stories or a substantial part of a novel. Prerequisites: ENG 300 or instructor's permission. May be repeated for three additional credits with instructor's permission. Every fall.
Cr 3.

ENG 303 Poetry Workshop
A course for advanced students who, after experimenting with different approaches and styles, are developing their own themes and voices as poets. Work toward a completed chapbook-length manuscript or portfolio of poems will be the basis for the course grade. Prerequisite: ENG 301 or instructor's permission. May be repeated for three additional credits with instructor's permission. Every spring. Cr 3.

ENG 304 Advanced Memoir
This course offers orientation and practice in the fundamentals of narrative autobiographical writing. We focus on the use of memory—key scenes, remembered characters, and evocative seasons of life—as source material for the writing of personal essays and autobiographical stories. We work with prose narrative material only (prose material that tells a story, as opposed to analytical essays or expository articles), and the boundaries between fact and invention in this course will necessarily sometimes blur. Readings will be drawn from the works of contemporary writers prominent in the field, from period journals and diaries, and from texts on memoir as a literary genre. May be repeated for three additional credits with instructor's permission. Prerequisite: ENG 202 or permission. Cr 3.

ENG 305 Rhetoric, Syntax, and Style
The course focuses on the fundamentals of sentence-level writing, teaching students the possibilities of English style both for their own prose and for textual analysis. By examining contemporary texts in the context of traditions of rhetoric, students will develop a theoretical grasp of rhetoric, syntax, and style as a basis for editing and revision. Cr 3.

ENG 306 Writing the Novel
This course offers instruction in the preliminary stages of writing a novel, including the uses of synopsis outlines, building well-developed scenes, and experimenting with style, narrative voice, and point of view. Work in class will involve lectures on craft, the critique of student work, and discussions of published texts. Using an expanding synopsis outline, students will produce 50 pages of revised work. Prerequisites: ENG 302 preferred; permission of instructor. May be repeated for three additional credits with instructor's permission. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 309 Newswriting
This course covers the basics of news-story writing for the print media with intensive practice in news gathering, background research, interviewing, covering a beat, covering social and political issues, and consideration of ethical and legal issues related to American journalism. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 400 Independent Study in Creative or Expository Writing
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 401 Writing Minor Thesis
The student, working in collaboration with a faculty advisor, produces a thesis of 10—15 poems or 25—50 pages of fiction or non-fiction. The thesis may be multi-genre, by the student's choice. Prerequisites: ENG 302, 303, 304, or 306. Cr. 1.

ENG 409 Internship in Professional Writing
By application to the Department and arrangement with campus or local newspaper or journal. Prerequisite: ENG 309 or 310, or permission of the Department. Every semester. Cr var.

ENG 410 Independent Study in Journalism
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 411 Seminar in Journalism
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Interdisciplinary and Cultural Studies

ENG 244 Introduction to Cultural Studies
This course introduces students to the history, concepts, and methods of cultural studies. Students will read a variety of critical texts from a number of different theoretical perspectives, including semiotics, Marxian theory, psychoanalytic theory, gender studies, and cultural anthropology, and will also read selected texts from specific areas of cultural analysis, such as television studies or film theory. The course examines specific aspects of past or present popular cultures. Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 310 Topics in Journalism
Under this rubric the English Department will offer a variety of advanced courses which have journalistic writing as a major component of the course work. Topics include American culture and world communication, and the right to privacy. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: ENG 309. Cr 3.

ENG 344 Sex/Gender and Sexuality
This course will investigate sex/gender and sexuality as analytic categories for understanding culture. Through a consideration of both history and theory, the course will explore different models for understanding sex/gender and sexuality, including their interaction with other categories of difference such as race and class. It will also explore the effect of these models on our understanding of literature, mass culture, theories of identity, and contemporary social life. Every spring. Cr 3.

ENG 345 Racial Formations
Guided by the concept of "racial formations," this course will foreground the definition of "race." It will ask questions about whether race is a biological or discursive category, about the relationship between race and identity, and about how racial identity is informed by class, gender, sexuality, and other socio-historical "formations." Course materials may include literature, film, criticism and theory, scientific and historical readings, and popular culture texts such as television, video, and music. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 346 Language, Literature and the Politics of Identity in Contemporary Ireland
An examination of the relations among literature, language and the politics of identity in Ireland today. Readings will include political, historical, and cultural materials from various communities of discourse competing to shape Irish identity for the twenty-first century, including traditional republicanism and unionism, new nationalism, historical revisionism, feminism, and consumer capitalism. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 347 Topics in Cultural Studies
This course explores specific cultural practices of the past and present. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the different ways in which popular culture has been analyzed and the ways in which different popular cultures have sustained themselves. Although topics courses will vary in subject matter, they will all share the common objective of examining the ways in which a given culture makes sense of itself. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 348 Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies
This course investigates literature in relation to other disciplines, with an emphasis on how various fields of knowledge contextualize and elucidate our understanding of literary production. Topics may vary and include, for example, anthropology and drama, Freud and literature, literature and technology, and parallel movements in art and/or music and literature. Because of the diverse range of interdisciplinary studies, material is drawn from film, video, music, and art, as well as from printed texts. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 444 Independent Study in Interdisciplinary and Cultural Studies
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 445 Seminar in Interdisciplinary and Cultural Studies
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Historical—Ancient and Biblical

ENG 315 Ancient Literature
The course will vary between being focused on Greek and Roman literature and on literatures outside the Mediterranean/Aegean ancient world. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 316 The Bible
The Bible, arguably the single most influential work (or group of works) in Western culture, will be studied as a literary text, with emphasis on selected books that have had the greatest literary influence, including Genesis, Exodus, Psalms, Job, and the Gospels. The course may also discuss the history of the texts, problems of translation, and/or influence. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 317 Studies in Ancient and Biblical Literature and Culture
Some topics studied in this course take a comparative approach to ancient and biblical literatures, including that of the Graeco-Roman civilization, but are not limited to classical texts. Other topics take a more narrow approach and may involve combined studies of ancient and/or biblical literature and the culture of a later period. Possible topics include "The Late Classical Era through Christian Antiquity," "The Bible and Early Western Literatures and Cultures," "Women Writers of Antiquity," and "Images of Women in Ancient Literature." May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 415 Independent Study in Ancient and Biblical Literature and Culture
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

Historical—Medieval

ENG 320 Continental Literature
Readings in major works from the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century. Texts typically include some or all of the following: Augustine'sConfessions, Boccaccio'sDecameron, Petrarch'sSonnets, Dante'sDivine Comedy, Machiavelli'sThe Prince, Marguerite de Navarre'sHeptameron, Montaigne's Essays. All texts are read in modern translations. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 325 Epic and Romance
This course will focus on the emergence and development of Epic and Romance. Possible topics include "the Epic," "Arthurian Romance," and "Medieval Epic and Romance." The course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 350 Medieval English Literature
A survey of genres popular from the twelfth to the fifteenth centuries (including debates, lyrics, romances, allegories, drama), with emphasis on literature of fourteenth-century England. Major readings will typically include Chaucer'sTroilus,The Pearl, andSir Gawain and the Green Knight. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 351 Chaucer and the Medieval World
An exploration of Chaucer's historical, philosophical, and literary world through his major comic narrative,Canterbury Tales. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 352 Medieval Drama
This course will introduce the theater of the medieval world, which ranges from the liturgical, ritual drama of the church, to the morality plays—performed by traveling companies—and the mystery cycles, produced by civic and guild pride in the fifteenth century. Tudor plays of the early sixteenth century may also be read. Attention will be paid to the aesthetic and theological principles underlying the conjunction of farce and high seriousness in the plays, as well as to distinctly medieval techniques of staging and production. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 353 Medieval Women Writers
The course focuses on women writing in various discursive milieux during the long period between the third and the sixteenth centuries. Writers include literate nuns, female courtly love lyricists, laywomen mystics, the first professional woman writer Christine de Pizan, and women dramatists. Non-English texts will be read in modern translation. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 354 Studies in Medieval Literature and Culture
This course explores literature and culture ranging from the fifth and sixth centuries through the late fifteenth century. Some topics that may recur include Anglo-Latin and Anglo-French literature and scholarship; feminist studies of medieval culture; and allegory, symbol, and sign. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 450 Independent Study in Medieval Studies
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 451 Seminar in Medieval Studies
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Historical—Renaissance

ENG 355 English Renaissance Literature and Culture
A survey of major genres and writers of the English Renaissance. The course is concerned with the historical context of the production and reception of Renaissance texts. Emphasis is on how sixteenth and seventeenth century innovations in formal techniques are related to cultural and institutional change. Typical writers will include More, Spenser, Marlowe, Wroth, Sidney, Shakespeare, Lanier, Donne, and Milton. Topics and issues covered include gender and the erotic, humanism and power, religion, imperialism, social hierarchy, and notions of selfhood. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 357 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama
A study of selected plays from the English Renaissance. The course may focus on a particular theme, genre, sociopolitical issue, or author. Typical topics include theater and the state, unruly women, magic and witchcraft, the construction of the "other," and rebellion. Playwrights typically included are Kyd, Marlowe, Dekker, Webster, Middleton, and Jonson. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 360, 361 Shakespeare
ENG 360 and 361 each feature close reading of five to seven Shakespearean plays, and focus attention both on theatrical and philosophical meanings. Both courses include tragedies and comedies; neither is introductory nor prerequisite to the other. ENG 360 often includes a section on Shakespeare's history plays, while ENG 361 includes a section on Shakespeare's "romances." Every semester. Cr 3.

ENG 362 Studies in Shakespeare
An advanced course in Shakespeare that emphasizes the application of various critical and scholarly approaches to important aspects of the poet and dramatist's work. Typical subjects include allegorical elements in Shakespeare's plays; Shakespeare and the daemonic; Shakespeare and computers; Shakespeare and popular culture; Shakespeare, theater, and the state; Shakespeare's sources; Shakespeare, gender, and sexuality. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 363 Studies in the Renaissance
Selected topics and writers from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The course may focus on an author, genre, historical moment, socio-historical problem, or discursive practice. Typical topics include popular culture, the "New Science," pastoral and politics, literature of "New World" exploration and colonization, the market, the English Civil War. Courses will typically study the relation of diverse practices of writing or generic conventions to the social and political order of Renaissance England. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 455 Independent Study in the Renaissance
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 456 Seminar in the Renaissance
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Historical—Eighteenth Century

ENG 370 Literature of Discovery, Exploration, and Colonialism
Focusing upon literatures of the Atlantic, this course examines literary, historical, and discursive connections between European, Creole, and indigenous cultures in the early period of European expansion. Topics to be explored include the commercial, religious, and scientific origins of European exploration, "New World" representations, and the social organization of colonialism. Because area of inquiry will be determined by the instructor, this course may also satisfy the Renaissance requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for specific descriptions. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 379 Earlier Women Writers
This course focuses upon the efforts of women writers in the early modern period to create, negotiate, and contest the terms of a developing literary culture. Depending on content, which varies, ENG 379 may also satisfy the Renaissance or nineteenth-century category requirement. In all cases, instructors will attend to the successes and limitations of gender as a category of analysis. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

Historical—Eighteenth Century American Literature

ENG 367 Literature and Culture of the Early Republic
Focusing upon representative early American texts, this course considers questions of revolution, the transition from colonialism, emergent nationalisms, and constructions of citizenship within the context of the American War for Independence and the ensuing years of the Early Republic. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 368 Studies in Eighteenth-Century American Literature and Culture
More specialized than ENG 367, this course offers the opportunity for intensive focus upon a single genre, author, issue, or historical moment, to be determined by the instructor. Typical topics include science in/and the New World, American nationalisms, the rise of slavery in the colonies, witchcraft and public order, the French Revolution in America, The Great Awakening and women's public life, and colonial autobiography before Franklin. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

Historical—Eighteenth Century British Literature

ENG 365 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture
Focusing mostly upon representative or canonical texts, this is a multi-generic course intended to provide an overview of British literature and culture in the "long" eighteenth century, 1660-1800. Readings will be organized around several of the following cultural and historical issues: political and religious controversies; the role of science and experimentation; the creation of the literary professional; women and the domestic sphere; the growth of the British Empire. Critical and theoretical texts may accompany literary readings. Every fall. Cr 3.

ENG 366 Studies in the Restoration and Eighteenth Century
More specialized than ENG 365, this course offers the opportunity for intensive focus upon a single genre, author, issue, or historical moment to be determined by the instructor. Typical topics include satire and the politics of "wit," the cult of sensibility, theater and anti-theatricality, the eighteenth-century long poem, and seduction and the scandalous memoir. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 369 Emergence of the Novel
The course explores the emergence of the novel as a new literary mode, one both dependent upon and distinguishable from the kinds of prose narrative which are usually described as its origins: journalism, scandalous memoirs, Puritan autobiographies, conduct books, etc. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 465 Independent Study in the Eighteenth Century
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 466 Seminar in the Eighteenth Century
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Historical—Nineteenth Century American Literature

ENG 380 Early Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture
The literature and culture of the United States to the Civil War. While particular writers, works, and theoretical emphases may vary with the instructor, the course will consider historical context and may include canonical and non-canonical texts in a variety of literary and cultural forms: long and short fiction, poetry and song, non-fiction essays, slave narratives, political pamphlets and journalism, and paintings. Possible topics include the growth of female authorship; social reform movements; and the formation and interpretation of the American literary canon. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 382 The Earlier American Novel
The American novel to 1900 with attention to historical context, generic development, and thematic connections between texts. The course may include various types of novels, such as epistolary, gothic, romance, domestic, and realist, as well as canonical and non-canonical writers. Critical and theoretical texts may accompany literary readings. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 383 Studies in African-American Literature and Culture
This course will explore various topics in African-American literature and culture. Specific courses may focus on literary traditions, genres, and themes; literary and cultural periods or movements; theoretical issues in the development or study of African-American literature; or the work of a single author. Possible topics include the slave narrative, African-American non-fiction prose, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, African-American women's writing, African-American literary and cultural theory, Black popular culture. Because reading materials and areas of inquiry will be determined by the instructor, this course may also satisfy the Literatures Since 1900 requirement. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for specific descriptions. Every year. Cr 3.

ENG 384 Late Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture
This course covers the historical period associated with the rise of realism and naturalism in American literature that is traditionally marked by the end of the Civil War and the beginning of World War I. While the course's focus may vary, it will explore the definitions of realism and naturalism with regard to both historical context and aesthetic agendas. In testing definitions of American realism and naturalism, the course may ask questions about whose reality, whose America, and whose intellectual and cultural traditions have shaped our understanding of the literary movements that arose in response to major changes in American society during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 385 Studies in Nineteenth-Century American Literature and Culture
Specific themes, works, or writers prominent in nineteenth-century American literature and culture. The course may focus on a particular literary tradition, genre, or theme; a literary and cultural movement; a theoretical issue in the development or study of nineteenth-century American literature; or the work of a single author. Possible topics include slavery and abolition in American literature, nineteenth-century popular culture, the domestic novel, American Renaissance, and Whitman and Dickinson. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

Historical—Nineteenth Century British Literature

ENG 371 Romantic Writing
A study of major British poets of the Romantic period (1790-1832). Readings will be selected from among the works of William Blake, Helen Maria Williams, Ann Yearsley, Hannah More, William Wordsworth, S.T. Coleridge, John Clare, John Keats, Byron, and Percy Shelley. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 373 Studies in Romantic Literature and Culture
The course will explore themes and issues unique to the Romantic Period, a time of unprecedented change in literature, the arts, and society. Although the content of the course will vary, it will generally include a mixture of literary and cultural forms, including poetry, fiction, nonfictional prose, painting, and drama. Possible themes will include women and Romanticism; Romantic writing and the French Revolution; Romanticism and popular culture; forms of Romantic autobiography; Romantic fiction. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 375 Nineteenth-Century British Novel
A study of the canonical novels produced during the nineteenth century, including texts by the Brontes, Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, and Hardy. The course will examine narrative forms, narrators and narratees, plots and stories; cultural forms such as the literary pen name; the material production of books, serials, and newspaper stories; the cultural predominance of fiction during the period; the cultural production of subjectivity and readership; and the uses and readings of history in fiction. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 376 Victorian Literature and Culture
Victorian writing, including poetry, novels, plays, autobiography, and non-fiction by writers such as the Brontes, the Brownings, Carlyle, Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, George Gissing, Thomas Hardy, Hopkins, John Stuart Mill, the Rossettis and the pre-Raphaelites, Ruskin, Pater, Tennyson, Wilde. Readings will be organized around several of the following Victorian intellectual, ideological, and cultural issues: the relation of Victorianism to neo-classicism, Romanticism, and modernism; the situation of women; theories of gender and sexuality; industrialism; materialism; aestheticism; decadence; scientific and religious controversies; the emergence of psychoanalysis. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 377 Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture
Topics will vary from semester to semester. Sample topics include: Fin de Siecle Literature and Culture; Nineteenth Century Intellectual History and Culture (e.g., Wollstonecraft, John Stuart Mill, Darwin, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud); Victorian Poetry and the Visual Arts; 19th-Century Psychology and Culture; Contemporary Film Appropriations of Victorian Fiction. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 475 Independent Study in the Nineteenth Century
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 476 Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Studies
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Literatures Since 1900

ENG 387 Women Writers Since 1900
This course introduces students to the diverse concerns of modern and contemporary women writers. It could be organized around a thematic, theoretical, or historical question or could be devoted to two or three figures. It may include writers from First and Third world countries, immigrant writers, and writers of the African Diaspora. Every year, spring. Cr 3.

American Literature Since 1900

ENG 391 American Poetry Since 1900
This course will focus on American poetry written since 1900. While primary texts and historical or theoretical emphases will vary with the semester, the course will consider poetic forms and strategies, and relations to literary modernism and to American thematics and traditions. In most semesters, the course will focus on three or four major poets, examining their poetry against a broader poetic and historical context. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 393 The American Novel Since 1900
This course will study various types of novels (such as the realist novel, the social protest novel, the modernist novel, the Gothic novel, and the autobiographical novel) with attention to social and historical contexts and to thematic connections between texts. It is not purely a survey of "Great American Novels," but may include both canonical and non-canonical writers. Critical and theoretical texts may accompany literary readings. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 394 Studies in American Literature and Culture Since 1900
This course will be organized around different literary periods, geographical regions, fields of study, and intellectual and cultural movements. Possible topics include the Harlem Renaissance, literature and the left, literature of new social movements (Black power, feminism, lesbian and gay rights), youth cultures, the Vietnam era, immigrant writers, American Indian writers, southern writers, Caribbean writers in the USA, and Maine writers. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

British Literature Since 1900

ENG 390 British Poetry Since 1900
This course will focus on poetry written in Britain since 1900, with emphases on such questions as the development of modernism, poetic forms and strategies, links to political and cultural developments, and new forms and strategies after modernism. The course will usually focus on three or four specific poets read against a broader poetic and historical context. Poets may include T. S. Eliot, Hugh MacDiarmid, D. H. Lawrence, Stevie Smith, Liz Lochhead, Maeve McGuckian, or writers associated with the "New British Poetries." Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 392 British Novel Since 1900
This course will focus primarily on novels written with reference to the British literary tradition of the twentieth century, exhibiting the stylistic and thematic concerns associated with literary impressionism, and early and late modernism, by such writers as Joseph Conrad, Ford Madox Ford, Jean Rhys, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Samuel Beckett, Christina Stead, William Trevor, Jessie Kesson, and Lewis Grassic-Gibbon. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 398 Studies in British Literature and Culture Since 1900
This course will focus on the interrelated literatures of Britain's distinctive cultures in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. It will be organized around different literary periods, cultures, theoretical and historical emphases and social movements. Possible topics include British modernism, the Scottish Renaissance, race and writing in Britain, writing and nationalism. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

Other National Literatures Since 1900

ENG 324 Studies in Canadian Literature and Culture
This course offers students an in-depth study of specific regional, cultural, or political developments in Canadian literature and film. Students may investigate the works of ethnic minorities, women, or particular authors. They may also focus on formative historical periods in the social development of Canada and the literature these periods have inspired (e.g. Quebec literature, literature of the Great Depression). May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 395 Irish Literature and Culture
Irish literature in English and Irish culture will be studied in relation to three phases in the political and cultural development of Ireland as a nation: 1) the period of Irish nationalism prior to independence in 1922; 2) the formative years of nation building and its myth-making from independence to 1960; 3) 1960 to the present. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 396 James Joyce
An examination of Joyce's major texts, includingDubliners,A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man,Ulysses, and selections fromFinnegans Wake. Emphasis will be onUlysses. The course also will include relevant biographical, critical and contextual material. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 397 Studies in Irish Literature and Culture
Topics in Irish literature and culture, often set in the context of Irish history and politics. Sample topics include: Irish drama, Irish film, Yeats and Joyce, Joyce and Beckett, and women and Irish culture. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

International Literature Since 1900

ENG 321 Modernisms
This course will focus on some aspect or aspects of American, British, Continental, and international literary modernisms. Students should expect to explore writing from the first half of the twentieth century and to investigate issues of literary innovation, modernity and historical change, self-understandings as "modern," competing literary versions of modernism, and theoretical/historical versions of modernism. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 322 Modern Autobiography
The concept of the self has undergone critical changes in the history of autobiography. Many modern autobiographical writers have completely dispensed with traditional notions of the self, expanding the genre and giving it a strong literary focus. By comparing a selection of autobiographical texts by modern authors such as Rilke, Stein, Barthes, and H. D. with more traditional forms of autobiography, the course investigates the historical vicissitudes in the conceptualization of a "self." Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 326 Studies in International Literature Since 1900
Literature since 1900 has become increasingly international especially because of expanded availability of translated texts. This course explores topics in literature that are international in scope whether through specific influences or in response to historical, philosophical, political, and aesthetic developments. Although the range and focus of the course will vary, topics will include studies in Commonwealth and European literatures as well as literatures of specific regions such as Africa, the Caribbean, South America. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Cr 3.

ENG 327 Modern Short Story: Themes and Methods
Detailed consideration of from six to ten short story collections reflecting contemporary themes and narrative methods. Although selections will vary, the recent reading list has included Jorge Luis Borges, Franz Kafka, Anton Chekhov, James Joyce, Thomas Mann, Virginia Woolf, Isaac Babel, Grace Paley, Flannery O'Connor, Katherine Anne Porter, and Zora Neale Hurston. A necessarily wide range of themes is confronted: the corruption of reality by dream; personal inadequacy, alienation, and paranoia; self-deceit; varieties of ignorance and cowardice; the moral insight afforded the artist; violence as a mode of self-discovery. Prerequisite: junior class standing or permission of the instructor. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 328 Modern Novel: Themes and Methods
Works by six or more distinguished novelists expressing contemporary subject matter and technique. Among representative themes students will consider those of dream and illusion, revolution and personal revolt, alienation and anxiety, crime and self-assertion; among narrative techniques, ellipsis and adaptations of stream-of-consciousness. The list of novelists will vary, but recent assignments include Knut Hamsun, Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, Herman Hesse, Andre Malraux, D. H. Lawrence, James Joyce, Christina Stead, Virginia Woolf, Rebecca West, and Djuna Barnes. Prerequisite: junior class standing or permission of the instructor. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 329 Modern Drama
A survey of modern English and Continental dramatists who have had a revolutionary impact on the modern theater. Authors to be considered might include Buchner, Strindberg, Ibsen, Pirandello, Brecht, Ionesco, Beckett, Pinter, Fornes, Churchill, and Norman. The course will emphasize the experience of drama as much as possible by viewing video productions of several plays. Variable cycle. Cr 3.

ENG 490 Independent Study in Literature Since 1900
By instructor's permission. See Department for application form. Cr var.

ENG 491 Seminar in Literature Since 1900
Fulfills the general education capstone requirement. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. Prerequisite: 36 credit hours in English, including ENG 245 or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

Approved Electives

Up to six credit hours of specific approved courses offered by other departments and programs may be applied toward English major elective credit. Consult the English Department coordinator of advising for the list of approved courses.

Experimental Courses

Occasionally the English Department offers special courses not listed individually in the catalog. They appear in the current Schedule of Courses under the designation 199, 299, 399, or 499. Such courses will usually be experimental: pursuing original research, testing new alignments of figures or materials, or trying out courses before including them in the Department curriculum.