School of Music

Paul Christiansen

Associate Professor
Paul Christiansen

Office

114B Corthell Hall

Contact Information

Phone: 207-780-5382

Paul Christiansen is Associate Professor of Musicology at the University of Southern Maine. He has offered courses in the history and analysis of Western music, world music, and musicianship at all levels from non-major to graduate. In 2007, he co-taught Bohemian Rhapsody, a culture and history course in the Czech Republic. Before coming to USM, he taught in the Musicology Department of Palacký University (Olomouc, Czech Republic) and in the Music Department of the University of California, Davis. 

Dr. Christiansen’s areas of research interest are Czech music, Janáček, Haydn, orientalism, hermeneutics, rock music, and music in political advertisements. In support of his research, he has received research fellowships and grants from Fulbright, DAAD, and the Czech Science Foundation. His work has appeared in New Grove (7th ed.), Plainsong and Medieval Music, Notes, Echo, Journal of Musicological Research, Journal of the Society for American Music, MedieKultur: Journal of Media and Communication Research, and 19th-Century Music. In 2010 a book he translated into English, Alois Hába: A Catalogue of the Music and Writings, was published by Koniasch Latin Press. He is a regular grant referee for Fulbright and the Czech Science Foundation.

Dr. Christiansen has given commentary on Janáček for BBC 3 Radio and for National Czech Radio Prague, and he regularly presents research nationally and internationally. Most recently, he gave papers at the Czech and Slovak Music and Related Arts conference as well as the annual conferences of Music and the Moving Image, the Society for Eighteenth-Century Music, the Society for Musicology in Ireland, and the Annual Meeting of the American Musicological Society. Currently he is working on a book about music in political advertisements.

LANGUAGES

Czech (near-native), French (intermediate), and German (CEFR level B2);

Reading knowledge of Latin, Classical Greek (Attic)