Child Welfare

Workforce and Leadership Development

Abstract: 

This centennial book brings together a national roster of child welfare experts from academia and practice to document the significant contributions of the Children's Bureau to U.S. policy development for children and families. Highlighting foster care developments, chapters illuminate for the reader the complexities of the system as it evolved from a tradition of 'rescue and punishment,' deeply seeped in racial inequities, to current efforts of advancing progressive policies that aim to correct systemic inequities, promote empirically based approaches that recognize the significance of culture in services planning, and affirm that the well-being of children is inextricably linked to the well-being of families and communities. The book makes an important contribution to the child welfare literature by documenting how far we have come as a nation in addressing the needs of dependent children and is an invaluable reference volume and a supplementary child welfare textbook. -Alma J. Carten, PhD, ACSW, LCSW, Associate Professor, New York University Silver School of Social Work

Suggested Citation:

Cahn K, Bernotavicz F, Potter C. Workforce and Leadership Development. In: Briar-Lawson K, McCarthy M, Dickinson NS, eds. The Children's Bureau: Shaping a Century of Child Welfare Practices, Programs, and Policies. Washington, DC: NASW Press; 2013.

Publication Type: 
Book Chapter
Publish Date: 
October 1, 2013

The Coaching Role of Supervisors

Abstract: 

Article authored by Freda Bernotavicz, in  Voume 7,  no. 1, 2013 of Training and Development in Human Services, the journal of the National Staff Development and Training Association.

This article is based on an on-line module on Coaching Strategies for Supervisors that is part of a national training program funded by the Children’s Bureau/US DHHS/ACF under the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (NCWWI), Award #90CT0145.This article is solely the responsibility of the NCWWI and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Children’s Bureau.

Publication Type: 
Journal Article
Publish Date: 
January 1, 2013

Child Care and Children with Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families: Parents' Voices

Abstract: 

This report represents the first, exploratory phase of a larger study to learn about the experiences of low income families of children with special needs in finding and keeping child care and balancing work and family. Our interest in this area focused on a number of policy arenas including the child care system, workplace policies, welfare reform and the system of early intervention and special education for children zero to five. We recognized that all of these programs and policies affected employment decisions and strategies and the ability of parents to balance work with the needs of their families. Given the complexity of our study, we chose to begin by conducting qualitative research with families in order to explore what issues were involved and what methodologies in the larger study would best address those issues. Therefore, during the first year of our three-year study, we conducted focus groups and in-depth,
semi-structured interviews with parents and guardians of children with special needs. These were held between May 20th and November 13th, 2002.We hope that these and the other findings that emerge from our research will help bring the voices of these parents into the debates about child care, welfare reform and special education that are taking place at the state and federal level. Our aim in conducting the research in the manner we did, was to emphasize for policy makers the importance of looking across policies and programs to understand how the system as a whole affects this population of children and families. By focusing on the families’ experiences first, and then looking at all the sectors of the system which serve them, we hope by the end of this project to provide a sense of where inconsistencies in policies, gaps in services and fragmentation of programs may be making the work/family balance for these families more difficult.

Suggested Citation: Ward H, Atkins J, Herrick A, et al.  Child Care and Children With Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families: Parents' Voices.   Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service; April 2004.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
April 1, 2004
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/CYF/Children-With-Special-Needs-Parents-Voices.pdf

Child Care and Children With Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families.

Abstract: 

Findings from this mixed methods study include:

  • Parents of young children with special needs face significant challenges finding and keeping child care arrangements for their child.
  • Parents report significant problems with the child care arrangements they have used for their child with special needs.
  • There are significant programmatic and financial barriers to supporting parents of children with special needs so they can work, and balance work and family.
  • The combination of all of these problems and the particular demands of caring for a child with special needs often result in employment problems and job instability.
  • Families of children with special needs face more economic difficulties (poverty, food and rent insecurity, lack of health insurance) than do families of children without special needs.
  • Certain types of disabilities have a greater impact on the number of child care and work problems than others.
  • Having a child with multiple special needs or having more than one child with special needs significantly increases the likelihood of employment difficulties and job instability.

Suggested Citation: Ward H, Morris L, Oldham E, et al.  Child Care and Children With Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families.  Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Cutler Institute for Child and Family Policy; December 2006.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
December 1, 2006
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/CYF/Children-With-Special-Needs-Challenges-for-Low-Income-Families.pdf

Guide for Developing and Implementing Child Welfare Practice Models

Abstract: 

The Guide for Developing and Implementing Child Welfare Practice Models, published by the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement, offers an overall framework for developing, implementing, and/or strengthening a child welfare practice model; cites specific examples from the field; and provides additional information to help child welfare agencies and their partners make informed choices in selecting their approaches to this important work. It provides guidance on developing a practice model, and details steps to take through each stage of implementation, including a discussion of fourteen specific implementation drivers. The Guide includes worksheets to help agencies articulate practice model principles, identify frontline practice skills, and assess readiness, and lists resources for ongoing support.

For more information, or to request hard copies, contact Anne Comstock.

Suggested citation: McCarthy J. Guide for Developing and Implementing Child Welfare Practice Models. Portland, ME: National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement; October 2012.

Publication Type: 
Book/Monograph
Publish Date: 
October 30, 2012
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/practicemodel/PMguide.pdf

National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement

Duration: 
1/30/2011 - 10/31/2013
Director: 
Peter Watson, M.P.P.
Principal Investigator: 
Kris Sahonchik
Research Staff: 
Sara Needleman
Abstract: 

<p>The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement's (NRCOI) mission is to support organizations committed to the welfare of children, youth and families and help them achieve better systemic outcomes.</p>

<p>We are funded by the Children's Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to provide free, on-site training and technical assistance (T/TA) to State and Tribal child welfare agencies.</p>

<p>Through training, technical assistance, research and evaluation we help agencies improve management and operations, expand organizational capacity and promote service integration. We focus T/TA in six primary areas, including: Strategic Planning, Quality Improvement, Collaboration, Workforce, Training Systems, and the federal Child and Family Services Review process.</p>

Project URL: 
http://www.nrcoi.org
Start Date: 
Sun, 2011-01-30
End Date: 
Thu, 2013-10-31
Legacy Muskie ID: 
8 149

National Child Welfare Workforce Institute

Duration: 
1/1/2008 - 1/29/2013
Director: 
Freda Bernotavicz
Collaborators: 
SUNY Albany, University of Denver, UNC-Chapel Hill
Abstract: 

The National Workforce Institute, a five-year collaborative project, supports the development of skilled child welfare leaders across the country. The project builds on work of the Child Welfare Recruitment and Retention project completed earlier. The aim of the project is to improve the systems that recruit, train, supervise, manage and retain professionals in child welfare. Muskie staff designed the training system and delivers training via distance learning to supervisors.</p>

<p>The project includes 21 hours of on-line learning in the core curriculum in addition to live coaching sessions. The project won the 2011 Quality Award awarded by the National Staff Development and Training Association. </p>

Project URL: 
http://ncwwi.org/
Start Date: 
Tue, 2008-01-01
End Date: 
Tue, 2013-01-29
Legacy Muskie ID: 
5 208

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