Children's Behavioral Health

Exploring the Business Case for Children's Telebehavioral Health

Abstract: 

This brief, authored by John Gale, M.S. and David Lambert, Ph.D. from the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center, explores terminology, reimbursement and business issues, and provides examples from the field in the development of telebehavioral health services. In the first section, the authors place children’s telebehavioral health within the context and demands of today’s rural healthcare system, where the majority of children’s telebehavioral health services are delivered. They then describe three examples of the use of telebehavioral health to serve children, adolescents, and families in rural communities. The brief concludes by exploring the business case for telebehavioral health including the issues and challenges of service delivery, coordination, and financing. This brief is informed by a national study of telemental health (serving children, adults, and older persons) in rural health systems conducted by the authors and updated to reflect the latest information on three case examples.

For more information, please contact John Gale at john.gale@maine.edu

Suggested citation: Gale J, Lambert D. Exploring the Business Case for Children's Telebehavioral Health. Washington, DC: The Technical Assistance Network for Children's Behavioral Health, The Institute for Innovation & Implementation; March, 2015. Brief.

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
March 2, 2015

Rural Children Experience Different Rates of Mental Health Diagnosis and Treatment

Abstract: 

Research indicates that privately insured, rural adults have lower use of office-based mental health services, but higher use of prescription medicines than their urban counterparts.  Patterns for rural children may be different from urban children because of the limited supply of pediatric mental health providers in rural areas, which may lead to reduced access and lower use of mental health services in rural areas versus urban.  Using data on children ages 5-17 from the 2002-2008 of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, researchers from the Maine Rural Health Research Center find that rural children are significantly less likely to be diagnosed and treated for non-ADHD mental health problems than urban children and are less likely to receive mental health counseling.  The rural-urban difference is greatest among those children scoring in the “possible impairment” range on the Columbia Impairment Scale.

Suggested citation for Research & Policy Brief: 

Anderson, N., Neuwirth, S., Lenardson, J.D., & Hartley, D. (2013, June). Rural children experience different rates of mental health diagnosis and treatment. (Research & Policy Brief). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center. http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/Rural-Children-Mental-Hea...

Suggested citation for Working Paper:

Anderson, N., Neuwirth, S., Lenardson, J.D., & Hartley, D. (2013, June). Patterns of care for rural and urban children with mental health problems. (Working Paper #49). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center. http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/WP49-Rural-Children-Menta...

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
June 17, 2013
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/Rural-Children-Mental-Health_PolicyBrief.pdf

Patterns of Care for Rural and Urban Children with Mental Health Problems

Abstract: 

Research indicates that privately insured, rural adults have lower use of office-based mental health services, but higher use of prescription medicines than their urban counterparts.  Patterns for rural children may be different from urban children because of the limited supply of pediatric mental health providers in rural areas, which may lead to reduced access and lower use of mental health services in rural areas versus urban.  Using data on children ages 5-17 from the 2002-2008 of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, researchers from the Maine Rural Health Research Center find that rural children are significantly less likely to be diagnosed and treated for non-ADHD mental health problems than urban children and are less likely to receive mental health counseling.  The rural-urban difference is greatest among those children scoring in the “possible impairment” range on the Columbia Impairment Scale.

Suggested citation for Working Paper:

Anderson, N., Neuwirth, S., Lenardson, J.D., & Hartley, D. (2013, June). Patterns of care for rural and urban children with mental health problems. (Working Paper #49). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center. http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/WP49-Rural-Children-Menta...

Suggested citation for associated Research & Policy Brief: 

Anderson, N., Neuwirth, S., Lenardson, J.D., & Hartley, D. (2013, June). Rural children experience different rates of mental health diagnosis and treatment. (Research & Policy Brief). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center. http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/Rural-Children-Mental-Hea...

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
June 17, 2013
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MRHRC/WP49-Rural-Children-Mental-Health.pdf
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