Family Support

Child Care and Children With Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families.

Abstract: 

Findings from this mixed methods study include:

  • Parents of young children with special needs face significant challenges finding and keeping child care arrangements for their child.
  • Parents report significant problems with the child care arrangements they have used for their child with special needs.
  • There are significant programmatic and financial barriers to supporting parents of children with special needs so they can work, and balance work and family.
  • The combination of all of these problems and the particular demands of caring for a child with special needs often result in employment problems and job instability.
  • Families of children with special needs face more economic difficulties (poverty, food and rent insecurity, lack of health insurance) than do families of children without special needs.
  • Certain types of disabilities have a greater impact on the number of child care and work problems than others.
  • Having a child with multiple special needs or having more than one child with special needs significantly increases the likelihood of employment difficulties and job instability.

Suggested Citation: Ward H, Morris L, Oldham E, et al.  Child Care and Children With Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families.  Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Cutler Institute for Child and Family Policy; December 2006.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
December 1, 2006
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/CYF/Children-With-Special-Needs-Challenges-for-Low-Income-Families.pdf

2012 Maine Child Support Guidelines: Review and Recommendations

Abstract: 

Ward, S., Daley, J., Fraumeni, B., Shaler, G., Griffin, E., Knox, M., Hallett, L., & Mandeville, L. (2012, July). 2012 Maine child support guidelines: Review and recommendations. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy. <br></br>
Prepared for the Maine Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Family Independence, Division of Child Support Enforcement. This report summarizes the quadrennial review of Maine's child support guidelines conducted by the USM Muskie School , which complies with federal law requiring each state's child support guidelines be reviewed at least once every four years. Principle findings of the extensive review by the Muskie School show that many aspects of Maine's child support system work well. Maine's low deviation rate reflects a reasonably high level of consistency in apply the guidelines, and in large part, protect the needs and interests of the children. The report provides background and overview of child support modes and the Maine guidelines, and describes the elements of the review: Literature Review, Policy Analysis, Economic Analysis, Deviation Study, Stakeholder Input, Interviews with other State Child Support Officials, and concludes with several findings and recommendations. For additional information about the report or the study, contact Janice Daley at the Muskie School (jdaley@usm.maine.edu).

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
July 31, 2012

DHHSTI OIAS Education & Training 09/10

Duration: 
1/1/2009 - 1/30/2010
Abstract: 

In this agreement, Muskie will work with OIAS and the Department of Labor to find ways to optimize use of Food Supplement Employment and Training money to train and/or educate selected Food Supplement recipients for "in demand" occupations in Maine that pay a sustainable wage. Muskie staff will participate in a workgroup with members from both DOL and OIAS and will assist in writing a plan to submit to the USDA for approval.

Start Date: 
Thu, 2009-01-01
End Date: 
Sat, 2010-01-30
Legacy Muskie ID: 
6 885

Stress Among Working Poor Family Caregivers of Children with Disabilities and Other Special Needs

Duration: 
1/1/2004 - 1/1/2005
Abstract: 

This project pools data from all three waves (1997, 1999, and 2002) of the National Survey of American Families (NSAF) to quantitatively investigate the impact of competing demands of work and caregiving on the stress and mental health status of working poor mothers of special needs or disabled children. The proposed empirical strategy will attempt to address a number of shortcomings of the existing research, including use of small, unrepresentative samples, limited specification of child disability type and severity, and econometric difficulties that arise when estimating the impact of employment and the presence of a disabled child on maternal stress, including covariate correlation and endogeneity due to reverse causality.

Start Date: 
Thu, 2004-01-01
End Date: 
Sat, 2005-01-01
Legacy Muskie ID: 
2 827

DHHSTI OIAS ASPIRE 09/10

Duration: 
1/1/2009 - 1/30/2010
Abstract: 

The focus of ASPIRE training in this Cooperative Agreement will be to provide supervisory and managerial staff with additional tools and information to support their efforts to meet provisions of the DRA. Muskie will continue work with TANF/ASPIRE staff to refine the TANF Orientation process and continue to build on the successful TANF-O training delivered in FY 2009 to make it a more interactive and engaging experience for participants. Muskie will work with OIAS to identify ways to assess the impact the revised orientation process is having on ASPIRE participants.

Project URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/publicwelfare/pages/aspire.htm
Start Date: 
Thu, 2009-01-01
End Date: 
Sat, 2010-01-30
Legacy Muskie ID: 
6 881
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