Justice Systems (Criminal, Civil, Juvenile)

Disproportionate Contact: Youth of Color in Maine's Juvenile Justice System

Abstract: 

Research staff at the USM Muskie School work in partnership with Maine’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Group (JJAG) in support of the goal of producing information to enhance Maine’s understanding of disproportionate minority contact (DMC) in the state. This  research documents the rate of disproportionate minority contact (DMC) for youth involved in Maine’s juvenile justice system, differences in pathways to detention for youth of color, and the  experiences of youth and families of color who have had contact with Maine’s juvenile justice system.  It uses a relative rate index (RRI) to demonstrate how youth of color are treated in comparison to their white counterparts throughout nine separate contact points in the juvenile justice system.  This Maine-focused research report aligns with several federal, state, and local efforts aimed at promoting equity for youth of color throughout the juvenile justice system. In part, this report fulfills a federal grant requirement from the Office of Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) to identify DMC within the juvenile justice system in Maine. In order to assist states in their efforts to comply with the DMC requirements of the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDPA), the OJJDP funds state-based advisory groups to understand and reduce DMC in their jurisdictions.  Maine’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Group (JJAG) has partnered with the Muskie School of Public Service at the University of Southern Maine to conduct this research to inform these efforts.

For more information, contact the authors.

Suggested Citation: Dumont, R., King, E., & Shaler, G. (2015). Disproportionate contact: Youth of color in maine's juvenile justice system. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service.

 

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
May 18, 2015
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/justiceresearch/Publications/Juvenile/DMC.FINAL.05.15.2015.pdf

Gender-Responsive Policy Development in Corrections: What We Know and Roadmaps for Change

Abstract: 

Erica King, research staff at the Muskie School, co-authored this policy bulletin for the US Department of Justice National Institute of Corrections with Jillian Foley, a recent Muskie School graduate.

Lack of gender-informed policy creates challenges for correctional practitioners. When there is a gap between training that is evidence-based and gender-informed and what is written in policy, staff may find themselves hindered in their attempts to work toward establishing a gender-responsive environment. This policy bulletin, released in February 2015 and based on survey data and focus groups with women, is an initial step to determine the existence of gender-informed policy within correctional agencies. The findings of this bulletin provide an overview of the current state of gender-responsive policies for women and define a focus for future research, training and technical assistance in the effort to create a more effective, and efficient correctional approach for women offenders.

Suggested Citation: King E, Foley J. Gender-Responsive Policy Development in Corrections: What We Know and Roadmaps for Change. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections; October, 2014.

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
October 1, 2014
Author: 
URL: 
https://s3.amazonaws.com/static.nicic.gov/Library/029747.pdf

Barriers and Successes in U Visas for Immigrant Victims

Abstract: 

This article, co-authored by Karen Monahan, was the result of a collaborative effort among immigration legal services providers, experts, researchers, and staff of the VAWA Measuring Effectiveness Initiative project at the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service.  The original paper was developed and used to provide guidance to Legal Assistance for Victims grantees on how best to advocate for U visa-eligible victims; this peer-reviewed article provides more legal context and detail on the experiences of the grantees and the victims they represented.

This article examines barriers encountered and successes experienced in the provision of legal representation and advocacy to victims of violence applying for legal immigration status under the Violence against Women Act’s U visa protections. The U visa is designed for immigrant victims who have suffered substantial physical or mental abuse as a result of being a victim of criminal activity, and who have helped, are helping or are likely to be helpful to government officials in the detection, investigation or prosecution of criminal activity. This article is based on quantitative and qualitative data reported by grantees of the Legal Assistance for Victims grant program administered by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. Legal Assistance for Victims program grantees provide legal aid to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and/or stalking and report semi-annually on services provided. The sample consists of grantees who reported serving high proportions of immigrant and limited English proficient victims of violence in 2007 and 2008.

The article focuses on problems, successes, and creative solutions reported by attorneys and advocates working with immigrant victims eligible to receive crime victim U visas under federal immigration laws. Victims applying for U visa immigration relief must, under current law, submit a U visa certification signed by the head of a law enforcement agency, prosecutor, judge, or other government official with their U visa application.

This research provides information regarding effective strategies and best practices used by grantees that are successful in obtaining U visa certification. The systemic barriers that immigrant victims and their advocates encounter when working with U visa are also discussed, along with creative solutions grantees are using to overcome these barriers.

Suggested Citation: Hass G, Yang E, Monahan K, Orloff L, Anver B. (2014). Barriers and
Successes in U Visas for Immigrant Victims:The Experiences of Legal Assistance
for Victims Grantees. Arts and Social Sciences Journal, S1: 005. doi: 10.4172/2151-6200.S1-005

Publication Type: 
Journal Article
Publish Date: 
November 13, 2014
Author: 

Practical Implications of Current Intimate Partner Violence Research for Victim Advocates and Service Providers

Abstract: 

This guide uses a question-and-answer format to inform victim advocates and service providers of the findings of published research on intimate partner violence (IPV) and their relevance for practice. The first of 13 sections of the guide poses and answers 11 questions pertinent to the issue, “What is intimate partner violence?” The issues addressed include the various behaviors and circumstances that constitute IPV, whether men and women are equally likely to be victims or perpetrators of IPV, and whether women’s use of IPV is different from men’s.The second major section poses and answers 12 questions related to IPV victimization rates, addressing issues of populations at increased risk for IPV, with special attention to women who are separated or divorced, pregnant, disabled, elderly, LGBT, live in rural areas. The guide’s third section poses and answers 19 questions related to the impact of IPV on victims. The fourth section poses and answers 20 questions related to the characteristics of persons who perpetrate IPV.  Other sections of the guide pose and answer questions related to victim characteristics that predict IPV victimization; whether IPV victims seek assistance and services; protective factors and coping skills that mitigate the adverse impact of IPV; the services that are typically available to IPV victims; whether victim services work; health-care providers’ role in responding to IPV; what victim advocates and service providers need to know about the legal system; the features of IPV victim advocacy; and the performance measures advocates should adopt in evaluating the criminal justice response to IPV.  The implications drawn from the research are offered as guidance, not rules of practice. 884 references are provided.

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

For more information, please contact Barbara Hart, JD, barbarha@aol.com

Suggested Citation:  Hart BJ, Klein AF. Practical Implications of Current Intimate Partner Violence Research for Victim Advocates and Service Providers. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Criminal Justice Reference Service; January, 2013. NCJ 244348.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
December 31, 2013
Author: 
URL: 
https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/244348.pdf

LGBTI Populations: Their Safety, Your Responsibility

Abstract: 

Erica King, Policy Associate in the Muskie School of Public Service, was the featured policy advisor for this 3-hour broadcast on November 7, 2012, which is meant to inform and increase awareness of strategies for developing policies and procedures for LGBTI populations. The broadcast highlighted promising practices by providing resources and examples of agencies who are responding to the needs of the LGBTI population in their setting. During this national discussion sponsored and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections, presenters defined a framework for developing strategies for ensuring the safety, dignity, and respect of LGBTI individuals in corrections settings; identified typical concerns and challenges that arise as agencies address the needs and requirements of LGBTI offenders in corrections settings; identified operational practices that can increase effectiveness of working with LGBTI offenders; and reviewed and discussed effective policy and program development strategies that address LGBTI populations in corrections.

Suggested Citation: LGBTI Populations: Their Safety, Your Responsibility [Satellite/Internet Broadcast] [2 DVDs]. Washington, DC: National Institute of Corrections; November 7,2012.

Publication Type: 
Video
Publish Date: 
November 7, 2012
Author: 
URL: 
http://nicic.gov/library/026763

Advancing the Use of CBT with Justice-Involved Women

Abstract: 

Forensic CBT: A Handbook for Clinical Practice is an edited collection that represents the first authoritative resource on the utilization of Cognigive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) strategies and techniques for offender clients.

Erica King, Policy Associate at the USM Muskie School of Public Services is co-author with Dr. Marilyn Van Dieten on chapter 16 in Part III of the book, Tailoring CBT to Special Forensic Populations, which looks at cognitive behavioral therapy for justice-involved women.  The authors highlight the differential needs of justice-involved women and discuss how to conduct gener-responsive treatment.

The book features contributions from leaders of the major schools of CBT on the treatment of antisocial personality patterns as well as anger, interpersonal violence, substance abuse, and sexual aggression; Addresses modified CBT approaches for female, juvenile, and culturally diverse forensic populations; Covers emerging areas of forensic practices, including the integration of motivational interviewing and strength-based approaches; and Includes an assortment of worksheets, handouts, and exercises for practitioners to use with their clients.

Suggested Citation:

Van Dieten, M., & King, E. (2013). Advancing the use of CBT with justice-involved women. In R. C. Tafrate & D. Mitchell (Eds.), Forensic CBT: A handbook for clinical practice (pp. 329-353). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Publication Type: 
Book Chapter
Publish Date: 
November 1, 2013
Author: 
URL: 
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1119953286.html

Probation Violation Research & Technical Assistance

Duration: 
1/1/2009 - 1/31/2010
Abstract: 

The Justice Research Statistics Association (JRSA) has selected the Maine Statistical Analysis Center (SAC) to conduct a study of probation revocations in Maine, and to provide data to JRSA for a multi-state study of parole/probation revocations. Maine proposes to examine all state probationers with a split (prison/jail and then probation) sentence in 2006 and analyze the probation violations and revocations over a 24 month period. The SAC will collaborate with JRSA to ensure that Maine data is standardized and conforms to an appropriate format for submission to JRSA.

Start Date: 
Thu, 2009-01-01
End Date: 
Sun, 2010-01-31
Legacy Muskie ID: 
6 428

Pages

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