Process Methods: Training and Technical Assistance

The Coaching Role of Supervisors

Abstract: 

Article authored by Freda Bernotavicz, in  Voume 7,  no. 1, 2013 of Training and Development in Human Services, the journal of the National Staff Development and Training Association.

This article is based on an on-line module on Coaching Strategies for Supervisors that is part of a national training program funded by the Children’s Bureau/US DHHS/ACF under the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute (NCWWI), Award #90CT0145.This article is solely the responsibility of the NCWWI and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Children’s Bureau.

Publication Type: 
Journal Article
Publish Date: 
January 1, 2013

Practical Implications of Current Intimate Partner Violence Research for Victim Advocates and Service Providers

Abstract: 

This guide uses a question-and-answer format to inform victim advocates and service providers of the findings of published research on intimate partner violence (IPV) and their relevance for practice. The first of 13 sections of the guide poses and answers 11 questions pertinent to the issue, “What is intimate partner violence?” The issues addressed include the various behaviors and circumstances that constitute IPV, whether men and women are equally likely to be victims or perpetrators of IPV, and whether women’s use of IPV is different from men’s.The second major section poses and answers 12 questions related to IPV victimization rates, addressing issues of populations at increased risk for IPV, with special attention to women who are separated or divorced, pregnant, disabled, elderly, LGBT, live in rural areas. The guide’s third section poses and answers 19 questions related to the impact of IPV on victims. The fourth section poses and answers 20 questions related to the characteristics of persons who perpetrate IPV.  Other sections of the guide pose and answer questions related to victim characteristics that predict IPV victimization; whether IPV victims seek assistance and services; protective factors and coping skills that mitigate the adverse impact of IPV; the services that are typically available to IPV victims; whether victim services work; health-care providers’ role in responding to IPV; what victim advocates and service providers need to know about the legal system; the features of IPV victim advocacy; and the performance measures advocates should adopt in evaluating the criminal justice response to IPV.  The implications drawn from the research are offered as guidance, not rules of practice. 884 references are provided.

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

For more information, please contact Barbara Hart, JD, barbarha@aol.com

Suggested Citation:  Hart BJ, Klein AF. Practical Implications of Current Intimate Partner Violence Research for Victim Advocates and Service Providers. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Criminal Justice Reference Service; January, 2013. NCJ 244348.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
December 31, 2013
Author: 
URL: 
https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/244348.pdf

Guide for Developing and Implementing Child Welfare Practice Models

Abstract: 

The Guide for Developing and Implementing Child Welfare Practice Models, published by the National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement, offers an overall framework for developing, implementing, and/or strengthening a child welfare practice model; cites specific examples from the field; and provides additional information to help child welfare agencies and their partners make informed choices in selecting their approaches to this important work. It provides guidance on developing a practice model, and details steps to take through each stage of implementation, including a discussion of fourteen specific implementation drivers. The Guide includes worksheets to help agencies articulate practice model principles, identify frontline practice skills, and assess readiness, and lists resources for ongoing support.

For more information, or to request hard copies, contact Anne Comstock.

Suggested citation: McCarthy J. Guide for Developing and Implementing Child Welfare Practice Models. Portland, ME: National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement; October 2012.

Publication Type: 
Book/Monograph
Publish Date: 
October 30, 2012
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/helpkids/practicemodel/PMguide.pdf

Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Project

Duration: 
1/1/2005 - 1/30/2007
Director: 
Judith Tupper
Principal Investigator: 
Andrew Coburn
Abstract: 

Patient safety standards and systems have been developed and conducted in large, urban hospitals and the relevance of such standards and systems for smaller, rural hospitals has not been established. The purpose of this project is to test the feasibility, cost, and impact of implementing patient safety standards in small, rural hospitals. Working with 8 hospitals in Tennessee, this project will create a sustainable infrastructure for assisting rural hospitals to implement critical safety improvements and to more toward a universal culture of safety. The resulting materials and tools will allow for broader replication in Tennessee and other states.

Project URL: 
http://www.mainecahpatientsafety.net/
Start Date: 
Sat, 2005-01-01
End Date: 
Tue, 2007-01-30
Legacy Muskie ID: 
2807

State Solutions for Maximizing MSP Enrollment

Duration: 
1/1/2005 - 1/31/2007
Director: 
Kimberley Fox
Abstract: 

State Solutions is a national program office for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation focused on maximizing enrollment in Medicare Savings Programs (e.g. QMB, SLMB, and QI1). This project provides technical assistance and policy analyses to State Solutions to identify and evaluate incentives created for increasing enrollment in the Medicare Savings Programs as a result of the implementation of the Medicare Part D drug benefit and low-income subsidies. The project will produce a series of issue briefs and develop and implement the agenda for a national invitational summit on this topic.

Start Date: 
Sat, 2005-01-01
End Date: 
Wed, 2007-01-31
Legacy Muskie ID: 
3247

Part D State Survey

Duration: 
1/1/2006 - 1/30/2006
Director: 
Kimberley Fox
Abstract: 

This project provided policy guidance and technical assistance to the Rutgers Center for State Health Policy (CSHP) for its contract with the state of New Jersey to assist the state in developing a plan for wrapping its current state pharmacy assistance program, the Pharmaceutical Assistance for the Aged and Disabled program (PAAD) around the new Medicare Part D benefit. This is a continuation of work that Kimberley Fox was conducting at Rutgers Center for State Health Policy (CSHP) prior to joining the Muskie School. Technical assistance included analysis of regulations, tracking other state activities, guiding simulations conducted by CSHP of various policy options using existing PAAD claims data, and developing an evaluation plan for the state in measuring the impact of Part D on the state program and its enrollees.

Start Date: 
Sun, 2006-01-01
End Date: 
Mon, 2006-01-30
Legacy Muskie ID: 
3757

Maine Food Stamp Nutrition Education Plan 2008

Duration: 
1/1/2007 - 1/30/2008
Abstract: 

The Maine Nutrition Network (MNN) Food Stamp Nutrition Education (FSNE)Plan FY 08 consists of multiple projects that impact three main goals. These goals include sustaining a collaborative of state and local partners to accomplish innovative nutrition education program; support environments in which Maine children choose active lifestyles and make informed food choices that support optimal health; and provide opportunities for Maine adults to make appropriate food choices and have increased accessibility to food and physical activity choices that support optimal health. The Office of Integrated Access and Support and the Maine DCD collaborate with Muskie to effectively reach these goals through training and technical assistance to schools and communities that reach Maine people who are eligible to participate in the Food Stamp Program.

Start Date: 
Mon, 2007-01-01
End Date: 
Wed, 2008-01-30
Legacy Muskie ID: 
4791

National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement

Duration: 
1/30/2011 - 10/31/2013
Principal Investigator: 
Kris Sahonchik
Research Staff: 
Sara Needleman MS
Abstract: 

<p>The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Organizational Improvement's (NRCOI) mission is to support organizations committed to the welfare of children, youth and families and help them achieve better systemic outcomes.</p>

<p>We are funded by the Children's Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to provide free, on-site training and technical assistance (T/TA) to State and Tribal child welfare agencies.</p>

<p>Through training, technical assistance, research and evaluation we help agencies improve management and operations, expand organizational capacity and promote service integration. We focus T/TA in six primary areas, including: Strategic Planning, Quality Improvement, Collaboration, Workforce, Training Systems, and the federal Child and Family Services Review process.</p>

Project URL: 
http://www.nrcoi.org
Start Date: 
Sun, 2011-01-30
End Date: 
Thu, 2013-10-31
Legacy Muskie ID: 
8149

Integrated Core Injury Prevention & Control Program, Year 1

Duration: 
1/1/2005 - 1/31/2006
Director: 
Barbara Poirier
Collaborators: 
Maine DHHS
Abstract: 

In 2005, the Department of Health and Human Services, (DHHS) and Muskie School jointly developed a proposal for the DHHS to enter into a five-year agreement wit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The purpose of the grant is to develop a coordinated, strategic approach to reduce the incidence, and morbidity of injury through surveillance and prevention efforts. More specifically, this agreement will enable the Maine Injury Prevention Program (MIPP) to: Build a solid infrastructure for injury prevention; collect and analyze injury data; design, implement, and evaluate interventions through collaboration with partners; provide technical support and training; and reduce the burden of injury in Maine through public policy. The purpose of the one-year agreement is to fund program management to carry out the following activities: strategic, data-driven program planning and development, facilitated stakeholder involvement, technical report development using new surveillance data, grants management, technical assistance to organizations implementing injury prevention and control programs, stakeholders and staff on conducting evaluation; selecting best-practice interventions, program development (using logic models), using new injury surveillance data, reviewing progress towards project goals and objectives, and preparing and submitting reports to CDC.

Start Date: 
Sat, 2005-01-01
End Date: 
Tue, 2006-01-31
Legacy Muskie ID: 
3053

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