Special Populations

Adults with Intellectual Disability or Autism Spectrum Disorder. Executive Summary

Abstract: 

Adults with intellectual disability or autism spectrum disorder (ID/ASD) have a variety needs for long term services supports to enable them to live as independently as possible. In Maine, the Office of Aging and Disability Services/Developmental Services provides a wide array of services to adults with ID/ASD, the majority of which are funded through MaineCare. This Chartbook describes Maine’s historical trends in meeting the needs of adults with ID/ASD through institutional and community based services in comparison to other states; a detailed analysis of the population’s utilization of different types of services and their costs in SFY 2010; an analysis of the utilization and cost of services for adults with ID/ASD who were on the waitlists for home and community based waivers services in SFY 2013; the implementation of the Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) as a means of identifying the supports needs of the adults with ID/ASD; and the complement of providers serving this population in Maine.

This Chartbook is unique in its detailing of the service and costs of adults with intellectual disability or austim spectrum disorder (ID/ASD) in Maine. The Chartbook focuses on adults with ID/ASD who are eligible only for MaineCare (Maine's Medicaid system) or who are dually eligible for MaineCare and Medicare.

The Executive Summary provides key findings in the areas of:

  • Historical Trends
  • Claims Analysis of Dually Eligible and MainCare-only Eligible Adults with ID/ASD in 2010
  • MaineCare Claims Analysis of Members on the HCBS Waitlists, SFY 2013
  • Quality Measures, SFY 2010
  • Supports Intensity Scale, 2013
  • ID/ASD Providers in Maine Compared to the Nation, 2005-2010

Click here for the Executive Summary.

Click here for the Executive Summary with Charts. 

Click here for the full Chartbook.

Suggested Citations: Snow KI, Bratesman S, Bowe T, Fralich J. Adults with Intellectual Disability or Autism Spectrum Disorder: Population and Service Use Trends in Maine, 2014 Edition. (Executive Summary). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service;2014.

Snow KI, Bratesman S, Bowe T, Fralich J. Adults with Intellectual Disability or Autism Spectrum Disorder: Population and Service Use Trends in Maine, 2014 Edition. (Chartbook). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service;2014.

Prepared for the Office of Aging and Disability Services, Maine Department of Health and Human Services by the Muskie School of Public Service, University of Southern Maine.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
December 1, 2014
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/DA/Exec-Sum-Charts-Adults-with-Intellectual-Disability-or-Autism-Maine-2014.pdf

Practical Implications of Current Intimate Partner Violence Research for Victim Advocates and Service Providers

Abstract: 

This guide uses a question-and-answer format to inform victim advocates and service providers of the findings of published research on intimate partner violence (IPV) and their relevance for practice. The first of 13 sections of the guide poses and answers 11 questions pertinent to the issue, “What is intimate partner violence?” The issues addressed include the various behaviors and circumstances that constitute IPV, whether men and women are equally likely to be victims or perpetrators of IPV, and whether women’s use of IPV is different from men’s.The second major section poses and answers 12 questions related to IPV victimization rates, addressing issues of populations at increased risk for IPV, with special attention to women who are separated or divorced, pregnant, disabled, elderly, LGBT, live in rural areas. The guide’s third section poses and answers 19 questions related to the impact of IPV on victims. The fourth section poses and answers 20 questions related to the characteristics of persons who perpetrate IPV.  Other sections of the guide pose and answer questions related to victim characteristics that predict IPV victimization; whether IPV victims seek assistance and services; protective factors and coping skills that mitigate the adverse impact of IPV; the services that are typically available to IPV victims; whether victim services work; health-care providers’ role in responding to IPV; what victim advocates and service providers need to know about the legal system; the features of IPV victim advocacy; and the performance measures advocates should adopt in evaluating the criminal justice response to IPV.  The implications drawn from the research are offered as guidance, not rules of practice. 884 references are provided.

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

For more information, please contact Barbara Hart, JD, barbarha@aol.com

Suggested Citation:  Hart BJ, Klein AF. Practical Implications of Current Intimate Partner Violence Research for Victim Advocates and Service Providers. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Criminal Justice Reference Service; January, 2013. NCJ 244348.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
December 31, 2013
Author: 
URL: 
https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/244348.pdf

LGBTI Populations: Their Safety, Your Responsibility

Abstract: 

Erica King, Policy Associate in the Muskie School of Public Service, was the featured policy advisor for this 3-hour broadcast on November 7, 2012, which is meant to inform and increase awareness of strategies for developing policies and procedures for LGBTI populations. The broadcast highlighted promising practices by providing resources and examples of agencies who are responding to the needs of the LGBTI population in their setting. During this national discussion sponsored and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections, presenters defined a framework for developing strategies for ensuring the safety, dignity, and respect of LGBTI individuals in corrections settings; identified typical concerns and challenges that arise as agencies address the needs and requirements of LGBTI offenders in corrections settings; identified operational practices that can increase effectiveness of working with LGBTI offenders; and reviewed and discussed effective policy and program development strategies that address LGBTI populations in corrections.

Suggested Citation: LGBTI Populations: Their Safety, Your Responsibility [Satellite/Internet Broadcast] [2 DVDs]. Washington, DC: National Institute of Corrections; November 7,2012.

Publication Type: 
Video
Publish Date: 
November 7, 2012
Author: 
URL: 
http://nicic.gov/library/026763

Connecting to the Community: A Case Study in Women's Resettlement Needs and Experiences

Abstract: 

Suggested Citation:

Boober BH, King EH. Connecting to the Community: A Case Study in Women's Resettlement Needs and Experiences. In: Sheehan R, McIvor G, Trotter C, eds. Working with Women Offenders in the Community. Abingdon U.K.; New York: Willan; 2011:319-341

Publication Type: 
Book Chapter
Publish Date: 
January 1, 2011
Author: 

Managing a High-Performance Medicaid Program

Abstract: 

This report discusses key responsibilities that the federal government and states hold for managing the Medicaid program and identifies the key issues and challenges states face as they transform the way they do business and achieve key national goals.  The paper relies on an extensive review of federal and state administrative responsibilities drawn from statute, regulation, and relevant literature, coupled with discussions with six current Medicaid directors.

Key Findings:

  • Federal and state governments share responsibility for administering Medicaid;
  • Medicaid's responsibilities go significantly beyond those of other insurers and programs;
  • Medicaid is evolving and faces a set of new opportunities and challenges;
  • Adequate administrative capacity is key to realizing the goal of running a high performing Medicaid program.

Suggested Citation:

Griffin E, Riley T, Wachino V, Rudowitz R. Managing a High-Performance Medicaid Program. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured; October, 2013.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
October 21, 2013
URL: 
http://kaiserfamilyfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/10/8476-managing-a-high-performance-medicaid-program.pdf

Child Care and Children with Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families: Parents' Voices

Abstract: 

This report represents the first, exploratory phase of a larger study to learn about the experiences of low income families of children with special needs in finding and keeping child care and balancing work and family. Our interest in this area focused on a number of policy arenas including the child care system, workplace policies, welfare reform and the system of early intervention and special education for children zero to five. We recognized that all of these programs and policies affected employment decisions and strategies and the ability of parents to balance work with the needs of their families. Given the complexity of our study, we chose to begin by conducting qualitative research with families in order to explore what issues were involved and what methodologies in the larger study would best address those issues. Therefore, during the first year of our three-year study, we conducted focus groups and in-depth,
semi-structured interviews with parents and guardians of children with special needs. These were held between May 20th and November 13th, 2002.We hope that these and the other findings that emerge from our research will help bring the voices of these parents into the debates about child care, welfare reform and special education that are taking place at the state and federal level. Our aim in conducting the research in the manner we did, was to emphasize for policy makers the importance of looking across policies and programs to understand how the system as a whole affects this population of children and families. By focusing on the families’ experiences first, and then looking at all the sectors of the system which serve them, we hope by the end of this project to provide a sense of where inconsistencies in policies, gaps in services and fragmentation of programs may be making the work/family balance for these families more difficult.

Suggested Citation: Ward H, Atkins J, Herrick A, et al.  Child Care and Children With Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families: Parents' Voices.   Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service; April 2004.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
April 1, 2004
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/CYF/Children-With-Special-Needs-Parents-Voices.pdf

Child Care and Children With Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families.

Abstract: 

Findings from this mixed methods study include:

  • Parents of young children with special needs face significant challenges finding and keeping child care arrangements for their child.
  • Parents report significant problems with the child care arrangements they have used for their child with special needs.
  • There are significant programmatic and financial barriers to supporting parents of children with special needs so they can work, and balance work and family.
  • The combination of all of these problems and the particular demands of caring for a child with special needs often result in employment problems and job instability.
  • Families of children with special needs face more economic difficulties (poverty, food and rent insecurity, lack of health insurance) than do families of children without special needs.
  • Certain types of disabilities have a greater impact on the number of child care and work problems than others.
  • Having a child with multiple special needs or having more than one child with special needs significantly increases the likelihood of employment difficulties and job instability.

Suggested Citation: Ward H, Morris L, Oldham E, et al.  Child Care and Children With Special Needs: Challenges for Low Income Families.  Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Cutler Institute for Child and Family Policy; December 2006.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
December 1, 2006
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/CYF/Children-With-Special-Needs-Challenges-for-Low-Income-Families.pdf

Children Served by MaineCare 2012: Survey Findings

Abstract: 

The purpose of the annual Survey of Children Served by MaineCare is to monitor the quality of services delivered by MaineCare, the State's Medicaid and CHIP program.  The 2012 survey examines the experiences of families with children. ages 0-17, who are enrolled in MaineCare using a standardized survey instrument (Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems--CAHPS--4.0H Child Medicaid Health Plan Survey). MaineCare scores very favorably compared with national benchmarks on CAHPS measures of Getting Needed Care, Getting Care Quickly, and How Well the Child's Doctors Community, with ratings at or above the 75th percentile on all the composites and individual items.  Overall ratings of the child's personal doctor, ratings of the child's specialist, and ratings of all the child's health care are also among the highest nationally.  Areas for improvement included MaineCare customer service and care coordination.  Continued administration of the CAHPS 4.0H Child Medicaid Health Plan Survey is recommended for 2013 and beyond to allow for ongoing monitoring of patient experience with and computation of trend results of the MaineCare program as well as ensuring that the MaineCare program complies with federal CHIPRA measure reporting requirements.

Suggested citation: Anderson, N., Fox, K., Thayer, D., & Croll, Z. (2013, January). Children served by MaineCare, 2012: Survey findings. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
January 1, 2013
URL: 
http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/oms/pdfs_doc/ihoc/Maine-2012-MaineCare-Children-Survey.pdf

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