Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy

Population Health and Health Policy, Maine Rural Health Research Center

Challenges and Opportunities for Improving Mental Health Services in Rural Long-Term Care


Despite high levels of need, individuals in long-term care often fail to receive appropriate mental health services, especially in rural areas. In this report (and accompanying Research & Policy Brief), we consider challenges and opportunities for improving mental health treatment delivered to long-term care recipients in rural settings. As background, we note the prevalence of mental health problems in long-term care populations, describe deficiencies in the mental health care afforded to long-term care recipients, and identify barriers that hinder the remediation of these deficiencies in rural settings. We also outline a rationale for enhancing mental health services in long-term care. We then discuss new approaches that have been implemented or could be used to effect positive transformations in the delivery of mental health services to rural long-term care populations. We underscore the potential for synergies between these innovations and provisions introduced under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010. Finally, we delineate policy considerations for promoting new mental health service models in rural long-term care settings.

Suggested citation:

Talbot, J.A., & Coburn, A.F. (2013, June). Challenges and opportunities for improving mental health services in rural long-term care. (Working Paper #50). Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center.

Publication Type: 
Publish Date: 
June 20, 2013

Nellie Mae Education Foundation nominates Pious Ali for the Lawrence W. O'Toole Award

Pious Ali

Pious Ali, Youth and Community Engagement Specialist in Cutler’s Children, Youth, and Families Programs, has been nominated for the Lawrence W. O’Toole Award by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation. Pious is one of six nominees from the New England states.

The Nellie Mae Education Foundation believes that student-centered learning – where learning is personalized, engaging, competency-based and not restricted to the classroom – will prepare young people to graduate high school ready to contribute to their communities and succeed. This award is given out each year to an individual, school district, or non-profit that has exhibited great leadership in moving student-centered approaches to learning forward in the New England region.

The winner will be selected by online voting and will be awarded a $100,000 grant to help advance student centered learning!


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