Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy

Disability and Aging, Population Health and Health Policy

Elise Bolda

Chair, Graduate Program in Public Health (MPH); Associate Research Professor
Elise Bolda

Office

413 Wishcamper Center

Contact Information

Phone: (207) 780-4847

Education: University of Vermont, BA, 1974; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, MSPH, 1986; PhD, 1995

Research Interests: Residential care/assisted living services, integration of acute and long-term care services, development and evaluation of community-based long-term care services

Professor Bolda teaches Organizational Leadership, Health Planning & Marketing, and a Research Seminar in Long Term Care Policy. Dr. Bolda currently serves as Project Director for North Carolina’s Dual Eligible Planning Grant helping to develop a strategic framework and implementation plan for an integrated delivery model to meet the needs of those eligible for Medicare and Medicaid. She served as the National Program Director for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Community Partnerships for Older Adults initiative from 2000-2010. Since joining the Muskie faculty in 1995, she has conducted applied policy analyses for Maine's Bureau of Medical Assistance and Maine's Bureau of Elder and Adult Services. She also has served as Principal Investigator for several Maine Rural Health Research Center long term care research projects. Elise began her career working with older adults and adults with disabilities, community leaders, and state policy makers in Vermont and in North Carolina.

Profile of Rural Residential Care Facilities Chartbook

Profile of Rural Residential Care Chartbook Cover

Using data from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities, this chartbook from the Maine Rural Health Research Center presents information on a slice of the rural LTSS continuum—the rural residential care facility (RCF).  Survey results identify important national and regional differences between rural and urban RCFs, focusing on the facility, resident and service characteristics of RCFs and their ability to meet the LTSS needs of residents.

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Dementia in Maine

Dementia in Maine

As the oldest state in the nation, Maine faces the impending impact of Alzheimer’s disease on its social systems, community resources, and its health and long term care systems. This report provides a baseline picture of the current use of services by people with and without dementia in Maine. Learn more in Dementia in Maine: Characteristics, Care, and Cost Across Settings.

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Report on Maine's Older Adults

With the aging of Maine’s population and its status as the oldest state in the nation, the use of long term services continues to be a critical public policy issue in the state and nationally. Learn more in Older Adults and Adults With Disabilities: Population and Service Use Trends in Maine, 2012 Edition.

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Long Term Service and Support Needs

Chartbook: Children and Adults with Long Term Service and Support Needs

This report - part of a series on MaineCare members who are dually eligible for MaineCare and Medicare Services - analyzes the characteristics, use, and expenditure patterns of sub-populations of long term service users. Learn more in Children and Adults With Long Term Services and Support Needs: MaineCare and Medicare Expenditures and Utilization, State Fiscal Year 2010.

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Hartley Retires as Director of the Maine Rural Health Research Center

David Hartley, PhD

David Hartley, PhD, the Director of the Maine Rural Health Research Center (MRHRC) and a Research Professor of Public Health has announced that he will be retiring from the University of Southern Maine August 31st, 2014. David came to the University in 1994 and has directed the MRHRC since 2004. Andy Coburn, PhD, Research Professor of Public Health, will take over as the new MRHRC Director. Erika Ziller, PhD continues in her role as Deputy Director. David has had a distinguished career in rural health and rural health research, and has made lasting contributions to the field with his work on rural behavioral health, rural disparities and health, and rural active living.

A celebration will be scheduled in early fall to honor David and his many contributions to the field and the University.

 

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