Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy

Population Health and Health Policy

Use of Mental Health Services by Rural Children

Abstract: 

This study examines rural and urban differences in the use of children's mental health services and the role that family income, health insurance, and mental health status play in explaining these differences. The analysis is based on three years of pooled data from the National Survey of America's Families (NSAF). Three research questions are examined: (1) What is the mental health need of children, age 6 to 17? (2) What percentage of children, with an identified mental health need, used a mental health service in the past year? What is the average number of mental health visits they received in the past year? (3) What role does family income and type of insurance have on the use of mental health services by children? Analyses show that rural and urban children both face substantial barriers to use of mental health services. Medicaid and SCHIP help all children, but particularly rural children who receive mental health care. This suggests that these public health insurance programs are important policy vehicles for enhancing the access of rural children to mental health care.

Publication Type: 
Working Paper
Publish Date: 
July 1, 2008
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/rural/WP39/Rural-Children-Mental-Health-Services.pdf

Profile of Rural Residential Care Facilities Chartbook

Profile of Rural Residential Care Chartbook Cover

Using data from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities, this chartbook from the Maine Rural Health Research Center presents information on a slice of the rural LTSS continuum—the rural residential care facility (RCF).  Survey results identify important national and regional differences between rural and urban RCFs, focusing on the facility, resident and service characteristics of RCFs and their ability to meet the LTSS needs of residents.

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