Justice Policy

Building Bridges Towards Safety and Accountability to End Domestic Violence Homicide

Abstract: 

The mission of the Maine Domestic Abuse Homicide Review Panel, authorized by legislation, is to engage in collaborative, multidisciplinary case review of domestic abuse related homicides for the purpose of developing recommendations for state and local government and other public and private entitites to improve the coordinated community response that will protect people from domestic abuse.

Barbara Hart, J.D., of the USM Muskie School of Public Service is a panel member and contributing advisor/editor of this report.

Suggested Citation: Maine Domestic Abuse Homicide Review Panel. (2014, April). Building bridges towards safety and accountability to end domestic violence homicide: The 10th report of the Maine Domestic Abuse Homicide Review Panel. Augusta, ME: The Panel.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
April 24, 2014
Author: 
URL: 
http://www.maine.gov/ag/dynld/documents/10th%20Biennnial%20Report%20-FINAL%204-23-14.pdf

Maine Crime & Justice Data Book 2014

Abstract: 

The 2014 Maine Crime and Justice Data Book presents a portrait of crime and justice indicators in the state, using the most recent public safety, corrections, and court data available for Maine. The reports looks at ten year trends in Maine, compares Maine figures with data from other northern New England states and the United States, and presents some county level findings as well.

 

This analysis is part of the Maine Statistical Analysis Center's (SAC) mission to provide criminal justice information to the general public and policymakers in Maine. For more information on other SAC studies, please visit their website at http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/justiceresearch/

 

Suggested Citation: Maine Statistical Analysis Center. (2014). Maine crime & justice data book 2014. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service.

 

 

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
April 1, 2014
Author: 
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/justiceresearch/Publications/DataBook2014/2014_Maine_Crime_and_Justice_Databook.pdf

Michelle Garcia Presents: Recognizing and Responding to Stalking

Event Date and Time: 
Thursday, March 27, 2014, 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM
Location: 
Lee Community Hall (Rm 133), Wishcamper Center, USM Portland Campus
Contact Name: 
Liz Bilodeau
Contact Phone: 
(207) 780-4996
Contact Email: 
lizjbilodeau@gmail.com


Recognizing and Responding to Stalking

Brown Bag Lunch and Learn with Michelle Garcia, Director, Stalking Resource Center, National Center for Victims of Crime.

FREE and OPEN to the public.

Michelle Garcia is nationally known for her trainings that aim to enhance the ability of professionals, organizations, and systems to respond effectively to stalking. This training from the Stalking Resource Center provides the tools for collaboration with the criminal justice system and its many allied community partners. The goal is to effectively respond to stalking, improve victim safety and well-being, and hold offenders accountable.


Note to USM faculty/staff: This event qualifies for 20 USM Wellness Program RiseUp points.

Practical Implications of Current Intimate Partner Violence Research for Victim Advocates and Service Providers

Abstract: 

This guide uses a question-and-answer format to inform victim advocates and service providers of the findings of published research on intimate partner violence (IPV) and their relevance for practice. The first of 13 sections of the guide poses and answers 11 questions pertinent to the issue, “What is intimate partner violence?” The issues addressed include the various behaviors and circumstances that constitute IPV, whether men and women are equally likely to be victims or perpetrators of IPV, and whether women’s use of IPV is different from men’s.The second major section poses and answers 12 questions related to IPV victimization rates, addressing issues of populations at increased risk for IPV, with special attention to women who are separated or divorced, pregnant, disabled, elderly, LGBT, live in rural areas. The guide’s third section poses and answers 19 questions related to the impact of IPV on victims. The fourth section poses and answers 20 questions related to the characteristics of persons who perpetrate IPV.  Other sections of the guide pose and answer questions related to victim characteristics that predict IPV victimization; whether IPV victims seek assistance and services; protective factors and coping skills that mitigate the adverse impact of IPV; the services that are typically available to IPV victims; whether victim services work; health-care providers’ role in responding to IPV; what victim advocates and service providers need to know about the legal system; the features of IPV victim advocacy; and the performance measures advocates should adopt in evaluating the criminal justice response to IPV.  The implications drawn from the research are offered as guidance, not rules of practice. 884 references are provided.

This document is a research report submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice. This report has not been published by the Department. Opinions or points of view expressed are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

For more information, please contact Barbara Hart, JD, barbarha@aol.com

Suggested Citation:  Hart BJ, Klein AF. Practical Implications of Current Intimate Partner Violence Research for Victim Advocates and Service Providers. Washington, DC: National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, National Criminal Justice Reference Service; January, 2013. NCJ 244348.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
December 31, 2013
Author: 
URL: 
https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/grants/244348.pdf

LGBTI Populations: Their Safety, Your Responsibility

Abstract: 

Erica King, Policy Associate in the Muskie School of Public Service, was the featured policy advisor for this 3-hour broadcast on November 7, 2012, which is meant to inform and increase awareness of strategies for developing policies and procedures for LGBTI populations. The broadcast highlighted promising practices by providing resources and examples of agencies who are responding to the needs of the LGBTI population in their setting. During this national discussion sponsored and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections, presenters defined a framework for developing strategies for ensuring the safety, dignity, and respect of LGBTI individuals in corrections settings; identified typical concerns and challenges that arise as agencies address the needs and requirements of LGBTI offenders in corrections settings; identified operational practices that can increase effectiveness of working with LGBTI offenders; and reviewed and discussed effective policy and program development strategies that address LGBTI populations in corrections.

Suggested Citation: LGBTI Populations: Their Safety, Your Responsibility [Satellite/Internet Broadcast] [2 DVDs]. Washington, DC: National Institute of Corrections; November 7,2012.

Publication Type: 
Video
Publish Date: 
November 7, 2012
Author: 
URL: 
http://nicic.gov/library/026763

Connecting to the Community: A Case Study in Women's Resettlement Needs and Experiences

Abstract: 

Suggested Citation:

Boober BH, King EH. Connecting to the Community: A Case Study in Women's Resettlement Needs and Experiences. In: Sheehan R, McIvor G, Trotter C, eds. Working with Women Offenders in the Community. Abingdon U.K.; New York: Willan; 2011:319-341

Publication Type: 
Book Chapter
Publish Date: 
January 1, 2011
Author: 

Advancing the Use of CBT with Justice-Involved Women

Abstract: 

Forensic CBT: A Handbook for Clinical Practice is an edited collection that represents the first authoritative resource on the utilization of Cognigive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) strategies and techniques for offender clients.

Erica King, Policy Associate at the USM Muskie School of Public Services is co-author with Dr. Marilyn Van Dieten on chapter 16 in Part III of the book, Tailoring CBT to Special Forensic Populations, which looks at cognitive behavioral therapy for justice-involved women.  The authors highlight the differential needs of justice-involved women and discuss how to conduct gener-responsive treatment.

The book features contributions from leaders of the major schools of CBT on the treatment of antisocial personality patterns as well as anger, interpersonal violence, substance abuse, and sexual aggression; Addresses modified CBT approaches for female, juvenile, and culturally diverse forensic populations; Covers emerging areas of forensic practices, including the integration of motivational interviewing and strength-based approaches; and Includes an assortment of worksheets, handouts, and exercises for practitioners to use with their clients.

Suggested Citation:

Van Dieten, M., & King, E. (2013). Advancing the use of CBT with justice-involved women. In R. C. Tafrate & D. Mitchell (Eds.), Forensic CBT: A handbook for clinical practice (pp. 329-353). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

Publication Type: 
Book Chapter
Publish Date: 
November 1, 2013
Author: 
URL: 
http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1119953286.html

Pages

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