Maine Rural Health Research Center

John Gale featured in Rural Monitor article

John Gale, Research Associate at the Maine Rural Health Research Center, USM Muskie School, discusses the potential for rural safety net providers to become a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). In the August 20th edition of the Rural Monitor, Gale provides information on the challenges and opportunities rural health clinics face in meeting standards for PCMH recognition. According to Gale’s research, rural safety net providers face greater challenges than urban counterparts, including staffing shortages and limited resources, and patient populations that are low-income, often uninsured and less likely to become engaged in their personal care. Findings from his research will be published in a forthcoming report from the Maine Rural Health Research Center.
John Gale

Profile of Rural Residential Care Facilities: A Chartbook

Abstract: 

As federal and state policymakers consider their most cost-effective options for strengthening rural long-term services and supports (LTSS), more information is needed about the current system of care. Using data from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities, this chartbook from the Maine Rural Health Research Center presents information on a slice of the rural LTSS continuum—the rural residential care facility (RCF).  Survey results identify important national and regional differences between rural and urban RCFs, focusing on the facility, resident and service characteristics of RCFs and their ability to meet the LTSS needs of residents.  Rural RCFs are more likely to have private pay patients compared to urban facilities and their residents have fewer disabilities as measured by their functional assistance needs.  Compared to urban facilities, the policies of rural RCFs appear less likely to support aging in place.

Suggested Citation: Lenardson JD, Griffin E, Croll Z, Ziller EC, Coburn AF. Profile of Rural Residential Care Facilities: A Chartbook. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center; May, 2014.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
May 20, 2014
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/rural/Chartbook-Rural-Res-Care-Facilities.pdf

Rural Residents More Likely to be Enrolled in High Deductible Health Plans

Abstract: 

Enrollment in high deductible health plans (HDHPs) has increased amid concerns about growing health care costs to patients, employers, and insurers. Prior research indicates that rural individuals are more likely than their urban counterparts to face high out-of-pocket health care costs relative to income, despite coverage through private health insurance, a difference related both to the lower income of rural residents generally and to the quality of the private plans through which they have coverage. Using the 2007-2010 National Health Interview Survey, this study examines rural residents’ enrollment in HDHPs and the implications for evolving Affordable Care Act Health Insurance Marketplaces.

Rural residents with private insurance are more likely to have an HDHP than are urban, especially when they live in remote, rural areas. Among those covered by an HDHP, rural residents are more likely to have low incomes and more limited educational attainment than urban residents, suggesting that it will be important to monitor HDHP enrollment, plan affordability, and health plan literacy among plans available through the Health Insurance Marketplaces.

Full report (Working Paper): High Deductible Health Insurance Plans in Rural Areas

Suggested Citation: Lenardson JD, Ziller EC, Coburn AF. Rural Residents More Likely to Be Enrolled in High Deductible Health Plans. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center; May, 2014. Research & Policy Brief PB-55.

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
May 13, 2014
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/rural/PB55-High-Deductible-Health-Plans-Rural.pdf

High Deductible Health Insurance Plans in Rural Areas

Abstract: 

Enrollment in high deductible health plans (HDHPs) has increased amid concerns about growing health care costs to patients, employers, and insurers. Prior research indicates that rural individuals are more likely than their urban counterparts to face high out-of-pocket health care costs relative to income, despite coverage through private health insurance, a difference related both to the lower income of rural residents generally and to the quality of the private plans through which they have coverage. Using the 2007-2010 National Health Interview Survey, this study examines rural residents’ enrollment in HDHPs and the implications for evolving Affordable Care Act Health Insurance Marketplaces.

Rural residents with private insurance are more likely to have an HDHP than are urban, especially when they live in remote, rural areas. Among those covered by an HDHP, rural residents are more likely to have low incomes and more limited educational attainment than urban residents, suggesting that it will be important to monitor HDHP enrollment, plan affordability, and health plan literacy among plans available through the Health Insurance Marketplaces.

Associated Research & Policy Brief: Rural Residents More Likely to be Enrolled in High Deductible Health Plans

Suggested Citation: Lenardson JD, Ziller EC, Coburn AF. High Deductible Health Insurance Plans in Rural Areas. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service, Maine Rural Health Research Center; May, 2014. Working Paper #55.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
May 13, 2014
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/rural/High-Deductible-Insurance-Plans-Rural.pdf

Rural Implementation and Impact of Rural Medicaid Expansions

Event Date and Time: 
Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM
Location: 
Webinar
Contact Name: 
Erika Ziller
Contact Phone: 
207-780-4615
Contact Email: 
eziller@usm.maine.edu

The impact of the ACA Medicaid expansion on health care coverage and access in rural areas is largely unknown and will depend on the different state policy contexts in which the expansions are implemented and on existing system capacity. Understanding how many rural residents are likely to become newly eligible for Medicaid under the ACA, as well as their characteristics and health status, will provide important information to aid policymakers in structuring outreach and enrollment strategies and ensuring that the healthcare infrastructure and delivery systems in rural areas can address the needs of these individuals. 
 
On March 18th, Dr. Erika Ziller, Deputy Director of the Maine Rural Health Research Center at the University of Southern Maine, will present via a webinar, nationally representative information identifying rural-urban differences among low-income non-elderly adults (18 to 65) in the following areas:

  • Medicaid eligibility, pre-ACA
  • Medicaid participation, pre-ACA
  • New Medicaid eligibility in 2014

Dr. Ziller will also analyze the characteristics associated with any rural-urban differences in the above areas. Characteristics to be considered include age, gender, employment, education, income, Census region, health status, current relationship to primary care provider, primary care supply, and FQHC availability.

Register for the free webinar at: https://cc.readytalk.com/cc/s/registrations/new?cid=hoyjw9mp1en8

This webinar is based on Dr. Ziller's research under a State Health Access Reform Evaluation (SHARE) grant to inform federal and state implementation of the ACA Medicaid expansion by estimating the size and characteristics of the rural population likely to be newly eligible.

Ziller co-authors chapter on children's health policy

Children's Health Policy: Promising Starts, Disappointing Outcomes, co-authored by Beth Kilbreth, PhD (Muskie School faculty, retired) and Erika Ziller, PhD (Deputy Director, Maine Rural Health Research Center), explores the many federal and state programs addressing the health concerns of children. This chapter is part of a collection of writings on the factors that shape the US healthcare system and policy, published in the 5th edition of Health Politics and Policy, a widely used text in university courses on health policy.
Health Policy and Politics 5th edition book cover

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