Population Health and Health Policy

Gale receives NRHA Volunteer of the Year award

John Gale, Senior Research Associate with the Maine Rural Health Research Center, was presented with the 2015 National Rural Health Association (NRHA) Volunteer of the Year Award at NRHA's 38th Annual Rural Health Conference April 16 in Philadelphia. To view the video go to :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xowct9wOYME&list=PLrLzXxrhUwSf-FTs0Erkcj4E8i_3AMAFe&index=10.
photo: John Gale at national Rural Health Association

Ziller and Joly present at Sino-American International Research Forum

As part of the 2-day Sino-American International Research Forum, Dr. Erika Ziller and Dr. Brenda Joly of the USM Muskie School presented their research on Rural Implications of Medicaid Expansion under the Affordable Care Act and Partnerships to Improve Community Health. Participants in the forum will have their research published in the NAAAS monograph series.

Webinar on Integrating Behavioral Health in Rural Primary Care

John Gale of the Maine Rural Health Research Center, USM Muskie School, will be co-presenting a webinar on rural behavioral health and primary care integration issues on 2/26/15 from 2-3:30 pm ET. Join this webinar to get an overview of integration models used in rural settings, planning best practices, financing considerations, and implementation strategies for primary care and behavioral health providers to collaborate and better meet the behavioral health needs of their communities.

Early Lessons Learned in Implementing MaineCare Health Homes

Abstract: 

This Issue Brief, authored by researchers at the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School, highlights key lessons learned from the first year of implementation of the MaineCare Health Homes Initiative.

Key Findings:

  • MaineCare's Health Homes Initiative has expanded Maine's capacity for chronic care management in primary care practices and community care teams (CCTs);
  • CCTs provide valuable additional support to patients of Health Homes, including home visits and social supports in the community;
  • Flexibility in program design allowed for wide variation of service delivery models within CCTs;
  • Three percent of Health Home members were referred to CCTs by the end of the first year, but overall practice referral rates varied by CCT--from 1% to 7% of Health Home members within their associated practices.

To view or download the full study, click here

To view or download the Issue Brief on enrollment in the first year of MaineCare Health Homes implementation, click here

Suggested Citation: Fox K, Gray C, Rosingana K. Early Lessons Learned in Implementing MaineCare Health Homes. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service; September, 2014.

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
September 30, 2014
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/PHHP/MaineCare-HealthHomes-Implementation.pdf

MaineCare Health Homes Enrollment in the First Year of Implementation

Abstract: 

This Issue Brief, authored by researchers at the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School, highlights enrollment trends and characteristics of MaineCare's Health Homes initiative during the first year of implementation.

Key Findings:

  • MaineCare initially estimated 42,000 members were Health Home eligible; 48,000 members were enrolled by December 2013;
  • Health Homes practices increased referrals to Community Care Team (CCT) services over the course of the first year of the initiative, increasing from 60 members enrolled in CCTs in January 2013 to 1,392 in Decmber (3% of Health Home members);
  • Health Home members had an average of three chronic conditions.  Two out of the five most common conditions were behavioral health related.

To view or download the full study click here

To view or download the Issue Brief on implementation in the first year of MaineCare's Health Home Initiative click here

Suggested Citation: Fox K, Gray C, Rosingana K. MaineCare Health Homes Enrollment in the First Year of Implementation. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, Muskie School of Public Service; September, 2014.

Publication Type: 
Research and Policy Brief
Publish Date: 
September 30, 2014
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/PHHP/MaineCare-HealthHomes-Enrollment.pdf

Rural and Remote Food Environments and Obesity

Abstract: 

Researchers at the Maine Rural Health Research Center Rural have published a review in the January 2015 issue of Current Obesity Reports describing the rural community, home, and individual food environments and what is known about their roles in healthy eating.

Abstract: Rural residents are more likely to be obese and overweight compared to their urban counterparts. Studies of specific rural communities have found that the limited availability of healthy foods in the community and home as well as individual characteristics and preferences contribute to poor diet and overweight. The rural food environment is varied and may be affected by climate, regional and cultural preferences, transportation access, and remoteness among other factors. Given this diversity and the vulnerabilities of rural residents, who are more likely to have low-income, substandard housing or low educational attainment compared to their urban counterparts, policy and programmatic interventions should target specific needs and communities.

Suggested Citation: Lenardson, J. D., Hansen, A. Y., & Hartley, D. (2015). Rural and remote food environments and obesity. Current Obesity Reports. doi: 10.1007/s13679-014-0136-5

Publication Type: 
Journal Article
Publish Date: 
January 30, 2015
URL: 
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs13679-014-0136-5#page-1

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