USM Online

Fall 2013 Online Program Scheduled Courses

ABU 190 Spreadsheet & Problem Solving (2 online sections)
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
An examination of problem-solving techniques using modern computer applications software. Primary focus is on the use of electronic spreadsheets as a problem-solving tool, including proper spreadsheet model design and the use of appropriate graphical representation of model results. Other computer problem-solving software is examined. Interpretation and effective communication of results, both written and oral, are practiced. Prerequisite: MAT 101 or equivalent proficiency and computer literacy. 3 credits.

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ACC 110 Financial Accounting Information for Decision Making
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course is designed to help students appreciate the role of accountants in providing information helpful to decisions of investors, creditors, government regulators, and others, and how that information can be used. Emphasis is on understanding the meaning and value of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. The role of the auditor, internal controls, and ethical issues are examined. The annual report is used to explore how corporations apply accounting principles in presentations to the public. Prerequisites: minimum of 12 earned credit hours and evidence of successfully meeting the University's writing and mathematics proficiency requirements. 3 credits.

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BUS 260 Marketing
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)
This course is an introduction to the field of marketing. Topics include marketing strategy for products and services, market segmentation, product issues, pricing, promotion, distribution, consumer behavior, marketing research and information systems, international marketing, and nonprofit marketing. Prerequisite: minimum of 24 earned credit hours.
3 credits.

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BUS 275 Applied Business Analysis
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course provides students with an understanding of statistical concepts and tools that are critical in business decision making. The discussion and development of each topic are presented in an application setting, with the statistical results providing insights and solutions to real world problems. The coursework requires extensive use of commercially available statistical software. Prerequisite: ABU 190 (C or higher grade, or test out option), MAT 108 (C- or higher grade) and MAT 210 (C- or higher grade) or other approved statistics course (see www.usm.maine.edu/sb/stats.html for approved courses). 3 credits.

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BUS 345 Information Technology/MIS
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
Surveys information/systems technology for the management of corporate information as a resource. Managerial and technical dimensions of information systems are blended in a framework of information technology. Specific topics will evolve with the field but may include data communications, information systems theory, database concepts, and decision support systems. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. 3 credits.

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BUS 370 Management Science
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)
This course examines the role, perspective, and commonly used tools of quantitative analysis in business decision making. Emphasis is placed upon developing students' abilities to recognize the need for quantification; formulate business problems quantitatively; select and test computer-based, decision-support system models; collect meaningful data; and interpret the implications of analysis results. Prerequisites: ABU 190 (C or higher grade, or test-out option), BUS 275 or MAT 212, 2.0 GPA and junior standing. Students with credit for BUS 270 or BUS 371 may not enroll.
3 credits.

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CMS 102 Intro to Communications (2 online sections)
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course provides students with an overview and brief history of the field of communication, introduces them to theory development and the research process, and illustrates how communication theories can be applied to everyday life. Students will explore communication in a variety of contexts, including intrapersonal, organizational, intercultural, and mass communication. 3 credits.

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CMS 103 Intro to Media Studies
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course examines the historical, philosophical, technological, economic, political, and social aspects of print (book, magazine, and newspapers) and electronic media (radio, television, film, sound recordings, and the Internet). In addition, the effect of mass media will be explored. Prerequisite: media studies or communication major. 3 credits.

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CMS 200 Research Methods in Communications
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course introduces students to methods of inquiry found in the communication and media studies research literature. These methods include experimental design, survey research, textual analysis, and ethnography. The course examines the underlying philosophical assumptions associated with these methodologies as well as their unique strengths and limitations. Students' conceptual understanding of these methodologies and their ability to become critical consumers of research findings are the major objectives of the course. Prerequisite: communication or media studies major, CMS 102. 3 credits.

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CMS 265 Intrapersonal Communication
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course examines our ability to use what we know and feel in order to send, receive, and store information. Whether stimuli come from an external source or from within the self, the focus of intrapersonal communication is on the ways in which we process those stimuli, our ability to make sense out of our experiences, to remember, to retrieve information from memory, and to create messages at whatever level of consciousness, and no matter how many people are involved, in face-to-face or mediated communication. Prerequisites: communication or media studies major, CMS 102 and CMS 103.  3 credits.

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CMS 298 Topics in Communication: Media, Culture, & Society
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
A selection of courses varying in content from term to term.  May be repeated for credit when topics vary.  Students should consult MaineStreet for a listing of current topics courses and the CMS homepage for detailed course descriptions. Prerequisites: communication or media studies major,  CMS 102 and CMS 103.  3 credits.

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CMS 310 Topics in Media Criticism II: Movies-Sirk, Fassbinder, & Haynes
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
A selection of courses varying in content from term to term. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult their media studies advisor for detailed descriptions. Prerequisites: communication or media studies major, CMS 102 and CMS 103. 3 credits.

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CMS 330 Theories of Interpersonal Communication
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
A study of the current thinking in interpersonal communication which emphasizes specific theories of human interaction. Students will be exposed to research in the interpersonal setting and will apply findings to their personal relationships. The course will help students foster effective traditional and nontraditional relationships with a variety of people. Prerequisites: communication or media studies major, CMS 102 and CMS 103. 3 credits.

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CMS 345 Small Group Communication
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the theories and techniques associated with group behavior. The course explores the topics of leadership, conflict resolution, group climate, and decision making. Through simulations and exercises students learn methods for analyzing group process and their own behavior. Students' findings are reported in preliminary and final papers. Prerequisites: communication or media studies major, CMS 102 and CMS 103. 3 credits.

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CMS 380 Film Genres: Film Noir
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course will explore a genre found in film history. The genre selected for any given semester could be taken from such established ones as science fiction, horror, screwball comedies, musicals, or film noir. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: CMS 102, CMS 103, and CMS 284 and communication or media studies major. 3 credits.

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CMS 430 Communication Internship
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
An in-depth experience in specific areas of communication acquired in the field. Students will focus their efforts in an area related to their choice of communication expertise (i.e., organizational communication, mass communication, interpersonal communication). Prerequisites: CMS 102, CMS 103. and a precise definition of the project and director's consent. Pass/fail only. Restricted to communication majors, or permission of the instructor.  1-15 credits.

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CMS 495 Theories of Communication
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course is designed for upperclass students who are majoring or minoring in communication studies. Based on a seminar format, students in this course will explore in depth several advanced theories of communication, mechanistic through interactive, with examples and application for each. Prerequisites: CMS 102, CMS 103, CMS 200, communication major with a minimum of 90 credit hours. 3 credits.

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CMS 498 Topics in Communication III:Gender Communication
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
A selection of courses varying in content from term to term. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult MaineStreet for a listing of current topics courses and the CMS homepage for detailed course descriptions.  Prerequisites: Communication or media studies major, CMS 102, CMS 103, and CMS 200 and junior or senior standing. 3 credits.

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CON 313 Health in Later Years
7-Week Online: 1st Session (September 3 - October 25)
This course is designed for students from diverse fields who are interested in health and aging. The population of older adults in the United States is growing at a rate that is unprecedented in American history and no matter what your career path this growth will impact you. Knowledge about illness, medications, physical activity, nutrition, sexuality, health care delivery, and death and dying will be presented. Students will obtain essential information needed to provide effective care for aging clients, patients, loved ones, and themselves. Community experiences are required.
3 credits.

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ECO 101 Introduction to Macroeconomics
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
An analysis of the basic characteristics, institutions, and activities of modern market economies. Topics discussed include inflation, unemployment, government monetary and fiscal policy, full employment and economic growth.  Prerequisite: none. This course will satisfy a second-tier Socio-Cultural Analysis Core curriculum requirement. Every semester.  3 credits.

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ECO 102 Introduction to Microeconomics
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
Introduction to the analysis of individual markets: the functioning of prices in a market economy, economic decision making by producers and consumers, and market structure. Topics discussed include consumer preferences and consumer behavior, production theory and production costs, the monopoly firm, and resource pricing. Additional topics are determined by individual instructors.  This course will satisfy a second-tier Socio-Cultural Analysis Core curriculum requirement. Prerequisite: none. Every semester. 3 credits.

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ENG 245 Intro to Literary Studies
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This is a required course for all English majors. It may be taken concurrently with other 200-level courses in the Department, but is a prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level courses except those in creative writing. The course will have a double focus. Students will be introduced to a variety of methodologies important to an insightful analysis of literature and other cultural texts. They will also learn research procedures and techniques of effective critical writing. Every semester.  3 credits.

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ENG 348 Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies: Empire, Ethics & Globalization
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course investigates literature in relation to other disciplines, with an emphasis on how various fields of knowledge contextualize and elucidate our understanding of literary production. Topics may vary and include, for example, anthropology and drama, Freud and literature, literature and technology, and parallel movements in art and/or music and literature. Because of the diverse range of interdisciplinary studies, material is drawn from film, video, music, and art, as well as from printed texts. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions. 3 credits.

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ENG 399 Topics
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
Course topics vary, please visit MaineStreet class search for further details.
3 credits.

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FIN 320 Basic Financial Management
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course is a balanced introduction to the theory and practice of financial management. It prepares students to make basic financial decisions and understand the decisions of others. Topics include time value of money, capital markets, risk and return, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure, and working capital management. Prerequisites: ACC 110 (C- or higher), ECO 101 or ECO 102, MAT 210 (C- or higher) or other approved statistics course (see www.usm.maine.edu/sb/stats.html for approved courses), and junior standing. 3 credits.

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HTY 101 Western Civilization I
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
A basic survey and introduction to the heritage of Western society from ancient to early-modern times. Particular attention is given to the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Greece and Rome. Medieval civilization is explored with a focus on the institutions it bequeathed to the modern world. The Renaissance and Reformation and the rise of the great nation-states are studied. Throughout the course important individuals are considered such as Alexander the Great, Caesar, Charlemagne, Michelangelo, and Elizabeth I. The course also introduces students to historical method.
3 credits.

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ITP 250 Management Information Systems
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course will serve as an introduction to management information systems in areas such as:  decision support systems, resource and human resource management, enterprise resource planning, supply chain management, customer relationship management, project management, and records management.  Topics covered will include but are not limited to:  systems analysis, system modeling and design, data acquisition, security, and maintenance.  Offered fall semester only. 3 credits.

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ITP 280 Industrial Organization, Management, and Supervision
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
An introduction to industrial organization and management. A study of the common elements of industry as it relates to the areas of research and development; industrial relations; production; financial control; marketing; and labor. Management and supervisory theory and practices will be highlighted. Emphasis will also be placed upon contemporary issues/problems/trends associated with a global economy. 3 credits.

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LCC 150 Statistics for Informed Decision Making
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course introduces and applies quantitative analyses to address real world questions. It applies descriptive statistics, sampling and significance testing, correlation, and regression analysis to issues related to the four themes of the Core. The course provides the opportunity to interpret and analyze statistical decision making, and identifies data misconceptions and misuses. 3 credits.

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LCC 370 Toward a Global Ethics
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This writing instruction course assists students in articulating and assessing their own values. It examines the range of ethical theories and positions and explores the influence of particular cultural ideologies on ethical beliefs. The course considers the ethical principles implied by democracy, sustainability, justice, and difference. It examines ethical issues and dilemmas faced by individuals, organizations, and nations while exploring personal and collective decision-making processes in a global context. Prerequisite: Core Area C. 4 credits.

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LIN 185 Language, Mind, & Society (3 online sections)
7-Week Online: 1st Session (September 3 - October 28)
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course approaches language as a biological and psychological phenomenon central to an adequate understanding of human nature. It deals with linguistic questions concerning the grammars of natural languages and how these may vary across cultures and across time, but also with questions about how the human mind and brain both provide for and constrain linguistic ability. The course also addresses questions about how language develops in the child, how it deteriorates under the influence of disease and injury, how it evolved in the history of the species, and what functions it plays in human life. The course does not assume any background in linguistics or foreign languages. 3 credits.

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LOS 299 Writing in the Major
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This lab is designed to be taken in conjunction with LOS 300 and is required of all LOS majors. 1 credit.

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LOS 301 Group Dynamics
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course gives students an understanding of how people behave in groups and the skills needed by group members to participate effectively in group activities. It provides a theoretical foundation for how groups function, with focus on group process and development; and it discusses how these theories can be applied to a wide range of group settings. This course uses experiential techniques to help students develop critical skills and understanding of group dynamics. 3 credits.

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LOS 310 Science, Technology and Society
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course will examine not only the classic question of how technology shapes society, but also the less-frequently considered question of how society shapes technology using timely, internationally-focused examples to illustrate the social, political, economic, and cultural dimensions of technology.  Through an intercultural perspective, students will grow to understand that technological changes and events are a worldwide phenomenon.  Contemporary themes, including nuclear threats, television violence, and the environment will help students understand the forces that produce technological change and the consequences that result. 3 credits.

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LOS 311 Leading through the Arts
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
Students in this class will learn basic concepts of leadership and art, analyze the ways in which leaders use art to motivate people and articulate their visions, examine the ways in which art motivates people to bring about change in society, and design a work of art that intends to motivate people, elevate people, and call for change. 3 credits.

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LOS 312 Human Resource Management
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course focuses on the procedures and processes associated with the management of human resources within organizations. Topics include recruitment, staff development, job analysis, personnel systems, and training. 3 credits.

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LOS 316 Diversity in Organizations
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
Using historical, socio-economic, and psychological perspectives, students learn about the challenges diverse members of U.S. society, such as women, people of color, people from marginalized classes, and those from other countries have had and continue to face. Students gain an understanding of how the workplace may affect diverse peoples and how others can learn to make the workplace more hospitable. A primary focus of this course is on examining beliefs, behaviors, or unconscious attitudes that perpetuate the oppression and subordination of diverse members of society in the workplace, while also looking at how increased diversity is adding to workplace productivity, creativity, and learning. Readings are drawn from the social sciences and humanities to provide an interdisciplinary approach to the topic. 3 credits.

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LOS 318  Database Management
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course introduces skills and builds proficiency in database management. It is taught on PC computers using the latest version of Microsoft Access and is designed to help students develop competencies in a variety of database processing functions. Students become proficient in setting up databases, managing data, creating reports, using report enhancements, and manipulating data. Prerequisite: LAC 150 or equivalent. 3 credits.

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LOS 327 Leading Through Conflict
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
Conflict management is explored as an essential leadership tool and analyzed as a necessary component of healthy systems and innovations. We will investigate techniques that help individuals and groups mediate and negotiate differences encountered in a variety of situations. 3 credits.

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LOS 329 Research Methods
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods which can be used in organizational planning and decision making and in the social and behavioral sciences. The course will cover topic areas related to the application of appropriate methods of inquiry and includes completion of an applied project. Strongly recommended for students going on to graduate school, careers in consulting, or human resource management. Prerequisite: LCC 150D. 3 credits.

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LOS 333 Portfolio Development
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This Portfolio Development course is offered to the adult learner who is preparing a competency based, experiential, academic portfolio, documenting their college-level knowledge, competencies, and abilities. This course supports students in improving their skills and knowledge needed to document and communicate their prior learning in the area of leadership and organizational studies.  The student's documentation proves their understanding of and competence in the subject matter, and may require some form of demonstration of performance in addition to the written portion. Additionally, students enhance their skills at recognizing the prior learning of others, e.g. potential employees or committee members, and develop their knowledge of and ability to reflect on their professional practice.  At the end of the course, students submit a completed academic portfolio to USM's Office of Prior Learning for assessment regarding possible additional credits. 3 credits.

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LOS 350 Leadership
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
A foundational course for students of leadership, this course examines the theory, research, techniques, and challenges of leadership in organizations. Organizational culture is studied with emphasis on the leader's role in influencing and decision making. An experiential design is used along with traditional classroom techniques to help students reflect upon their personal leadership styles and examine their approaches to leading and managing others in diverse organizational settings.  Students in the LOS major must complete this required course with a grade of a B- or better as a condition of their degree. 3 credits.

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LOS 369 Explore Careers, Choosing Life Role
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. 1.5 credits.

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LOS 413 Job Search Skills 21st Century
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer. 1.5 credits.

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LOS 440 Organizational Change and Development
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course explores the theory, research, and processes of leading, managing, and adapting to organizational change. Case studies and experiential learning are used to examine the effectiveness of change efforts and their impact on the group and individual. Prerequisite: LOS 300 or permission of instructor. LOS 329 or equivalent is also encouraged.
3 credits.

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LOS 447 Internship
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413. Offered fall, spring, summer. 3-6 credits.

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LSH 240 Introducing the Humanities
7-Week Online: 1st Session (September 3 - October 25)
This course examines the origins, development, and future of the humanities through the texts and methods of the following disciplines: classics, history, literary studies, philosophy, religion and the arts. 3 credits.

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LSH 340 Topics in Humanities: Discourses of Self-Determination
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
Consideration of selected problems, approaches, issues or themes in the humanities.  May be repeated for credit. 3 credits.

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LSH 340 Topics in Humanities: Maine Hist thru Art, Literature &Film
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)
Consideration of selected problems, approaches, issues or themes in the humanities.  May be repeated for credit. 3 credits.

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LSH 340 Topics in Humanities: Media, Culture, & Society
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
Consideration of selected problems, approaches, issues or themes in the humanities.  May be repeated for credit. 3 credits.

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LSH 440 Capstone in the Humanities
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)
This course probes the relationship between humanism and the humanities in contemporary society, the recent crisis of the humanities in higher education, and new directions in digital and global humanities. 3 credits.

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MAT 120 Introduction to Statistics (2 online sections)
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
An introduction to probability and statistics through lecture and lab. Particular topics include random variables and their distributions, methods of descriptive statistics, estimation and hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation. Prerequisite: successful completion of the University¿s college readiness requirement in mathematics. 4 credits.

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MAT 210 Business Statistics
15-Week Online (September 3-December 23)
This course investigates graphical and numerical methods of descriptive statistics; basic probability; discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions (binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, uniform, exponential, and normal); sampling distributions; estimation; tests of hypotheses; and other selected topics. Applications will be chosen primarily from business. Prerequisite: MAT 108 (may be taken concurrently).4 credits. 

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PHI 107 Introduction to Philosophy: World Philosophy
(2 online sections)
7-Week Online: 1st Session (September 3 - October 28)
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)

This course presents the world views of philosophers from ancient to contemporary times. The thinkers will be chosen from a broad range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Emphasis will be placed on the wide diversity and historical background of philosophical positions.  This course satisfies the Cultural Interpretation requirement of the new Core Curriculum.  Prerequisite: A college writing course. 3 credits.

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PHI 211 Media Ethics
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (September 3 - October 25)
In the information age, media play an increasingly large role in our lives. Our notion of living in a global society is largely shaped by media. What is responsible journalism? Does violent programming contribute to violence in America? What are professional ethics and how should they guide media practitioners? We will discuss these questions by examining key ethical values in media such as: privacy, confidentiality, truth telling, conflicts of interest, and social responsibility. We will also explore some fundamental issues in ethical theory such as: Why be ethical? What is ethics? How do ethical theories differ? What are the best ways to evaluate and apply ethical theories to media controversies today? The course is designed for majors in philosophy, media studies, and communication as well as other interested students.  The course satisfies the Ethical Inquiry, Social Responsibility and Citizenship requirement of the Core Curriculum. Prerequisite:  PHI 100-level course. 3 credits.

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PHI 211 Media Ethics
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)
In the information age, media play an increasingly large role in our lives. Our notion of living in a global society is largely shaped by media. What is responsible journalism? Does violent programming contribute to violence in America? What are professional ethics and how should they guide media practitioners? We will discuss these questions by examining key ethical values in media such as: privacy, confidentiality, truth telling, conflicts of interest, and social responsibility. We will also explore some fundamental issues in ethical theory such as: Why be ethical? What is ethics? How do ethical theories differ? What are the best ways to evaluate and apply ethical theories to media controversies today? The course is designed for majors in philosophy, media studies, and communication as well as other interested students.  The course satisfies the Ethical Inquiry, Social Responsibility and Citizenship requirement of the Core Curriculum. Prerequisite:  PHI 100-level course. 3 credits.

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PHI 220 Philosophy of Art
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)
What makes a person creative?  What do artists think about their art?  How do critics evaluate a work?   If art is created for a cultural ritual or healing, is it to be understood differently?  How do the circumstances of a work's creation and reception influence its evaluation?  How do a person's class, ethnicity, and gender influence the artwork and its reception.  Philosophers in the field of Aesthetics attempt to answer questions which artists, art historians, anthropologists, and critics ask about art. The works of art and philosophy considered will be drawn from a wide variety of cultural contexts.  Prerequisite: PHI 100-level course. 3 credits.

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PHI 409 Research Seminar
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)
A research seminar designed to provide senior level students an opportunity to participate in the research efforts of individual faculty and collaborate with each other in the design, methodology and completion of their tutorials. Prerequisites: advanced standing as a philosophy major and permission of the Department. 3 credits.

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STH 300 Partnering with Family Caregivers
7-Week Online: 2nd Session (October 28 - December 23)
Connecting with family caregivers is crucial for the delivery of a successful care plan. This course explores how providers can address the psychosocial challenges of caring for an aging family member. Family caregivers are responsible for providing the majority of long term care for people who are living with chronic illness and progressive dementia. We will examine the challenges that impact caregiving including physical, emotional and spiritual strain, and how health care providers and social service professionals can provide information, resources and support that will lead to sustainable outcomes for both the caregiver and the care recipient. It is recommended that the students have junior/senior status, have a college writing course and at least one course in either psychology or sociology. 3 credits.

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