USM Online

Fall 2014 Online Program Scheduled Courses

ABU 190 Spreadsheet and Problem Solving
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
An examination of problem-solving techniques using modern computer applications software. Primary focus is on the use of electronic spreadsheets as a problem-solving tool, including proper spreadsheet model design and the use of appropriate graphical representation of model results. Other computer problem-solving software is examined. Interpretation and effective communication of results, both written and oral, are practiced. Prerequisite: MAT 101 or equivalent proficiency and computer literacy. Cr 3.

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ACC 110 Financial Accounting Informaiton for Decision-Making
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course is designed to help students appreciate the role of accountants in providing information helpful to decisions of investors, creditors, government regulators, and others, and how that information can be used. Emphasis is on understanding the meaning and value of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. The role of the auditor, internal controls, and ethical issues are examined. The annual report is used to explore how corporations apply accounting principles in presentations to the public. Prerequisites: minimum of 12 earned credit hours and evidence of successfully meeting the University writing and mathematics proficiency requirements. Cr 3.

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BUS 260 Marketing
7-Week Online (October 27-December 19)
This course is an introduction to the field of marketing. Topics include marketing strategy for products and services, market segmentation, targeting, and positioning, product issues, pricing, promotion, distribution, consumer behavior, marketing research and information systems, international marketing, and nonprofit marketing. Prerequisite: minimum of 24 earned credit hours. Cr 3.

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BUS 275 Applied Business Analysis
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course provides students with an understanding of statistical concepts and tools that are critical in business decision making. The discussion and development of each topic are presented in an application setting, with the statistical results providing insights and solutions to real world problems. The coursework requires extensive use of commercially available statistical software. Prerequisite: ABU 190 (C or higher grade, or test-out option ), MAT 108 (C- or higher grade), and MAT 210 (C- or higher grade) or other approved statistics course (see http://usm.maine.edu/sb/stats for approved courses). Cr 3.

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BUS 280 Legal Environment of Business
7-Week Online (September 2-October 27)
This course introduces students to the legal system, tort law, product liability, consumer law, labor law, equal employment law, intellectual property law, and other topics. It stresses the social responsibility of business and the legal and ethical framework in which businesses must function. Cr 3.

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BUS 340 Managing Organizaitonal Behavior
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
A survey of the disciplines of management and organizational behavior, and of the practices managers employ in planning, organizing, leading, and controlling organizations. Topics include self-awareness, perception and decision making, individual differences and diversity, motivation, group dynamics, communication, stress, power and politics, organizational design, and change. The environmental context, workforce diversity, the global economy, and managerial ethics are core integrating themes. Prerequisite: junior standing. Cr 3.

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BUS 345 Information Technology/MIS
7-Week Online (September 2-October 27)
Surveys information/systems technology for the management of corporate information as a resource. Managerial and technical dimensions of information systems are blended in a framework of information technology. Specific topics will evolve with the field but may include data communications, information systems theory, database concepts, and decision support systems. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Cr 3.

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BUS 370 Management Science
7-Week Online (October 27-December 19)
This course examines the role, perspective, and commonly used tools of quantitative analysis in business decision making. Emphasis is placed upon developing students¿ abilities to recognize the need for quantification; formulate business problems quantitatively; select and test computer-based, decision-support system models; collect meaningful data; and interpret the implications of analysis results. Prerequisites: ABU 190 (C or higher grade, or test-out option), BUS 275 (C- or higher) or MAT 212, and junior standing. Students with credit for BUS 270 or BUS 371 may not enroll. Cr 3.

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BUS 377 Information Visualization
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
In this course, students will learn to create charts, maps, and other visualizations to tell stories and to create effective graphical displays of evidence. Students will learn to critically evaluate examples from print media and the internet after learning the foundations of information visualization. Prerequisites: successful completion of the University¿s Core requirement in quantitative reasoning. Spring only. Cr 3.

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CLA 384 What Would Antigone Do?
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
Exploration of ancient and modern ethical dilemmas via Greek tragedy (in English translation) and ancient and modern responses to it. Readings will be selected from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle, Nietzsche, Martha Nussbaum, and modern dramatists. Prerequisites: ENG 100/101/104 or HON 100 plus one of the following courses in ancient Greek culture: CLA 283, CLA 291, GRE 251, HON 101, HTY 101, HTY 303, PHI 310, or permission of instructor.  Cr. 3.

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CMS 102 Intro to Communication
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course provides students with an overview and brief history of the field of communication, introduces them to theory development and the research process, and illustrates how communication theories can be applied to everyday life. Students will explore communication in a variety of contexts, including intrapersonal, organizational, intercultural, and mass communication. This course satisfies the Socio-Cultural Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.  Cr. 3.

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CMS 103 Intro to Media Studies
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course examines the historical, philosophical, technological, economic, political, and social aspects of print (book, magazine, and newspapers) and electronic media (radio, television, film, sound recordings, and the Internet). In addition, the effects of mass media will be explored.  Cr. 3.

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CMS 150 The Writing Process
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course provides students with professional writing skills through practice in techniques and strategies used in a variety of media writing applications. This course provides students with professional writing skills through practice in techniques and strategies used in a variety of media writing applications. There is a strong emphasis on the utility of writing as a tool of communicating information, interpreting media content, and constructing meaning. Prerequisites: College Writing.  Cr. 3.

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CMS 200 Research Methods in Communication 
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course introduces students to methods of inquiry found in the communication and media studies research literature. These methods include experimental design, survey research, textual analysis, and ethnography. The course examines the underlying philosophical assumptions associated with these methodologies as well as their unique strengths and limitations. Students' conceptual understanding of these methodologies and their ability to become critical consumers of research findings are the major objectives of the course.  CMS 102 and CMS 103. Cr. 3.

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CMS 202 Writing Popular Print Media
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This introduction to magazine writing provides students an opportunity to conceive, craft, and publish original work in different genres for different markets There is a strong emphasis on the utility of writing as a means of organizing and communicating information, as in reporting, and also as a medium for more expressive and entertaining content. Prerequisite: College Writing Cr. 3.

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CMS 265 Interpersonal Communication
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course examines our ability to use what we know and feel in order to send, receive, and store information. Whether stimuli come from an external source or from within the self, the focus of intrapersonal communication is on the ways in which we process those stimuli, our ability to make sense out of our experiences, to remember, to retrieve information from memory, and to create messages at whatever level of consciousness, and no matter how many people are involved, in face-to-face or mediated communication. Prerequisites: CMS 102 and CMS 103. Cr. 3.

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CMS 274 Writing for the Media
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This writing-intensive course is designed to provide students with an overview of media writing. Students will be introduced to radio and television commercial writing, broadcast journalism, and fiction and non-fiction scriptwriting. Prerequisite: College Writing Cr. 3.

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CMS 284 Introduction to Cinema Studies
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course offers an introduction to the analysis of film.  It examines movies from diverse historical periods, nations, and cinematic traditions, including narrative, documentary, and the avant-garde. In addition to providing a foundation in close analysis, the course also introduces students to fundamental issues in film history and film theory.  Prerequisite: College Writing. Cr 3.

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CMS 298 Topics in Communication I:Rhetoric, Media and Culture
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
We live in a media saturated environment that many people take for granted.  However, deeper meanings about society, and our place in it, can be uncovered by examining cultural forms of media and communication more closely.   This course introduces students to ways of understanding media, communication, and culture as processes of language and as rhetoric.  Drawing upon approaches of rhetorical criticism, students learn to make sense of images, symbols, words, texts, and other forms of media and communication that surround us daily.  Key concepts covered include: the rhetoric of everyday life, the significance of signs and symbols, basic rhetorical methods and rhetorical criticism, as well as applications of these concepts to cultural forms such as music, clothing, architecture, food, film, and other texts. Cr 3.

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CMS 330 Interpersonal Communication Theory
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
A study of the current thinking in interpersonal communication which emphasizes specific theories of human interaction. Students will be exposed to research in the interpersonal setting and will apply findings to their personal relationships. The course will help students foster effective traditional and nontraditional relationships with a variety of people. Prerequisite:  CMS 102  Cr. 3.

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CMS 380 Film Genres:Combat War Film
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course will explore a genre found in film history. The genre selected for any given semester could be taken from such established ones as science fiction, horror, screwball comedies, musicals, or film noir. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite College Writing. Cr 3.

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CMS 390 Theories of Organizational Communication
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course is designed to introduce students to organization theory and behavior through the medium of metaphor. Using different metaphors, the course draws attention to significant aspects of the process of organizing, and provides a means for understanding and managing organizational situations. Students are responsible for conducting on-site field studies and preparing written and oral presentations of their findings. Prerequisites: CMS 102 and CMS 103. Cr 3.

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CMS 430 Communication Internship
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
An in-depth experience in specific areas of communication acquired in the field. Students will focus their efforts in an area related to their choice of communication expertise (i.e., organizational communication, mass communication, interpersonal communication). Prerequisites: COM major, junior or senior standing  Pass/fail only. Credit variable (1-15).

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CMS 498 Topics in Communication III:Gender Communication
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
A selection of courses varying in content from term to term. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult MaineStreet for a listing of current topics courses and the CMS homepage for detailed course descriptions. Prerequisites: CMS 102, CMS 103, CMS 200, and junior or senior standing. Cr. 3.

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CON 313 Health in Later Years
7-Week Online (September 2-October 24)
This course is designed for students from diverse fields who are interested in health and aging. The population of older adults in the United States is growing at a rate that is unprecedented in American history and no matter what your career path this growth will impact you. Knowledge about illness, medications, physical activity, nutrition, sexuality, health care delivery, and death and dying will be presented. Students will obtain essential information needed to provide effective care for aging clients, patients, loved ones, and themselves. Community experiences are required. Cr 3.

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CON 318 Adult Development and Aging
7-Week Online (September 2-October 24)
This is an advanced course in developmental psychology focusing on the adult portion of the lifespan. The course will provide an overview of the major theories, issues, and research in the scientific study of adulthood. The interplay of biological and cognitive factors, interpersonal relationships, social structure, and cultural values in shaping the individual's development will be examined.  Prerequisites: College writing and any PSY or SOC course. Cr 3.

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ECO 101 Introduction to Macroeconomics
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
An analysis of the basic characteristics, institutions, and activities of modern market economies. Topics discussed include inflation, unemployment, government monetary and fiscal policy, full employment and economic growth. Prerequisite: none. Every semester. Cr 3.

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ECO 102 Introduction to Microeconomics
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
Introduction to the analysis of individual markets: the functioning of prices in a market economy, economic decision making by producers and consumers, and market structure. Topics discussed include consumer preferences and consumer behavior, production theory and production costs, the monopoly firm, and resource pricing. Additional topics are determined by individual instructors. Prerequisite: none. Every semester. Cr 3.

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ENG 245 Intro to Literary Studies
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This is a required course for all English majors. It may be taken concurrently with other 200-level courses in the Department, but is a prerequisite for all 300- and 400-level courses except those in creative writing. The course will have a double focus. Students will be introduced to a variety of methodologies important to an insightful analysis of literature and other cultural texts. They will also learn research procedures and techniques of effective critical writing. Every semester.  Cr. 3.

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ENG 348 Topics:Interdisciplinary Study:Empire, Ethics & Globalization
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course investigates literature in relation to other disciplines, with an emphasis on how various fields of knowledge contextualize and elucidate our understanding of literary production. Topics may vary and include, for example, anthropology and drama, Freud and literature, literature and technology, and parallel movements in art and/or music and literature. Because of the diverse range of interdisciplinary studies, material is drawn from film, video, music, and art, as well as from printed texts. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Students should consult the Department's Course Guide for detailed descriptions.  Cr.3.

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HTY 101 Western Civilization I
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
A basic survey and introduction to the heritage of Western society from ancient to early-modern times. Particular attention is given to the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Greece and Rome. Medieval civilization is explored with a focus on the institutions it bequeathed to the modern world. The Renaissance and Reformation and the rise of the great nation-states are studied. Throughout the course important individuals are considered such as Alexander the Great, Caesar, Charlemagne, Michelangelo, and Elizabeth I. The course also introduces students to historical method. Every Fall & Spring semester. Cr 3.

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HTY 102 Western Civilization II
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
A basic survey and introduction to the heritage of Western society from early modern times to the atomic age. Particular attention is given to the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the rise of the industrial era, the growth of nationalism, and the World Wars. Personalities such as those of Napoleon, Hitler, and Stalin are studied. The course also introduces students to historical method. Every Fall & Spring semester. Cr 3.

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ITP 340 Fundamentals of Quality
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
An overview addressing fundamental concepts and principles of quality control applied to organizations. Major topics include theory and application of qualitative and quantitative tools and techniques as well as quality awards and standards. Specific topics include foundations of quality, planning tools, traditional tools, variability, process set-up verification, pre-control, SPC process capability analysis, acceptance sampling, and quality awards. Prerequisite: MAT 120 or instructor permission. Offered fall semester only. Cr 3.

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ITP 350 Teambuilding and Facilitation
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
An exploration to the diversity of topics related to team building, group dynamics, and an introduction to the practices and goals of successful facilitation of face-to-face groups and virtual meetings. Teambuilding topics include member and group participant types and functions; stages to teambuilding; creating and building teams; dysfunctions and conflicts within teams and groups, and teams in the roles of content controllers. Facilitation topics include developing techniques and skills in the role of a meeting facilitator and process leader, identifying and defining individual participant behaviors and how those interrelationships affect team dynamics, developing and designing facilitation agendas, preparing and performing facilitations, facilitating conflict, creating participation, and meeting management and ethical responsibilities. Cr. 3

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ITS 320 Occupational Safety & Health
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course covers the importance of safety and health in the workplace. Emphasis will be placed on the worker, his or her work environment including emphasis on OSHA and other regulatory agencies, and address ergonomics, hygiene, hazard identification, machine safeguarding, hazardous waste, loss control, and other areas of major concern.
              
This course includes the online delivery of OSHA¿s 30 hour training program.  Students can select the general industries or the construction OSHA program.  Cr. 3.

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LAC 112 Microsoft Excel
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course uses a problem-solving approach to electronic spreadsheets. It satisfies the LOS major's requirement and should follow the LAC 150 introductory course. Students will learn advanced data analysis, formulas, and create graphs to interpret the data. This course should be completed prior to taking a financial management, economics, or budgeting course. Prerequisite: LAC 150 or equivalent. Cr 1.

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LCC 480 Senior Seminar:Difference
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course provides writing instruction experience for students from LAC's four degree programs. Students complete a major research and writing project addressing one of the four themes of the Common Core from an interdisciplinary approach. Prerequisite: ENG 100C or LCC 110C; LCC 200E or LCC 370E; HUM 300, and LOS 300 OR SBS 320. Cr 3.

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LIN 185 Language, Mind & Society
2 Sections 15-Week Online (September 2-December 19) & 1 Section 7-Week Online (September 2-October 28)
This course approaches language as a biological and psychological phenomenon central to an adequate understanding of human nature. It deals with linguistic questions concerning the grammars of natural languages and how these may vary across cultures and across time, but also with questions about how the human mind and brain both provide for and constrain linguistic ability. The course also addresses questions about how language develops in the child, how it deteriorates under the influence of disease and injury, how it evolved in the history of the species, and what functions it plays in human life. The course does not assume any background in linguistics or foreign languages. Cr 3.

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LOS 250 Organizaitonal Accounting 
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of accounting that they will need to understand financial processes in private, public, and not-for-profit organizations. Cr 3.

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LOS 299 Writing in the Major
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This lab is designed to be taken in conjunction with LOS 300 and is required of all LOS majors. Cr 1.

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LOS 300 Organizational Theory
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This is a foundational course that provides a solid overview of organizational theories in leadership. Current organizational issues are analyzed using structural, human resource, cultural, and political frameworks and the case method. Issues examined include leadership, organizational design, planning, change, decision making, communication, and control. This is an excellent course for students interested in how organizations work.
Students in the LOS major must complete this required course with a grade of a B- or better as a condition of their degree. This course includes writing instruction. Prerequisite: familiarity with the Blackboard online learning community. Completion of College Writing with a C or better is required for LOS majors and preferred for all other students. Cr 3.

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LOS 302 Organizational Behavior
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course examines human behavior in organizations: individual, group, and organizational processes that impact workplace behaviors and organizational life. The focus is on understanding factors that contribute to organizational effectiveness and the major challenges facing organizations today. We will cover topics such as individual and organizational learning, individual values and motivation; interpersonal communication and work team dynamics, leadership and emotional intelligence, power and influence, organizational culture and change. Students will engage in experiential and skill-building activities and apply conceptual frameworks to their real-life work experiences. Cr. 3

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LOS 308 Lean Methods & Systems
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This is an introductory course in applying lean principles and methods in organizations, including front/back office manufacturing, non-profits, healthcare, IT, education, and government.  Students will learn basic lean principles and methods and have an opportunity to observe, practice, and apply principles and methods learned. Cr. 3

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LOS 312 Human Resource Management
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course focuses on the procedures and processes associated with the management of human resources within organizations. Topics include recruitment, staff development, job analysis, personnel systems, and training. Cr 3.

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LOS 323 The Media and Politics
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course explores the implications of political campaigns in American politics. Topics include management of campaigns, candidate recruitment, positive and negative advertising, political consultants, political parties and interest groups, effects of media coverage, campaign financing, and impact of campaigns and elections on public policy. Special consideration will be given to current campaigns. Cr 3.

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LOS 329 Research Methods
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course is an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods which can be used in organizational planning and decision making and in the social and behavioral sciences. The course will cover topic areas related to the application of appropriate methods of inquiry and includes completion of an applied project. Strongly recommended for students going on to graduate school, careers in consulting, or human resource management. Prerequisite: LCC 150 or equivalent. Cr 3.

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LOS 333 Portfolio Development
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This Portfolio Development course is offered to the adult learner who is preparing a competency based, experiential, academic portfolio, documenting their college-level knowledge, competencies, and abilities. This course supports students in improving the skills and knowledge needed to document and communicate their prior learning in the area of leadership and organizational studies. At the end of the course, students submit a completed academic portfolio for assessment to USM¿s Office of Prior Learning for possible additional credits. Prerequisites:  College writing or the equivalent, leadership LOS 350 either concurrently or completed, resume submission, and subsequent permission by instructor. Cr 3.

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LOS 350 Leadership
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This foundational course for students of leadership will provide learners with a review of major leadership concepts and theories designed to incorporate  research findings, practice, skill-building, and direct application to real world scenarios. Beyond leadership concepts and theories, the course will cover a variety of topics impacting today's leaders as a foundation for learning including power and ethics, leadership development, politics and influence, decision making, and creativity and innovation. An experiential design is used along with traditional online techniques to help students reflect on their personal leadership styles and examine their approaches to leading others in diverse organizational settings. Students in the LOS major must complete this required course with a grade of a B- or better as a condition of their degree. Completion of College Writing with a C or better is required for LOS majors and preferred for all other students. Cr 3.

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LOS 369 Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles
7-Week Online (September 2-October 24)
In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5.

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LOS 413 Job Search Skills in the 21st Century
7-Week Online (October 27-December 12)
In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5.

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LOS 440 Organizational Change and Development 
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course explores the theory, research, and processes of leading, managing, and adapting to organizational change. Case studies and experiential learning are used to examine the effectiveness of change efforts and their impact on the group and individual. Cr 3.

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LOS 447 Internship
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3-6.

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LSH 240 Introducing the Humanities
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course examines the origins, development, and future of the humanities through the texts and methods of the following disciplines: classics, history, literary studies, philosophy, religion and the Arts. Prerequisites: EYE and College Writing Cr 3.

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LSH 340 Topics in the Humanities:Rhetoric, Media & Culture
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
We live in a media saturated environment that many people take for granted.  However, deeper meanings about society, and our place in it, can be uncovered by examining cultural forms of media and communication more closely.   This course introduces students to ways of understanding media, communication, and culture as processes of language and as rhetoric.  Drawing upon approaches of rhetorical criticism, students learn to make sense of images, symbols, words, texts, and other forms of media and communication that surround us daily.  Key concepts covered include: the rhetoric of everyday life, the significance of signs and symbols, basic rhetorical methods and rhetorical criticism, as well as applications of these concepts to cultural forms such as music, clothing, architecture, food, film, and other texts. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.

 

LSH 340 Topics in the Humanities:Genocide in Our Time
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course will analyze the nature of evil/genocide by examining examples of governmentally or ideologically initiated murder. It will seek to understand the historical background and reality of victim, bystander, and victimizer. It will use a number of approaches , namely psychological, philosophical, religious, sociological, and political to help our understanding. Cr 3.

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LSH 340 Topics in the Humanities:Discourses of Self-Determination
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course investigates the emergence of new forms of self-determinative writing in the 18th century autobiography, the travel journal and the Bildungsroman (novel of self-development). Many of these discourses of self-determination were used by people who also influenced the social history of the period: Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Mary Wollstonecraft, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Thomas Jefferson. Their self expressions will be read in conjunction with important social discourses of self-determination these writers produced: Rousseau's Social Contract, Mary Wollstonecraft's  Vindication of the Rights of Women, and Thomas Jefferson's  Declaration of Independence.  We will also explore how early narratives of self-determination like The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano or Gustavus Vassa, the African open up the possibility for later emancipatory writing reflected in autobiographies like that of Frederick Douglass and Malcolm X.  Ultimately, the course will explore how discourses of self-determination draw on one another and pave the way not only for the possibility of the democratic individualism we value, but also the evolution toward what our constitutional founders called a 'more perfect union' in American socio/political life. Cr 3.

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MAT 120 Intro to Statistics
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
An introduction to probability and statistics through lecture and lab. Particular topics include random variables and their distributions, methods of descriptive statistics, estimation and hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation. Prerequisite: successful completion of the University's college readiness requirement in mathematics. Cr 4.

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MAT 210 Business Statistics
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
This course investigates graphical and numerical methods of descriptive statistics; basic probability; discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions (binomial, hypergeometric, Poisson, uniform, exponential, and normal); sampling distributions; estimation; tests of hypotheses; and other selected topics. Applications will be chosen primarily from business. Prerequisite: MAT 108 (may be taken concurrently). Cr 4.

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MUS 100 Music Appreciation and History
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
A survey of music from the Gregorian chant to the modern times, covering musical practices of the renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary periods. Representative works by the outstanding composers of each period. Open to all students. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.

 

PHI 107 Intro:World Philosophy
7-Week Online (September 2-October 24)
This course presents the world views of philosophers from ancient to contemporary times. The thinkers will be chosen from a broad range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Emphasis will be placed on the wide diversity and historical background of philosophical positions.  Prerequisite: a college writing course. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.

 

PHI 205 Symbolic Logic
15-Week Online (September 2-December 19)
Techniques of modern deductive logic; properties of formal systems; logical implications and paradoxes of language. Prerequisite: PHI 100-level or EYE course. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.

 

PHI 220 Philosophy of Art
7-Week Online (September 2-October 24)
What makes a person creative? What do artists think about their art? How do critics evaluate a work? If art is created for a cultural ritual or healing, is it to be understood differently? How do the circumstances of a work's creation and reception influence its evaluation? How do a person's class, ethnicity, and gender influence the artwork and its reception. Philosophers in the field of Aesthetics attempt to answer questions which artists, art historians, anthropologists, and critics ask about art. The works of art and philosophy considered will be drawn from a wide variety of cultural contexts. Prerequisite: PHI 100-level or EYE course. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.

 

PHI 295 Medicine, Madness, and Disease
2 Sections, 7-Week Online (September 2-October 24) & 7-Week Online (October 27-December 19)
Recent advances in modern medicine and medical technology challenge traditional notions of health, sanity, and the social order. The course will examine some of the controversial ethical dilemmas that patients, families, and health care providers confront, such as informed consent, truth-telling, prenatal screening, abortion, involuntary commitment for the mentally ill, drug testing, and patient rights.  Prerequisite: PHI 100-level or EYE course. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.

 

STH 300 Partnering with Family Caregivers
7-Week Online (October 27-December 19)
Connecting with family caregivers is crucial for the delivery of a successful care plan. This course explores how providers can address the psychosocial challenges of caring for an aging family member. Family caregivers are responsible for providing the majority of long term care for people who are living with chronic illness and progressive dementia. We will examine the challenges that impact caregiving including physical, emotional and spiritual strain, and how health care providers and social service professionals can provide information, resources and support that will lead to sustainable outcomes for both the caregiver and the care recipient. It is recommended that the students have junior/senior status, have a college writing course and at least one course in either psychology or sociology.  Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.