Psychology

Course Descriptions

PSY 101 General Psychology I
An introduction to the study of behavior as a natural science. Among the topics covered are: method of inquiry, physiological foundations of behavior, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, learning and thinking. This course is a prerequisite for all courses in the Department. Cr. 3.

PSY 102 General Psychology II
A continuation of Psychology 101. It deals with complex psychological processes such as ability testing, personality, conflict, behavior disorders and therapy, and social and industrial behavior. Prerequisite: PSY 101 with a grade of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 105 Statistics in Psychology
A general introduction to the techniques of descriptive, predictive, and inferential statistics. Emphasis is placed on measures of central tendency and variability, correlation, hypothesis testing, and simple analysis of variance. Prerequisite: successful completion of the University's mathematics college readiness requirement. Cr 3.

PSY 205 Experimental Methodology
Emphasis on the principles, methods, and techniques of experimental psychology. Applications of general methodology and specific techniques to the design of experiments in behavioral research. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PSY 101 and PSY 105 with grades of C- or better; corequisite PSY 206. Cr 3.

PSY 206 Methodology Lab
This course applies the scientific method to selected areas of experimental psychology. Such areas may include animal learning, physiological, sensation-perception, cognition, social-personality, and developmental psychology. Report writing and interpretation of statistical results will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PSY 101 and 105 with grades of C- or better; corequisite: PSY 205. Cr 1.

PSY 210 Popular Psychology
This course develops students' skills of critical analysis and interpretation through an examination of popular versions of psychology. Students also explore social and cultural influences on popular forms of psychology in different historical periods. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 with a grade of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 220 Psychology of the Lifespan
This is a broad introductory course focusing on the theories, research methods, and the status of scientific knowledge about human development across the lifespan. The course focuses on the interplay of psychological and environmental factors in physical, cognitive, social, and personality development from birth through adulthood. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 and 102 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 230 Social Psychology
The psychological principles that enter into the social behavior of the individual. Areas of consideration include perception, communication, attitude formation, interpersonal attraction, and group behavior. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 with a grade of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 232 Psychology of Adjustment
A study of the development of personality patterns, modes of behavior, life styles, and coping mechanisms considered normal in this society. Consideration of their value to individual functioning. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 and 102 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 233 Psychopathology
The etiology, development, and manifestation of the major forms of mental illness with particular emphasis upon the neuroses and psychoses. Psychological, social, and biological factors that contribute to maladjustment are examined. Credit may not be earned for both SBS 303 and PSY 233. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 and 102 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 235 Psychology of Women
Psychology of women and psychological literature relevant to men and women. Some topics include physiological and personality differences between the sexes, sex-role development, role conflict, women and traditional therapy. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 and 102 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 323 Psychology of Infancy and Childhood
This is an advanced course where students with a solid background in developmental psychology will explore in detail the psychological issues and events that occur during the course of infancy and childhood. Current research focusing on the interplay of psychological and environmental factors in physical, cognitive, social, and personality development of individuals from conception to puberty will be explored. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101, and either PSY 220 or HRD/SBS 200 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 324 Psychology of Adolescence
This advanced course will provide an overview of theories, issues, and research in the study of human development from early adolescence to early adulthood. The interplay of biological and cognitive factors, interpersonal relationships, social structure, and cultural values in shaping the individual's development will be examined. The role of adolescence in both the individual's life course and evolution of the culture as a whole will be considered. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101, and either PSY 220 or HRD/SBS 200 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 325 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging
This is an advanced course in developmental psychology focusing on the adult portion of the lifespan. The course will provide an overview of the major theories, issues, and research in the scientific study of adulthood. The interplay of biological and cognitive factors, interpersonal relationships, social structure, and cultural values in shaping the individual's development will be examined. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101, and either PSY 220 or HRD/SBS 200 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 326 Psychology of Social and Linguistic Development
This seminar explores research addressing infant and child social and linguistic development. The main focus is on brain development, temperament, attachment, linguistic growth, and early social cognition as the basis for children's emergent social and communicative competence. Students are expected to contribute to discussion and debates each week. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101, and either PSY 220 or HRD/SBS 200 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 338 Theories of Personality
A survey of the major contemporary approaches to the study of personality. Different theories are compared, their impact upon current thinking evaluated, and their research contributions assessed. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 with a grade of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 340 Behavior Modification
An introduction to the principles of operant conditioning with emphasis on the application of operant techniques in educational, correctional, and therapeutic situations. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 with a grade of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 350 Psychology of Learning
Experimental findings on the fundamental principles that underlie the acquisition and retention of new behavior. Emphasis is placed on operant and respondent conditioning and the experimental analysis of behavior. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 and 102 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 360 Cognitive Processes
A review of contemporary experimental and theoretical work on human information processing. Topics include pattern recognition, memory, attention, decision making, language, problem solving, and creativity. Emphasis will be placed on research methodology and on the interpretation of experimental findings. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 with a grade of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 361 Sensation and Perception
An examination of perceptual processes and sensory systems. Emphasis is on experimental methodology, research findings, and theoretical interpretations. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 with a grade of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 365 Physiological Psychology
Basic neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and endocrinology, and the relationships between nervous system functioning and behavior. Physiological analysis of sensory function, motivation, and learning. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101,102, and BIO 111 with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 366 Drugs, Mind, and Behavior
The physiological and behavioral effects of drugs are examined in light of current research. Also considered are theories relating to the use/abuse of drugs, tolerance, addiction, and drug interactions. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 and one semester of biology with grades of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 368 Health Psychology
This course is designed to introduce the student to the discipline of health psychology from a bio-psychosocial perspective. An integrative approach will be provided via discussion of the biological and psycho-physiological foundations of health and disease, including the topics of stress and coping, prevention, diet, substance abuse, and chronic illness. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 with grade of C- or better. Cr 3.

PSY 371 History and Systems of Psychology
A survey of the history of psychological thought from its beginnings in Greek philosophy to modern times. Special attention will be given to the influence of philosophy and natural science on the development of contemporary psychology. The course concludes with a survey of the major systems. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PSY 101 and 102 with grades of C- or better. This course will satisfy the intensive writing requirement. Cr 3.

PSY 380 Psychology and the Law
This course represents an intensive study of the role of psychology in the legal process with particular emphasis upon the insanity defense, competency to stand trial, and involuntary commitments. Also considered are those psychological factors that relate to such topics as jury selection and deliberation, eyewitness testimony and credibility, and courtroom strategy. A term paper is required of all students. Prerequisites: PSY 101, 102, 233 and/or permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

PSY 400 Independent Research
This course provides junior and senior psychology majors the opportunity to pursue guided reading/research on a topic of their choosing. Each independent study project will be conducted with advice and guidance from the sponsoring faculty member. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, successful completion (with grades of C- or better) of PSY 205 and PSY 206, completion of independent study application describing the proposed reading/research project, permission of faculty sponsor. Cr 1-3.

PSY 401 Research Apprenticeship
This course provides junior and senior psychology majors the opportunity to develop further insight into the research process through direct involvement with ongoing faculty research. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, successful completion (with grades of C- or better) of PSY 205 and PSY 206, completion of independent study application describing the reading/research project and tasks or activities they will be performing, permission of faculty sponsor. Cr 1-3.

PSY 405 Teaching Apprenticeship
This course provides psychology majors the opportunity to assist teaching faculty and to develop deeper understanding of course materials and college teaching. Teaching apprentices are selected by faculty. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, completion of independent study application describing their relevant course experiences and tasks/activities they will be performing, permission of faculty sponsor. Cr 1-3.

PSY 410 Internship/Field Experience
This course provides junior and senior psychology majors the opportunity to apply their psychology training in organizations and community service projects. Currently students may participate in the USM-Hall School Mentor project. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, completion of application describing the tasks or activities they will be performing, permission of faculty sponsor and department chair. Cr 1-3.