Research

Is Mining a Closed Landfill Economically Feasible?

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Travis Wagner, an Associate Professor of Environmental Science & Policy, is currently working on a case study examining North America's first successful mining operation of a closed landfill. The mining operation is recovering post-burn ferrous and non-ferrous metals from landfills owned by Ecomaine, located in South Portland and Scarborough, ME. He is analyzing the collected data to determine the market value of the recovered metals.  His goal is to address under which conditions the mining of a landfill can be technologically and economically successful. Although a local project, it has generated a lot of international interest because of the US past history of disposing high value materials.  Dr. Wagner also serves as a member of the Ecomaine Recycling Committee.

Research Mission

To support research, scholarship and creative activity to: promote knowledge, discovery and practical application to advance Maine's economy, communities and the quality of life for Maine citizens; to strengthen classroom education and transform the lives of students through real world learning opportunities; and to support faculty and staff commitment to excellence in scholarly accomplishments regionally, nationally and internationally.