Stonecoast MFA in Creative Writing

Poetry Faculty

Facult List

Jeanne Marie Beaumont won the National Poetry Series for her first book, Placebo Effects, selected by William Matthews and published by W.W. Norton in 1997. Her other collections of poems are Curious Conduct and Burning of the Three Fires, both from BOA Editions. With Claudia Carlson, she co-edited the anthology The Poets’ Grimm: Twentieth Century Poems from Grimm Fairy Tales (Story Line Press, 2003). She has been awarded the Dana Award for Poetry and the Greensboro ReviewPrize, and from 1992 to 2000, she coedited  the literary magazine American Letters & Commentary. Jeannie earned an MFA from Columbia University and has taught at Rutgers University and at The Frost Place, where she served as director of the Frost Place Seminar from 2007-2010. She also teaches at The Unterberg Poetry Center of the 92nd Street Y in New York City.

Ted Deppe was born in Duluth, Minnesota, and presently lives in County Galway, Ireland. He is the author of four books of poetry: Children of the Air(Alice James Books, 1990), The Wanderer King (Alice James, 1996), Cape Clear: New and Selected Poems (Salmon Books, Ireland, 2002), and Orpheus on the Red Line (Tupelo Press, 2009). His poetry has been published widely on both sides of the Atlantic, and his work has been recognized by a Pushcart Prize, two NEA grants, and fellowships from the Massachusetts Cultural Commission and the Connecticut Council on the Arts. He has been writer in residence at the James Merrill House in Stonington, CT, the Poets’ House in Donegal, Ireland, and Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts. Ted is the coordinator of the Stonecoast in Ireland program.

Martín Espada called “the Latino poet of his generation,” Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than fifteen books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His latest collection of poems, The Trouble Ball (Norton, 2011), is the recipient of the Milt Kessler Award, a Massachusetts Book Award and an International Latino Book Award. The Republic of Poetry (Norton, 2006) received the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A previous book of poems, Imagine the Angels of Bread (Norton, 1996), won an American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other poetry collections include A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (Norton, 2000), City of Coughing and Dead Radiators (Norton, 1993), and Rebellion is the Circle of a Lover’s Hands (Curbstone, 1990).  He has received other recognition such as the Shelley Memorial Award from the Poetry Society of America, the Robert Creeley Award, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.  His work has been widely translated; collections of poems have been published in Spain, Puerto Rico and Chile. His book of essays, Zapata’s Disciple (South End Press, 1998), has been banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona. A graduate of Northeastern University Law School and a former tenant lawyer, Espada is currently a professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Debra Marquart is a professor of English in the MFA Program in Creative Writing and Environment at Iowa State University. In addition, her books include two poetry collections, From Sweetness (Pearl Editions, 2002) andEverything’s a Verb (New Rivers Press, 1995), and a short story collection, The Hunger Bone: Rock & Roll Stories (New Rivers Press, 2001) which draws on her experiences as a road musician. Marquart is a member of The Bone People, a jazz-poetry, rhythm & blues project, with whom she has released two CDs: Orange Parade and A Regular Dervish. Marquart’s memoir, The Horizontal World: Growing Up Wild in the Middle of Nowhere (Counterpoint Books, 2006) was awarded the 2007 PEN USA Creative Nonfiction Award. Deb's work has also received a Pushcart Prize, the Shelby Foote Nonfiction Prize from the Faulkner Society, the Headwaters Prize, the Minnesota Voices Award from New Rivers Press, the Elle Lettres Award from Elle Magazine, the Mid-American Review Nonfiction Award, the John Guyon Nonfiction Award from Crab Orchard Review, and a National Endowment for the Arts Prose Fellowship. Deb is at work on two books: a novel, set in Greece, titled Among the Ruins; and a roots/travel memoir about her grandparents’ flight from Russia, titled Somewhere Else This Time Tomorrow.

Stephen Motika was born in Santa Monica, California. His first book of poems, Western Practice, was published by Alice James Books in April 2012. He is also the author of two chapbooks, Arrival and at Mono (2007) and In the Madrones (2011), and the editor of Tiresias: The Collected Poems of Leland Hickman (2009). His articles and poems have appeared in At Length, Another Chicago Magazine, BOMB, The Brooklyn Review, Eleven Eleven, Omniverse, The Poetry Project Newsletter, and Poets.org. He has been a resident at the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and the Millay Colony for the Arts. The program director at Poets House and the publisher of Nightboat Books, he lives in Brooklyn and Mileses, New York.

David Mura is a creative nonfiction writer, poet, fiction writer, critic, playwright and performance artist.  Mura has written two memoirs: Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei (Grove-Atlantic), which won a 1991 Josephine Miles Book Award from the Oakland PEN and was listed in the New York Times Notable Books of Year, and Where the Body Meets Memory: An Odyssey of Race, Sexuality and Identity (Anchor).   His three books of poetry are Angels for the Burning (Boa), The Colors of Desire (Anchor, Carl Sandburg Literary Award), and, After We Lost Our Way (Carnegie Mellon), which won the 1989 National Poetry Series Contest.  His book of critical essays is Song for Uncle Tom, Tonto & Mr. Moto: Poetry & Identity (U. of Michigan Press).  His novel, Famous Suicides of the Japanese Empire, a finalist for the Minnesota Book Award, the John Gardner Fiction Prize and Virginia Commonwealth University Cabell First Novelist Award, was published in Sept. 2008 from Coffee House Press.  Mura's essays on race and multiculturalism have appeared in Mother Jones and The New York Times.  His plays include Secret Colors (with novelist Alexs Pate),The Winged Seed, adapted from Li-Young Lee's memoir, and After Hours (with actor Kelvin Han Yee and pianist Jon Jang).

Alexs Pate is the author of five novels including the New York Times Bestseller Amistad, commissioned by Steven Spielberg’s Dreamworks/SKG and based on the screenplay by David Franzoni. Other novels include Losing Absalom, Finding MakebaThe Multicultiboho Sideshow and West of Rehoboth, which was selected as “Honor Fiction Book” for 2002 by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association. Alexs’s first book of nonfiction, In The Heart of the Beat: The Poetry of Rap was published by Scarecrow Press January 2010. His memoir, The Past is Perfect: Memoir of a Father/Son Reunion will be published next year by Coffee House Press. An excerpt of the memoir appears in the Fall 2007 edition of Black Renaissance Noire. Alexs’s poetry collection,Innocent, was published in 1998. Alexs is an Assistant Professor in African American and African Studies at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches courses in writing and black literature, including a course on “The Poetry of Rap.” He is currently at work on two novels,The Slide and a story about a black pirate captain, Adventures of the Black Arrow: Search for Libertalia.

Eléna Rivera was born in Mexico City and spent her childhood in Paris. She is the author of The Perforated Map (Shearsman Books, 2011), Remembrance of Things Plastic (LRL e-editions 2010), Mistakes, Accidents and the Want of Liberty (Barque Press, 2006), and Suggestions at Every Turn (Seeing Eye Books, 2005). Her poems have appeared in The Nation, Drunken Boat, H_NGM_N, Zoland Poetry, Esopus, Aufgabe, Tarpaulin Sky, among others. Her chapbook On the Nature of Position and Tone is now available from Fields Press (2012). Eléna won the 2010 Robert Fagles prize in translation for her translation of The Rest of the Voyage by Bernard Noël, published by Graywolf Press in November 2011. She was also awarded a 2010 National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship in Translation, and a 2009 Fundacíon Valparaíso Poetry Residency in Mojácar, Spain. She was the recipient of the 2007 Witter Bynner Poetry Translator Residency at the Santa Fe Art Institute, and received a poetry fellowship from the MacDowell Colony. She teaches in the McGhee Division at New York University, at Bard College, for Poets & Writers, and recently taught a workshop on “Memory, Image and the Poem” at Poets House.

Timothy Seibles is the author of five books of poetry:Body Moves, Hurdy-Gurdy, Kerosene, Ten Miles an Hour, and Hammerlock.  His work has been featured in Red Brick Review, New Letters, Dark Eros, Ploughshares, New England Review, The Artful Dodge and the anthology In Search of Color Everywhere,and he is the recipient of a fellowship from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, Massachusetts. Born in Philadelphia, he earned a BA from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, and an M.F.A. from Vermont College. He taught high school English for ten years and worked as Writing Coordinator of the Fine Arts Work Center. He has taught at Cave Canem and is Associate Professor of English at Old Dominion University.