USM Winter

Browse Winter Courses

There are 2 ways to view USM Winter courses:

Before you search courses, please be aware of the following:

  • Payment is due within ten days of registration.
  • Students can take a maximum of 4.5 credits.
  • Winter Session is December 15th-January 9th. There is an overlap with Fall semester finals at USM.  Please plan accordingly.

1. USM MaineStreet Class Search, which will provide course availability and class information. View the YouTube video below for a quick tutorial on how to use our Class Search.

course search video

Not sure which course to take? Connect with an Enrollment Counselor today! 

2. For your convenience, an interactive course listing that provides faculty contact information and course description. 

 

ABU 190 Spreadsheet & Problem Solving
Alice B Cash
An examination of problem-solving techniques using modern computer applications software. Primary focus is on the use of electronic spreadsheets as a problem-solving tool, including proper spreadsheet model design and the use of appropriate graphical representation of model results. Other computer problem-solving software is examined. Interpretation and effective communication of results, both written and oral, are practiced. Prerequisite: MAT 101 or equivalent proficiency and computer literacy. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.

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ANT 101 Anthropology: The Cultural View
Kreg T Ettenger
This course is a basic introductory survey of cultural anthropology. It examines the differences between cultures as well as cultural universals, and the relationship between social organization, ideology, economics, and political structure in different types of societies. It reviews the various theoretical approaches in cultural anthropology's attempt to explain human behavior, presenting examples from foraging, farming, and contemporary industrial societies through readings and films.  Cr.3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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BUS 313 Sport Facility Management
Joanne Williams
An investigation of the functions of sport managers in the design, operation, and financing of facilities and venues. Students will examine the issues pertaining to management of public and private arenas, stadiums, theatres, galleries, festivals, racetracks, and multipurpose facilities. Management of temporary facilities for special events will also be considered. Prerequisite: BUS 311 or BUS 315. Cr 3. 

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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BUS 335 International Business
Robert S Heiser
Introduction to the global economy and the political and cultural environments of international business. Topics include financial, marketing, and human resource issues in international business. Prerequisites: ECO 101, ECO 102, and junior standing. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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CMS 200 Research Methods in Communication
Leonard J Shedletsky
This course introduces students to methods of inquiry found in the communication and media studies research literature. These methods include experimental design, survey research, textual analysis, and ethnography. The course examines the underlying philosophical assumptions associated with these methodologies as well as their unique strengths and limitations. Students' conceptual understanding of these methodologies and their ability to become critical consumers of research findings are the major objectives of the course.  CMS 102 and CMS 103. Cr. 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search.

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CMS 205 Topics in Media Writing I: Writing the Personal Essay
Dennis C Gilbert
Writing the Personal Essay is an immersion into one of the most popular genres of contemporary non-fiction. This unique blend of biography and autobiography invites you to develop a narrative based on personal experience and intentional observation into a publishable, feature-length essay.  Course work also includes an abridged Intro-To-Lit-type survey of some of the masterworks of the genre.  Writing assignments are sequential, building from proficiency in the fundamentals toward each writer's signature of voice and style.

My personal goals for this course are that you have the opportunity to experience expressive writing as a transformative experience; that you develop an appreciation for self-reflection as a habit of mind made more valuable when matched with close observation of the world; that you are reminded, through your own practice, that good writing relies on good craftsmanship and design; and that you develop the confidence and skills to communicate effectively and persuasively from an informed point of view.

Prerequisites: College Writing Cr. 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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CMS 298 Topics in Communication I: Communication and Social Media
Maureen Ebben
Social media have created a highly networked and connected public culture.  This topics course in communication and media studies explores the ways in which social media have influenced and altered patterns of human communication and interaction.  Topics covered in the course include interpersonal communication dynamics in social media, privacy (or the lack thereof) in social media, social media and identity, networked friendships and relationships, and communication and information security in the digital age. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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CMS 345 Small Group Communication
Russell J Kivatisky
This course is designed to familiarize students with the theories and techniques associated with group behavior. The course explores the topics of leadership, conflict resolution, group climate, and decision making. Through simulations and exercises students learn methods for analyzing group process and their own behavior. Students' findings are reported in preliminary and final papers. Prerequisites:  CMS 102 Cr. 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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CON 219 Lifetime Physical Fitness & Wellness
Alicia C Trott
The primary emphasis of this course is to teach students how to take control of their personal health and lifestyle habits. Major areas will include nutrition/weight management, fitness training techniques, flexibility, coronary risk factor management, muscular strength/endurance, stress management, and other wellness-related topics. Class content will include readings, discussions, self-assessment activities, and development of personalized nutrition and physical activity plans. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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COR 301 Thoughtful Giving: Philanthropy 
Adam M Tuchinsky
Thoughtful Giving: Philanthropy and American Culture is an interdisciplinary course in the humanities with a community-based focus.  It satisfies the Ethical Inquiry, Social Responsibility, and Citizenship general education requirement.   

The course has two basic parts.  In the traditional academic part, students will read and discuss various texts that address the issue and theme of philanthropy and giving.  The course also requires students to complete 20 hours of volunteer work and to complete a research paper based upon the experience. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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CRM 100 Introduction to Criminology
Dusan I Bjelic
This course focuses on the nature of crime and on problems concerning its measurement and distribution. The course examines some of the popular images of crime in the media and elsewhere, the creation and utility of official and unofficial crime statistics, and theories about the causes of crime. No prerequisites. A grade of C or better is required in this course in order to continue in the major. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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ECO 120 Lying with Graphs: Reading, Writing and Interpreting Graphs in the Social Sciences
Rachel Bouvier
If a picture's worth a thousand words, a graph's worth a thousand numbers. Graphs can be used to explain, present, and--yes--distort information. During this course, you will learn how to correctly interpret, critique, and construct graphs, as well as avoid the pitfalls often encountered in using graphs to communicate. Prerequisite: Students must meet college readiness in mathematics prior to enrollment. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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GEY 100 Volcanoes, Earthquakes & Plates
Mark T Swanson
An introduction to minerals, rocks, and the processes that have continually shaped the earth over hundreds of millions of years of geologic history. The course also explores how the movements of crustal plates generates earthquakes, volcanoes, continental rifting, sea floor spreading, subduction, and continental-scale mountain ranges. For core science course credit, registration in one of the following: GEY 101 or GEY 106 is required; concurrent registration is recommended. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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GEY 101 Lab Experiences in Geology
Mark T Swanson
Weekly lab sessions will focus on the basic skills of mineral identification, rock classification, and interpretation of topographic and geologic maps. Field trips to local geologic sites of interest will help illustrate rock types and geologic processes that shape our world. Traditional map, compass, and modern GPS techniques will be utilized. For core science course credit, registration in one of the following: GEY 100, GEY 103, or GEY 105 is required; concurrent registration is recommended. Cr 1.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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HRD 200 Multicultural Human Development
Julie A Zink
This course introduces developmental theory and research that encompasses the entire lifespan. Emphasis will be on prenatal development through adolescence, with an overview of adult development. A multi-disciplinary and multicultural view of human development will be taken by examining theories from a socio-cultural context and in consideration of change as well as stability throughout the life cycle. The interaction of hereditary, environmental, and socio-cultural factors will be considered in studying physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development. Prerequisite:  Second semester freshmen or above; must have completed College Writing and an EYE course. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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LSH 340 Topics in the Humanities: Communication & Social Media
Maureen Ebben
Social media have created a highly networked and connected public culture.  This topics course in communication and media studies explores the ways in which social media have influenced and altered patterns of human communication and interaction.  Topics covered in the course include interpersonal communication dynamics in social media, privacy (or the lack thereof) in social media, social media and identity, networked friendships and relationships, and communication and information security in the digital age. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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MAT 120 Introduction to Statistics
Staff
An introduction to probability and statistics through lecture and lab. Particular topics include random variables and their distributions, methods of descriptive statistics, estimation and hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation. Prerequisite: successful completion of the University's college readiness requirement in mathematics. Cr 4.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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MUS 100 Music Appreciation and History
Michele E Kaschub
A survey of music from the Gregorian chant to the modern times, covering musical practices of the renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary periods. Representative works by the outstanding composers of each period. Open to all students. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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MUS 103 Introduction to Jazz
Christopher W Oberholtzer
A survey of jazz from its inception to the present day. Involves a study of the origins and stylistic development of jazz. Open to all students. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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MUS 110 Fundamentals of Music
Thomas M Parchman
A background study of concepts and skills essential to an intelligent reading of music. The development of natural music abilities through participating in singing, rhythmic activities, and instrumental work. An appreciation of music through awareness of basic structures. Open to all students. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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PHI 107 Intro: World Philosophy
Derek A Michaud
This course presents the world views of philosophers from ancient to contemporary times. The thinkers will be chosen from a broad range of cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Emphasis will be placed on the wide diversity and historical background of philosophical positions.  Prerequisite: a college writing course. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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PHI 211 Media Ethics
Julien S Murphy
In the information age, media play an increasingly large role in our lives. Our notion of living in a global society is largely shaped by media. What is responsible journalism? Does violent programming contribute to violence in America? What are professional ethics and how should they guide media practitioners? We will discuss these questions by examining key ethical values in media such as: privacy, confidentiality, truth telling, conflicts of interest, and social responsibility. We will also explore some fundamental issues in ethical theory such as: Why be ethical? What is ethics? How do ethical theories differ? What are the best ways to evaluate and apply ethical theories to media controversies today? The course is designed for majors in philosophy, media studies, and communication as well as other interested students. Prerequisite:  PHI 100-level or EYE course.  Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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PHI 312 Morality in African Literature and Film
Kathleen J Wininger
Intellectual, cinematic and literary movements will be examined through generations of thinkers in African national, cultural and geographical settings. The course will look at texts from West, East, and Southern Africa dealing with theory, fiction, and visual culture. Important recent controversies in gender and postcolonial philosophy are explored.  Prerequisites: Any 100-level course. Cr. 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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PSY 101 General Psychology I
John P Broida
An introduction to the study of behavior as a natural science. Among the topics covered are: method of inquiry, physiological foundations of behavior, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, learning and thinking. This course is a prerequisite for all courses in the Department. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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PSY 220 Psychology of the Lifespan
Robert B Thompson
This is a broad introductory course focusing on the theories, research methods, and the status of scientific knowledge about human development across the lifespan. The course focuses on the interplay of psychological and environmental factors in physical, cognitive, social, and personality development from birth through adulthood. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PSY 101 and 102 with grades of C- or better.  Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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RHF 118 Yoga
Amanda D Curtis Kezal
RHF courses are designed to provide education and skill development in a particular recreation or health/fitness activity. Because skill and/or fitness development are objectives in all RHF courses, students must attend and participate in class activities in order to pass. The Department reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation in courses that require high intensity exercise. An * after a course number indicates  that students will be required to pay a vendor charge for access to activity environments and/or equipment. The course instructor will explain any charge. The following are the RHF activity areas: RHF 101 Tennis; RHF 106 Ballroom Dance; RHF 107 Aerobics; RHF 108 Step Aerobics; RHF 109 Beginning Weight Training; RHF 114* Rock Climbing; RHF 117 Low Impact Aerobics; RHF 118 Yoga; RHF 121 Self-Defense; RHF 122 Aerobic Kickboxing; RHF 123* Introduction to Sea Kayaking; RHF 124 T'ai Chi Qigong; RHF 125* Introduction to Cross-Country Skiing; RHF 126 Stability and Physio-Ball Exercise; and RHF 127 Pilates. Cr 1.5.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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SOC 150 Social Networks & Value Drivers
Ed Collom
Examines social networks and the causes, qualities, and consequences of those ties connecting us together.  Students will be introduced to the major sociological theories of social networks and social capital.  Issues of difference and diversity will be investigated in relation to social networks.  Students will learn how status differences shape our access to resources, our mobilization of social capital, and future status attainment.  Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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WGS 345 Topics in Culture & the Arts I: Gender in African Lit & Film
Kathleen J Wininger
Intellectual, cinematic and literary movements will be examined through generations of thinkers in African national, cultural and geographical settings. The course will look at texts from West, East, and Southern Africa dealing with theory, fiction, and visual culture. Important recent controversies in gender and postcolonial philosophy are explored. Cr 3.

For additional up-to-date course information, please visit MaineStreet Class Search. 

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