2013-14 Catalogs

Arts and Humanities Course Descriptions

For Upcoming Course Offerings click here.

Note: Satisfactory completion of both a 100-level college writing course (LCC 110/111) and a course on critical thinking (LCC 200) are prerequisites to all 300 level courses in this major.

HUM 105 Basic Photography
This course is an introduction to black and white photography, designed to help students gain understanding through "hands-on" photographic work. Lectures include classroom discussions concerning the history and aesthetics of photography, and techniques include camera and lens functions, exposure methods, basic black and white film processing, printmaking, print finishing, and presentation techniques. Cr. 3

HUM 120 / ENG 120 Introduction to Literature
This course is designed to introduce students to four basic literary genres: poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and drama. Through a combination of lectures, small group discussions, exercises, readings, and weekly writing assignments, students will work toward mastering a basic understanding of literature. Students will learn how to improve their writing, as well as their ability to read and analyze literature.  Cr. 3

HUM 125 French Language and Maine Society
This is an introductory course for the French language. Students will also learn about the cultural and linguistic context of French society in Maine and eastern North America. Students will use the French language they are studying to work with the Franco-American Collection and Maine Franco-American communities. Cr. 3

HUM 201 Creative Writing: Cultivating Your Inner Muse
This course is designed to help students hone their creative strategies and inspire them to commit to the practice of writing. We will explore the practical implications of creative expression. In addition to investigating the genres of fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry, students will identify and devise an approach to writing that works for them. This course is appropriate for novices and experienced writers alike and will include discussions of readings and traditional workshop response to students' writing. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 213 Metaphor in Literature, Science, and Religion
This course is a comparative study of literature, science, and religion, focusing on aims, methods, and values, and on the nature of truth and creativity in each discipline. Readings in fiction, poetry, religion, and modern physical and biological science provide a basis for discussion of the metaphoric nature of literary, religious, and scientific discourse. Our goal is to demonstrate that all three areas of human endeavor rely heavily on the metaphoric nature of language in their search for meaning and truth. This course consists of careful reading of texts, active class discussion, and out of class essays. No college science background required. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 230 Digital Photography
Working with digital cameras, students will learn to see photographically in color. They will gain a better understanding of color relationships using color as design elements and the overall artistic and aesthetic uses of color photography. Students will learn controls of their camera's software. Adobe Photoshop software will be the primary tool used for image control and manipulation. Cr. 3

HUM 250 Song as Literature
This course is designed to introduce students to the role of the song in our cultural heritage as a fundamental literary genre and a remarkably democratic and influential art form. The course traces the evolution of the story song from the epic ballads of Europe and North America through the development of songs for religious, political, nationalistic and purely entertainment purposes. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 260 Media Literacy and Theories of Popular Culture
In order to foster a critical approach to modern media, this course applies theory and analysis to popular culture texts. What do we learn about our modern industrial consumerist society from the texts it produces? What makes something popular, and how do we detect a text's projected world view? We will study TV, film, photography, graphic novels, the Internet, and music. Framing popular culture as a mass-media driven phenomenon, we will explain the deeper significance of our society using a selection of critical and theoretical commentary. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3

HUM 275 Discovering the Past: History Close to Home
Students will delve into the study of the past through a variety of historiographical techniques, within the context of the history of Lewiston. Students will develop a variety of research skills, including discovering and interpreting public and genealogical records, archaeological field reports, physical artifacts and architecture, as well as primary and secondary texts. Students will also encounter a variety of hands-on techniques, including fieldwalking and conducting oral-history interviews. The course offers an entry-point into the study of history while giving students valuable research and analytical skills that are readily transferable to other academic disciplines or professional life. Cr. 3

HUM 290 Thinking and Writing/Writing and Healing
Writing can be an experiential and subjective process that influences identity, births thought, and facilitates healing. Students will learn and practice exploratory writing in class as a form of self-analysis as well as investigate the research on how writing about chronic illnesses or traumatic events can reduce symptoms. Cr. 3
HUM 290 to be offered as a seminar every third semester, alternating Fall and Spring.

HUM 295 Creative Expression in Drawing
In this course, students will study drawing as a means to enhance powers of observation, imagination and expression.  The elements of line, shape, composition, value and texture will be explored in classroom drawing exercises and assignments and out of class drawing experiences.  Basic drawing techniques will be introduced in a variety of media.  Assignments will be geared to develop each individual's ability to make drawings of objects from the natural world and drawings based on the expression of ideas.  Cr. 3

HUM 298 Applied Arts & Humanities: Focus on Lewiston-Auburn and the Androscoggin River Valley Communities Intersecting art, literature, history, and philosophy and using a project-based, community-centered approach, this foundational course in the major addresses the field itself. Emphasis is placed on the significant contribution of Arts & Humanities study to life-long learning as well as to expanded, digitally informed, mastery of reading and writing, critical thinking and analysis, and the principles of design—all desired by a broad range of employers. Cr. 3

HUM 300 Literary and Cultural Theory and Practice
This course explores the relationships among writers, texts, and readers, each shaping and shaped by the others. The aim of this course is to introduce key concepts and critical terms of contemporary literary and cultural theory. Students learn to put these theories into practice. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English.  Cr. 3

HUM 301 French North America
Students will gain a broad understanding of the history and culture of French-speaking peoples in North America, from the colonial period to the modern era.  Students will encounter not just the well-known communities in French Canada and Haiti, but other smaller communities in North America.  Students will discover a variety of French cultural arts, including cuisine, music, art, theater and literature.  In particular, students will appreciate the relationship between Franco-Americans in New England and Maine, and the wider community of American Francophones. Cr. 3

HUM 303 Cross Cultural Perspectives on Non-western Art
This course surveys the visual arts of non-western cultures, most especially from Africa, Asia, and Australia.  It evaluates numerous theories trying to make sense of non-western forms of visual, symbolic, and political expression; unpacks the term "primitive Art;” delves into the history of western interest in these media; and debates whether they are “art” in a Western sense. Prerequisites:  College Writing (LCC 110/111) and Critical Thinking (LCC 200) with a C or better. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3
HUM 303 to be offered as a seminar every fourth semester, alternate Falls.

HUM 304 Writing Children's Literature: How to Craft Compelling Stories
An exploration of how real life stories, details, characters, and voices combine with images to create compelling children's stories. This course includes lecture, class discussion and writing workshops. Cr 3

HUM 305 Creative Writing: Poetry
This course is designed to introduce students to the art and practice of writing poetry. Organized as a workshop, it features close examination of the student's own writing as well as the work of outstanding contemporary poets. Prerequisite: HUM 201. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 306 Creative Writing: Fiction
This course is designed to introduce students to the art and practice of writing fiction. Organized as a workshop, it features close examination of the student's own writing as well as the work of outstanding contemporary fiction writers. Prerequisite: HUM 201. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 307 Writing Creative Nonfiction
This course explores the literary terrain between imaginative literature and journalism. Students study the fictional techniques employed by journalists and examine the questions their work poses about the uneasy boundaries between fact and fiction. Students will produce their own extended non-fiction essay. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 310 French Settlement in the North-East
Students will develop an appreciation for the unique culture of Francophones in the North East - including New England, Quebec and the Canadian Maritimes - through an understanding of the history of the region from its foundations to the present day.  Particular attention will be paid to the immigration of more than one million French Canadians to New England in the 19th century, and the resulting Franco-American society which developed in Maine and other states.  Students will appreciate the complex nature of Franco-American identity, the historical realities which have shaped it, and its future potential.  This course builds on themes encountered in HUM 301 French North America, though this is not a pre-requisite. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3

HUM 316 New Digital Media Literacies: Self-Fashioning and Critiquing Information
Students investigate, critique, and engage in a range of experiments to discover how new media radically change both thinking and language, as visual material, writing, and technology interplay online to form new, hybridic modes of reading and writing, teaching and learning. Drawing from such diverse fields as literature, geography, and education, areas covered include digital Shakespeare, the internet as a utopia, and a video game field study to explore multi-modal thinking. Prerequisites:  College Writing (LCC 110/111) and Critical Thinking (LCC 200) with a C or better. Cr. 3
HUM 316 to be offered as a seminar every third semester, Fall and Spring.

HUM/LOS 317 New Media and Social Networking: Identity and Expression Online
How are private and public identities established online? Are political and social movements built, organized, even undermined by social networking and online culture? Do online communities impact real world communication, language, and thought? Read critical theory on new media and explore technological and cultural associations with this nascent but pervasive phenomenon. Cr 3.

HUM 322 Professional Communications
This hands-on course will explore the types of writing and other forms of communication we use in a professional setting. By studying examples of writing in context and by creating original work, we will examine how get the point across in clear, concise and compelling language. We will also address creating strong and effective visual and verbal communication.  Cr. 3

HUM 325 World History and Geography I
This is the first in a series of two courses that are designed to help students develop an understanding of and an appreciation for world history and geography. The course's goal is to provide students with a humanistic background from which to better comprehend global complexities. This course will cover the period from prehistory to the age of modern expansion, from about 50,000 to 500 years ago. Prerequisite: Only students with more than 45 credits are permitted to take this course. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr.3

HUM 326 World History and Geography II
This is the second in a series of two courses that are designed to help students become more knowledgeable participants in today's rapidly changing world. Its goal is to make links between global history and modern world situations, as well as find the locations on a map. In other words, it is a primer in "global citizenship." This course covers the period from the Age of Modern Exploration (ca. 1500) to the present. Prerequisite: Only students with more than 45 credits are permitted to take this course. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies Cr. 3

HUM 330 International Labor, Literature, and the Arts
This course is designed to develop an appreciation for the diverse forms of work and labor-organizing around the world and their expression through literature and the arts. We will look at songs, films, murals, magazines, poetry, cartoons, novels, short stories, biographies, and more. Although we will consider work historically, our primary goal is to develop an international view of labor in the modern world. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 335 Working with Writers
This one-credit course provides training for Writing Assistants who work at the LAC Writing Center. Topics covered include basic composition theory, the Writing Center as a workplace, tutoring in digital formats, helping writers across the curriculum, and communication skills. The course prepares Writing Assistants for CRLA (College Reading and Learning Association) certification. The course may be taken three times (to align with the three levels of CRLA certification). Permission of instructor required. Cr. 1
HUM 335 to be offered as a seminar every Fall and Spring semester.

HUM/SBS 339 Ethnicity, Immigration and Identity: A focus on Lewiston, Maine
This course will focus on concepts of ethnicity, immigration, and identity through an investigation of the history of immigration in the city of Lewiston, Maine. We will explore how ethnic identity is defined, and why people emigrate.  Through historical and contemporary readings and films, oral histories and personal interviews, the course examines the challenges immigrants face as they attempt to assimilate within the U.S. while trying to maintain their native languages, traditions, cultures and communities.  This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3

HUM 340 World Indigenous and Native Societies
This course is designed to develop an appreciation for the diversity of native societies around the world. Some important points for us to consider are the differences and disparities between the developed nations and the fourth world, as well as the ambiguities of terms like "native," "traditional," "indigenous," "aboriginal," and "civilized." We also will consider case studies of modern native societies, such as the Mayan, Kurd, and Basque peoples, looking not just at their traditional histories and cultures, but also at some of their contemporary movements, including the EZLN, PKK, and ETA rebellions. We will seek to find common issues faced by native peoples around the world, as well as to identify problems unique to each group. A particular focus of this course will concern some of the Eastern Algonquian nations of Maine and the Northeast, including the Androscoggin, Almouchiquois, and Abenaki. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3

HUM 348 Reading Nature: Landscapes and Literature
Using the parallel skills of digital photography, reading, and writing, students will discover new ways of understanding the natural world. Readings and discussion will include excerpts from writers, such as Henry David Thoreau, Katharine S. White, Michael Pollan, Bernd Heinrich, as well as analysis of inspirational work of well-known nature photographers. The course includes journal and observational writing, creating digital photographs, and discussion of related topics of landscape photography history, philosophy, and anthropology. Cr. 3

HUM/SBS 349:  Trauma and Narrative
This course examines the medical, political, and cultural history of the concept of trauma, focusing on how trauma has become a core concern in both contemporary clinical psychology and literary criticism. We consider models for conceptualizing responses to traumatic experiences. Topics include the diagnostic criteria of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, recommended treatment approaches, risk and protective factors.  Students explore “narrative” vs. “traumatic” memories and carefully examine a number of literary texts and films to analyze the characteristics of representations of traumatic memory.  The idea, that fashioning a narrative of traumatic experience is essential to trauma therapy and to the healing effects of trauma literature, will also be explored. Cr. 3

HUM 350 Cultural Fieldwork
This course is designed to help students develop new ways to think about their place in the world. They will visit and meet with professionals from museums, archeological sites, ecological preserves, industrial plants, and others. As a fieldwork course, emphasis will be placed on projects done by students themselves. They will collect oral histories, search for lost documents, assess geographic and environmental problems, and do archeological site surveys, We will also develop a public project, such as the designation of a historical site. Cr. 3

HUM 355 Introduction to Journalism
This course focuses on the principles of journalistic practice and the important role journalism plays in democratic societies.  We consider the historical changes in the field, including the use of new technologies, techniques and methods in contemporary journalism.  Students will develop competencies in the skills of journalism, including research and interviewing, fact-checking and attribution, and journalistic styles. Prerequisites:  College Writing (LCC 110/111) and Critical Thinking (LCC 200) with a C or better. Cr. 3.
HUM 355 to be offered as a seminar every third semester, Fall and Spring

HUM/SBS 358 Representations of Motherhood
This course examines the ways in which motherhood is represented in various cultural forms (including film, literature and political rhetoric) and from within different historical and cultural contexts. Contemporary psychological theories will be considered in terms of how they are used to prescribe normative demands on women and mothers and also how they attribute various powers to mothers that then contribute to the construction of particular social policies and practices. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3

HUM/SBS 365: Psychological Language of Dreams and Fairytales
This course explores psychological approaches to understanding the language of dreams and fairytales.  Students consider how works of imaginative literature and dreams inform the theories of Freud and Jung and also how their theories, in turn, have shaped contemporary approaches to understanding images and metaphors.  We, then, culturally situate this psychological approach by comparing it with cross-cultural and literary approaches. Cr. 3

HUM/SBS 366 Transforming Words: Poetry and Psychologies of Change
This course examines the interrelationships between poetry and psychology, with a focus on transformations of meaning in words and lives. Topics will include the varying functions of poetry over the life span, poets' reflections on how and why they write, poetry as political witness and community catalyst, therapeutic uses of poetry, and the distinctive qualities of "poetic" language. Students have the option of pursuing community-based projects involving poetry. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 355 Introduction to Journalism
This course focuses on the principles of journalistic practice and the important role journalism plays in democratic societies.  We consider the historical changes in the field, including the use of new technologies, techniques and methods in contemporary journalism.  Students will develop competencies in the skills of journalism, including research and interviewing, fact-checking and attribution, and journalistic styles.  Cr. 3

HUM/SBS 365 Psychological Language of Dreams and Fairytales
This course explores psychological approaches to understanding the language of dreams and fairytales.  Students consider how works of imaginative literature and dreams inform the theories of Freud and Jung and also how their theories, in turn, have shaped contemporary approaches to understanding of images and metaphors.  We, then, culturally situate this psychological approach by comparing it with cross-cultural and literary approaches.  Cr. 3

HUM 369 Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles
In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: LCC 123 or LCC 345. Cr 1.5. Offered fall, spring, summer.

HUM 370 Literacy Studies
Students examine theories of literacy, the ongoing process of learning to read and write, as a basis both for writing their own literacy narratives and for community research documenting the narratives of others. With participant consent, these will be posted in the Ohio State University Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives in order to create a collective portrait of literacy in the Lewiston-Auburn area. Cr. 3

HUM 385 Global Past, Global Present 
This course is a thematic survey of global history from its origins to the present. Its aim is to provide a wide contextualized understanding of human existence in a new format that is called “Big History,” a concept that integrates knowledge from the natural and social sciences with the humanities. The result is a more realistic understanding of how humans fit into the vast expanse of the universe. As a part of this survey, students will consider some of the challenges of modern globalization, with an important theme being the quest to develop sustainable and ethical lifestyles. The overall focus of this course will be on what such knowledge might mean in everyday life and how we as responsible individuals and a responsible species should conduct ourselves in this world.  Cr. 3

HUM 400 Argument and Persuasion
In this writing course, students examine the nature of argumentation, the qualities of good arguments, inductive and deductive reasoning, and other commonly used types of reasoning (such as reasoning by analogy). Students also examine various persuasive strategies commonly used in popular media including politics and advertising. Emphasis is placed on improving students’ abilities to compose clear and persuasive arguments in writing.  Cr. 3

HUM 413 Job Search Skills for the 21st Century
In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 369. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5.

HUM 420 Speculative Fiction
This course focuses on speculative fiction—short stories, novels, and films— presenting alternate worlds and possibilities that allow readers to think about where our worlds are heading and to explore what it means to be human.  Works by H.G. Wells, Kazuo Ishiguro, Margaret Atwood, and others will be considered. Cr. 3

HUM 440 Narrating the Human: Topics in Auto/Biography Studies
The exploding new field of life writing encompasses a range of forms, including diaries, autobiographical novels, falsified memoirs, holocaust testimony, and biopics. Students analyze select readings with emphasis on human relationships configured in a specific time, place, and circumstance, as sociologically, historically, and geographically informed. Students also develop a life writing project of their own.  Cr. 3

HUM 447 Internship
This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: HUM/LOS/SBS/SCI 413. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr. 3-6

HUM 460 Franco-American Community and Archives Work
This course will consist of directed study and work with the Franco-American Collection. The largest repository of Franco-American documents in Maine and one of the largest in the United States, the Collection is home to a wide variety of letters, diaries, oral histories, newspapers, scrapbooks, maps, audio recordings, photographs, books, and academic papers. This diverse material comes from the Androscoggin Valley, other parts of Maine, the Northeast, and from around North America. Projects will include locating and obtaining materials, their conservation and preservation, cataloguing and accessioning documents, as well as projects of public service and community outreach. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3–6

HUM 465 Writing for Social Change
This course considers literary works (including poetry, fiction, nonfiction and drama) that affect social change. Additionally, it combines cultural analysis with various forms of writing as the means of calling for social justice and as tools for social transformation.  Students will address a pressing social concern within their communities.  Cr. 3

HUM 478 Community Research Projects
This course connects individual concerns and interests to a community fieldwork project as the basis for research. Students learn how to develop research questions, document their experiences with field notes, conduct library research, and produce an annotated bibliography.  The course is designed to prepare students to address one of the four themes of LCC 480 Senior Seminar (justice, democracy, sustainability, difference). Cr. 3

HUM 490 Overseas Investigations and Comparisons
This course will consist of directed study and work outside of the usually defined "boundaries" of the United States. This can mean outside the physical borders, such as Uruguay or New Brunswick, Chiapas, or Somalia. But it can also mean outside the perceived borders of the mainstream nation state, such as work on a Lakota Sioux reserve or with Latino/Latina community in East Los Angeles. A student in this course will work closely with a faculty member to develop a project, carry it through, and produce a summary presentation. Cr. 1-6

HUM 498 Independent Study Cr. 3-6

HUM 499 Special Topics
A variety of topics courses have been and will be offered. These have included: Religions of the World; Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Theory, Metaphor and Fashion; and Historical Archeology Field School. Cr. 3