2013-14 Catalogs

Course Descriptions

School of Business Undergraduate Course List
School of Business Graduate Course List

2013-2014 Undergraduate Course List

University Course Catalogs

ACC 110 Financial Accounting Information for Decision Making
This course is designed to help students appreciate the role of accountants in providing information helpful to decisions of investors, creditors, government regulators, and others, and how that information can be used. Emphasis is on understanding the meaning and value of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. The role of the auditor, internal controls, and ethical issues are examined. The annual report is used to explore how corporations apply accounting principles in presentations to the public. Prerequisites: minimum of 12 earned credit hours and evidence of successfully meeting the University’s writing and mathematics proficiency requirements. Cr 3.

ACC 211 Managerial Accounting Information for Decision Making
This course will provide students with the opportunity to learn basic concepts and accounting systems involved in the use of managerial accounting information in making planning and control decisions in organizations. Basic concepts include different types of costs (e.g., direct, indirect, fixed, variable, and relevant costs). Basic accounting systems include systems for cost allocation (e.g., job-order costing, activity-based costing), planning (e.g., cost-volume-profit analysis, master budget), and control (e.g., flexible budgets, variance analysis, responsibility accounting, performance measurement). Prerequisites: ACC 110 (C- or higher) and sophomore standing. Cr 3.

ACC 221 The Financial Accounting Cycle
This course serves as a “bridge” between the introductory level (user-focused) financial accounting course and Financial Reporting I, which is required for the accounting major. The course reviews the accounting cycle: the journal entries for typical business transactions including adjusting and closing entries, and the preparation of accounting statements including preparation of a complete accounting cycle exercise. The course must be completed prior to enrollment in ACC 301/501. Prerequisite: ACC 110 (C- or higher) or MBA 502. Cr 1.

ACC 301 Financial Reporting I
An examination of the conceptual framework, the primary financial statements, and the methods and rationale for recording and reporting assets. Emphasis is on the effect of present and potential economic events on the financial statements. The course discusses the advantages, limitations and deficiencies associated with generally accepted principles in connection with presenting decision useful information. Prerequisites: ACC 110 (C- or higher), ACC 211 (C- or higher), ACC 221 (with a grade of C or higher), and junior standing. Cr 3.

ACC 302 Financial Reporting II
An examination of the methods and rationale for recording liabilities and equity. The course also examines the statement of cash flows. Emphasis is on the effect of present and potential economic events on the primary financial statements. The course discusses the advantages, limitations, and deficiencies associated with generally accepted principles in connection with presenting decision-useful information. Prerequisites: ACC 301 and junior standing. Cr 3.

ACC 329 Accounting Information Systems
This course explores the theory and tools needed to select, use, set up internal controls for, and obtain information from accounting systems. The basic debits and credits of double-entry accounting are reviewed using a manual practice set that includes preparing typical business documents. The business activities performed in the expenditure, production, and revenue cycles are covered together with the documents, internal controls, and reporting needs relevant to each cycle. Significant emphasis is placed on the effects of error on financial reports, the controls needed to prevent and detect errors in accounting systems, and the correction of system errors. The use of small business accounting software is introduced. Students use accounting software to set up accounts, process transactions, and produce managerial and standard financial accounting reports. Prerequisites: ACC 211 (C- or higher), ACC 301(or concurrent), and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

ACC 395 Internship I
The first internship course in accounting is described in the general School of Business catalog text. Prerequisites: junior standing, 2.5 GPA or higher, and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. Enrollment is normally limited to accounting majors or minors who have not completed degree requirements. Pass/fail. Cr 3.

ACC 396 Internship II
This is the second internship course in accounting. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA or higher, and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. May petition Department to take concurrently with ACC 395. Enrollment is normally limited to accounting majors who have not completed degree requirements. Credits from this course count as general electives only. Pass/fail. Cr 3.

ACC 405 Cost Management Systems
This course is designed to explore how cost management systems can be used to support competitive strategy in global markets. This is accomplished by providing an understanding of the underlying and fundamental concepts in cost accounting. Group activities and writing are an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: ACC 211 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

ACC 410 Auditing and Assurance
This course examines the public accounting profession, auditing standards, and professional ethics. The course explores the process by which an auditor forms an opinion as to the “fairness of presentation” of financial statements, giving an overview of audit evidence and audit evidence accumulation methodology. The course exposes students both to the demand for and supply of the profession’s flagship service, financial statement audits, and to the nature of the value-added assurance and attestation services decision makers demand in the information age. The course illustrates with real companies, links class discussion and assignments to student skills, and encourages unstructured problem solving. This course provides an opportunity for students to study auditing concepts and theory at an advanced level by examining a number of issues, with extensive reading from the auditing research literature, in addition to the textbook material. Prerequisites: ACC 302 (or concurrent), ACC 329, and senior standing. Fall only. Cr 3.

ACC 413 Concepts and Strategies of Taxation
This course provides a conceptual understanding of the federal tax system, and its impact on individuals, corporations, and partnerships. The primary emphasis is on fundamental income tax concepts and principles, with an overview of other taxes. Detailed technical coverage and return preparation are minimized. The economic, political, social, and judicial reasoning underlying tax provisions are explored. Tax issues and changes under current consideration at the national, state, local and international levels are discussed. Basic research skills and methodology are introduced. Prerequisites: ACC 110 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Fall only. Cr 3.

ACC 416 Governmental and Nonprofit Accounting
An analysis of the environment and characteristics of government and nonprofit organizations, with an in-depth study of the basic concepts and standards of financial reporting for such entities. Financial management and accountability considerations specific to government and nonprofit organizations are emphasized. Prerequisites: ACC 301 and junior standing. Fall only Cr 3.

ACC 418 Principles of Fraud Examination
This course examines the subject of fraud from both management and accounting perspectives. Utilizing a variety of techniques including text, lecture, case studies, guest speakers, and occasional videos, the course seeks to familiarize students with the conditions that facilitate fraud; the profile of the fraud perpetrator; common types of fraud; and methods of prevention, detection, and resolution. Numerous historical cases of fraud are examined. Students are brought to appreciate the prevalence of fraud in current society as well as the almost innumerable ways in which it can be committed. Students entering the business world are provided a perspective for understanding. Prerequisites: ACC 110 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

ACC 490 Independent Study in Accounting
Selected topics in the various areas of accounting, auditing, and income taxes may be studied and researched on an independent basis. Enrollment is normally limited to accounting and finance degree candidates. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and program chair and senior standing. Cr 1-3.

ACC 499 Special Topics in Accounting
Prerequisites vary by topic. Cr 1-3.

BUS 101 Getting Down to Business
This course is an integrated, comprehensive overview of the way a business operates and what it takes to manage one. It introduces students to the basic, interdisciplinary knowledge used to run a business—such as finance, marketing, and management—by giving students an extended opportunity to manage a business in a simulated business environment. Students also get experience with, and enhance their ability to work in, self-managed teams. The course is strongly recommended as a first business course for all first-year students who are, or are considering, a major or minor in the School of Business. The course is designed to, in part, acclimate the recent high school graduate to USM. It is open to all University students, except those with more than 23 credits or credit for an introductory business course such as BUS 200. Cr 3.

BUS 200 Introduction to Business
This course is designed to introduce the student to the contemporary business environment and the variety of typical activities engaged in by business professionals. It explores how different business functions are integrated to accomplish the goals of the business within an increasingly competitive business environment. It is designed for anyone interested in becoming knowledgeable about successful business practices. Students with credit for BUS 101 or other introductory business course may not enroll. This course is intended for non-majors, and is restricted to students with fewer than 9 credits in business, finance, and accounting. Business and accounting majors may not enroll without the approval of their academic advisor. Those with credit for BUS 101 may not enroll. Prerequisites: Fewer than nine credits in BUS, FIN and ACC. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 201 Personal Finance
Primary emphasis is to teach students how to become more knowledgeable and independent over money matters. Topics such as obtaining financial aid, managing student loans, career and education planning, budgeting, credit cards, stock market investing, real estate, and insurance will be covered. Upon completing the course, students will be on their way to making better money decisions. This course is open to all USM students. When taken by business or accounting majors, this course will give general elective credit. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 203 Career Planning and Development
Students in this course identify and develop career goals and plans while improving their writing skills. Students engage in activities relating to personal and professional interest profiling, interest and employment inventories, interview preparation, resume construction, job searches, and business writing. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and ENG 100/101C or equivalent course. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 210 Introduction to Sport Management
This course provides an overview of the business of sports, including career opportunities. The value of professional management to sports organizations is examined. Cr 3.

BUS 260 Marketing
This course is an introduction to the field of marketing. Topics include marketing strategy for products and services, market segmentation, targeting, and positioning, product issues, pricing, promotion, distribution, consumer behavior, marketing research and information systems, international marketing, and nonprofit marketing. Prerequisite: minimum of 24 earned credit hours. Cr 3.

BUS 275 Applied Business Analysis
This course provides students with an understanding of statistical concepts and tools that are critical in business decision making. The discussion and development of each topic are presented in an application setting, with the statistical results providing insights and solutions to real world problems. The coursework requires extensive use of commercially available statistical software. Prerequisite: ABU 190 (C or higher grade, or test-out option ), MAT 108 (C- or higher grade), and MAT 210 (C- or higher grade) or other approved statistics course (see http://usm.maine.edu/sb/stats for approved courses). Cr 3.

BUS 280 Legal Environment of Business
This course introduces students to the legal system, tort law, product liability, consumer law, labor law, equal employment law, intellectual property law, and other topics. It stresses the social responsibility of business and the legal and ethical framework in which businesses must function. Cr 3.

BUS 311 Sport Marketing
Basic marketing concepts are applied to sport organizations, both amateur and professional. Topics include promotions and public relations, sport consumer behavior, strategic marketing planning, marketing information management, marketing communications, and sponsorship. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher). Cr 3.

BUS 312 Sport Law
This course examines the legal system, its terminology, and principles in the context of professional and amateur sports. Emphasis is on identifying and analyzing legal issues, the ramifications of those issues, and the means of limiting the liability of sport organizations. Prerequisites: BUS 280 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Fall only. Cr 3.

BUS 313 Sport Facility Management
An investigation of the functions of sport managers in the design, operation, and financing of facilities and venues. Students will examine the issues pertaining to management of public and private arenas, stadiums, theatres, galleries, festivals, racetracks, and multipurpose facilities. Management of temporary facilities for special events will also be considered. Prerequisite: BUS 311 or BUS 315. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 314 Sport Communication
This course is designed to introduce the student to the role of effective communication in the sport, art, and entertainment industry settings. The nature and function of communication will be examined in a variety of settings. Emphasis will be placed on interpersonal communications, public relations, mass media relations, public speaking, and innovative technology. Prerequisite: BUS 311. Limited offerings. Cr. 3.

BUS 315 Sport Finance
Basic theory in finance and accounting is applied to managerial control of sport organizations. Topics include forms of ownership, taxation, financial analysis, feasibility studies, and economic impact studies. Prerequisites: FIN 320, (C or higher) and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

BUS 316 Sport Event Management
This course is designed to provide practical involvement in managing a sport event. Students will be assigned to committees for which they will plan, organize, publicize and manage all aspects of event operations during the semester. A required component of the course will include a commitment to work with the actual event. Prerequisite: BUS 311 and junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 317 Sport Sponsorship and Sales
Overview of all elements of sport sponsorships, including rationale, benefits, proposal development. Sales management strategies will focus specifically on the unique aspects of sport sponsorship environment. Students will create marketing surveys, develop sponsorship proposals, identify and contact potential sponsors, conduct negotiation and sales, learn activation techniques, and evaluate sponsor packages. Prerequisite: BUS 311 or BUS 315. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 318 Athletics Administration
This course is designed to introduce the student to the management issues faced by administrators within collegiate and high school athletics departments. Students will develop an understanding of issues such as governance, financial considerations, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and conference compliance, gender equity and Title IX, conference membership issues and realignment, legislation, and reform. Prerequisite: BUS 311 or BUS 315. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 321 Independent Projects in Marketing
This course is designed to give marketing students an opportunity to conduct independent research and projects with a faculty mentor. Students will meet regularly with their mentor during the semester to discuss their independent studies progress. At the end of the semester, students submit a written report and present their findings to their faculty mentor and the business client (if applicable). Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher), junior standing, and instructor permission. Cr. 1-4.

BUS 335 International Business
Introduction to the global economy and the political and cultural environments of international business. Topics include financial, marketing, and human resource issues in international business. Prerequisites: ECO 101, ECO 102, and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

BUS 336 Approved International Experience
An educational activity while outside the U.S. that contributes to the student’s understanding of international business and which has been approved by one of the international business faculty members. (See International Business Track for more information.) Prerequisite: junior standing. Cr. 3.

BUS 337 Approved International Business Experience
An educational activity while outside the U.S. that directly contributes to the student’s understanding of international business and has been preapproved by one of the international business faculty members. Normally limited to an upper-level course in a business discipline, including economics and/or law. (See International Business Track for more information.) Prerequisite: junior standing. Cr. 3.

BUS 340 Managing Organizational Behavior
A survey of the disciplines of management and organizational behavior, and of the practices managers employ in planning, organizing, leading, and controlling organizations. Topics include self-awareness, perception and decision making, individual differences and diversity, motivation, group dynamics, communication, stress, power and politics, organizational design, and change. The environmental context, workforce diversity, the global economy, and managerial ethics are core integrating themes. Prerequisite: junior standing. Cr 3.

BUS 342 Leadership
The purpose of this course is to help students be more effective exercising leadership. To do this, the course will first teach the distinction among leadership, authority, and management, and also among different leadership situations. The course will then provide experiential exercises and exposure to tools and techniques appropriate to the various challenges. Prerequisites: BUS 340 (C or higher) and junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 345 Information Technology/Management Information Systems
Surveys information/systems technology for the management of corporate information as a resource. Managerial and technical dimensions of information systems are blended in a framework of information technology. Specific topics will evolve with the field but may include data communications, information systems theory, database concepts, and decision support systems. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Cr 3.

BUS 346 Human Resource Management
Analysis of professional practice issues in personnel and human resource management. Students will form in-class enterprises to explore topics including: human resource planning, recruitment, staffing, performance appraisal, compensation and reward system design, training and development, employee rights and safety, labor-management relations, and legal and international dimensions of human resource management. Prerequisite: junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 347 Triple-Bottom-Line Business
How can firms pursue profits without harming the planet or the ‘way life should be’? This course explores sustainable business strategies and practices that can be used to manage the triple bottom line of financial, environmental, and social performance. Ethical action is a recurring theme. Students with credit for BUS 357 may not enroll. Prerequisites: junior standing, BUS 260 (C- or higher), BUS 280 (C- or higher),or instructor permission. Fall only. Cr 3.

BUS 358 E-Commerce
This course examines various business models used in electronic commerce, provides an understanding of how an e-presence is established, and explores the strategic use of e-commerce in a global environment. Students will develop skills in establishing a Web presence for a business and business planning. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher), BUS 345 (C or higher), and junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 359 Customer Relationship Management
Customer relationship management (CRM) is a key strategic process for marketing. This course will examine the importance of customer value and introduce traditional CRM and contemporary social CRM approaches. Students will develop skills to maximize profits and optimize the selection, acquisition, and retention of desired customers. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher), BUS 275 (C- or higher), and junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 360 Marketing Strategy
This course prepares students to evaluate strategic marketing options, make informed marketing decisions, and formulate strategic marketing policies, based on quantitative and qualitative analysis. Basic skills emphasized in this class are situation analysis, management by profit and loss, implementing marketing strategies, brand management, positioning, and market segmentation. This is a foundation course for marketing majors. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher) and sophomore standing. Cr. 3.

BUS 361 International Marketing
This course addresses the critical marketing skills required for business survival in today’s world economy. Students learn to apply global marketing and financial management concepts and techniques during a semester-long, simulated global market program. Students analyze and manage international product lines and adapt to cultural differences while working in a computer simulated global marketplace. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Fall only. Cr 3.

BUS 362 Market Opportunity Analysis
In this course, student teams work with a local business to develop a market opportunity. Areas of analysis include target-market identification, industry trends, demand analysis, capacity and fit issues, competitive analysis, and forecasting. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Students are encouraged to take BUS 365 and BUS 369 before BUS 362. Cr 3.

BUS 363 Branding and Advertising
This course develops the necessary knowledge and skills to create a clear and compelling portrayal of the brand offering, whether it involves small businesses, entrepreneurial ventures, corporations or not-for-profit organizations. It uses a mix of different marketing communication methods in order to create a sustainable competitive advantage in the marketplace. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 364 Professional Selling
This course is designed to equip students with the fundamental understanding of the role of professional selling within all types of organizations, with an emphasis on development of communication, relationship building, and presentation skills. The course is interactive/“hands on” and will include: video case studies, role playing, sales presentations, guest lectures, use of PowerPoint, use of sales management software, group presentations, mini lectures, and Internet research. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 365 Consumer Behavior
This course examines alternative explanations of consumer behavior. Emphasis is placed on cultural, sociological, and psychological influences on consumption. Other topics include consumer decision processes and the way managers use consumer characteristics to segment the market and develop marketing plans. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher) and junior standing. Students with credit for BUS 165 may not enroll. Cr 3.

BUS 366 Retail Management
Students examine the use of merchandise and service to satisfy the needs of targeted consumers in a competitive retail environment. Topics include marketing strategy, merchandising, location, store management, non-store retailing, pricing and financial analysis, organizational structure and human resources, and information systems. Prerequisites: ACC 110 (C- or higher), BUS 260 (C- or higher) or instructor permission, and junior standing. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 367 Marketing Management
Students gain experience making marketing decisions as members of teams. The emphasis is on applying a management perspective to marketing decision making. Students must integrate knowledge from other functional disciplines into a strategic marketing planning framework. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher), any 300-level marketing course, and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

BUS 369 Marketing Research
Students learn the process of marketing research as they work on a semester-long project with community businesses and organizations. Students learn how to produce a secondary data report, how to design and conduct a qualitative research study, and how to design and analyze the results of an online survey. Students will also acquire key secondary data research techniques, one-on-one interview skills, questionnaire design principles, and data analysis skills. The course has a significant PC lab component to encourage hands-on learning. Prerequisites: MAT 210 (C- or higher) or other approved statistics course (see http://usm.maine.edu/sb/stats for approved courses)(or concurrent), BUS 260 (C- or higher), and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

BUS 370 Management Science
This course examines the role, perspective, and commonly used tools of quantitative analysis in business decision making. Emphasis is placed upon developing students’ abilities to recognize the need for quantification; formulate business problems quantitatively; select and test computer-based, decision-support system models; collect meaningful data; and interpret the implications of analysis results. Prerequisites: ABU 190 (C or higher grade, or test-out option), BUS 275 (C- or higher) or MAT 212, and junior standing. Students with credit for BUS 270 or BUS 371 may not enroll. Cr 3.

BUS 375 Production/Operations Management
An examination of the role of operations within manufacturing and service organizations. Emphasis is placed upon recognizing operational opportunities and tradeoffs, and employing quantitative and qualitative tools and decision-support systems to assist strategic and operational decision making. Topics include: process design, quality management, capacity planning, supply chain management, and production planning. Prerequisites: ABU 190 (C or higher) or test-out option, BUS 275 (C- or higher) or MAT 212, BUS 370 (C or higher), and junior standing. Cr 3.

BUS 377 Information Visualization
In this course, students will learn to create charts, maps, and other visualizations to tell stories and to create effective graphical displays of evidence.  Students will learn to critically evaluate examples from print media and the internet after learning the foundations of information visualization.  Prerequisites: BUS 275 (B- or higher) or other approved course (see: usm.maine.edu/sb/vis.html for approved courses) and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

BUS 378 Sport Management Practicum
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply learned sport management skills, theories, and ideas in a sport industry setting.  The course will allow a student to bridge the gap between classroom learning and practical application.  This course is optional.  The practicum will be a minimum of 200 hours and may be completed full or part-time.  This course is open to students in the Sport Management General Track Major only who have not completed degree requirements. Prerequisites: BUS 311, junior standing and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor..May not be taken pass/fail. Cr. 3

BUS 380 Advanced Legal Issues in Business
This course will cover negotiable instruments, contract law, trusts and estates, property law, and other legal topics. This course is intended to provide detailed study of many important legal issues facing businesses. Prerequisite: BUS 280 (C- or higher), junior standing, or permission of the instructor. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 382 International Business Law
An examination of legal issues affecting international business transactions. Topics include contracts, sale of goods, letters of credit, regulation of imports and exports, business competition law, protection of intellectual property rights, and ethical issues. Prerequisites: BUS 280 (C- or higher) or equivalent, and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

BUS 385 Entrepreneurship and Venture Creation
This course is about starting a business and about the benefits and costs, both personal and professional, of an entrepreneurial career. Students learn how to establish start-up teams, identify opportunities, and obtain resources. The course involves written self-appraisals, case analyses, team work, and presentations of comprehensive business plans. Prerequisites: ACC 110 (C- or higher), ACC 211 (C- or higher) or permission, BUS 362 or BUS 369 (or permission), and junior standing. Fall only. Cr 3.

BUS 391 Internship in Sustainable Business
See BUS 395 description for requirements. Cr 3.

BUS 392 Internship in Marketing
See BUS 395 description for requirements. Cr 3.

BUS 393 Internship in Sport Management
(Limited to students in General Management Major, Sport Management Track – 2007 and 2008 catalogs only.) See BUS 395 description for requirements. Cr. 3.

BUS 394 Internship in International Business
See BUS 395 description for requirements. Cr 3.

BUS 395 Internship I
This is the first internship course in business administration. Prerequisites: junior standing, 2.33 GPA or higher, and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. Enrollment is limited to School of Business majors and minors who have not completed degree requirements. Majors are limited to a maximum of six internship credits toward the degree; minors are limited to a maximum of three internship credit hours. Cr 3.

BUS 396 Internship II
This is the second internship course in business administration. Prerequisites: BUS 395, 2.33 GPA or higher, and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. Enrollment is limited to baccalaureate School of Business majors who have not completed degree requirements. Majors are limited to a maximum of six internship credits toward the degree. Credits from this course count as general electives only. Cr 3.

BUS 397 Internship in Sport Management/Advance Field Experience
The internship requirement is considered to be one of the most critical components of the Sport Management Program. Students will undertake a 12-15 week, full-time (40 hours per week) supervised internship. This opportunity is expected to enhance the student’s academic experiences via a required industry analysis paper, a research project, weekly logs and a portfolio, as well as provide additional work experience and networking opportunities. Internship experiences may take place in any of the varied sport industry settings. Students may obtain internships in any region of the country and in some cases may receive financial compensation.
Prerequisite: junior standing, BUS 311, 2.33 GPA or higher and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. Enrollment is normally limited to sport management (internship track) majors who have not completed degree requirements. May not be taken Pass/Fail. Cr 6.

BUS 398 Marketing Practicum
Working in self-directed teams, students carry out a marketing project to meet the goals of a partner in the business community. As part of the course, students are to generate publicity for the school and formally present the results of the project to their external partners. The course emphasizes problem-based learning and the development of professional skills. If more than 3 credits are earned, the extra credits count as general electives. Students are encouraged to take BUS 365 and BUS 369 before this course. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher), any 300-level marketing course, GPA of 2.5 or higher, junior standing, or instructor permission. Limited offerings. Cr 3.

BUS 399 Special Topics in Business
Prerequisites vary. Limited offerings. Cr 1-3.

BUS 415 Sport Management Seminar
This capstone sport management course is designed to integrate the academic work studied throughout the curriculum. Critique of governance issues and policy development in a range of sport organizations will be considered. Students will participate in decision making and strategic planning cases. Emphasis will focus on the strategic, profit-oriented, and ethical decision making that is necessary for upper level sport managers to be successful. Students will conduct in-depth analysis of a specific area of the field. Prerequisite: BUS 311, BUS 312, BUS 315. Spring only. Cr 3.

BUS 450 Business Policy and Strategy
An in-depth examination of the strategic management process in large complex organizations. This course uses case study analysis, discussion and integrative capstone projects to provide students with opportunities to learn and to apply strategic management theories and concepts. These include competitive analysis, value-chain analysis, generic business strategies, corporate strategy, and global strategy. The course fulfills the capstone requirement of the USM Core. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher), BUS 340 (C or higher), FIN 320 (C or higher), GPA 2.0 or higher, and senior standing. Students matriculating fall 2011 and later must fulfill the University Core Requirement of “Ethical Inquiry, Social Responsibility and Citizenship” prior to enrollment. Cr 3.

BUS 485 Managing the Growing Entrepreneurial Venture
An interdisciplinary course emphasizing the application of entrepreneurial management concepts and strategies to the growth-oriented small business beyond the start-up stage to eventual maturity and harvest. Topics include venture opportunity analysis, stages of small business growth, making the transition from entrepreneur to entrepreneurial manager, formulating and implementing growth strategies, building an effective organization, marshaling organizational and financial resources for growth, managing under adversity, and managing rapid growth. Prerequisites: BUS 260 (C- or higher), BUS 340 (C or higher), FIN 320 (C or higher), and senior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

BUS 490 Independent Study
Selected topics in business administration may be studied and researched on an independent basis. Enrollment is normally limited to business administration degree candidates. Prerequisites: junior standing and permission of instructor and Department chair. Cr 1-6.

FIN 320 Basic Financial Management
This course is a balanced introduction to the theory and practice of financial management. It prepares students to make basic financial decisions and understand the decisions of others. Topics include time value of money, capital markets, risk and return, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, capital structure, and working capital management. Prerequisites: ACC 110 (C- or higher), ECO 101 or ECO 102, MAT 210 (C- or higher) or other approved statistics course (see http://usm.maine.edu/sb/stats for approved courses), and junior standing. Cr 3.

FIN 321 Personal Financial Planning
This course begins to prepare students for a career as a professional financial planner by providing fundamental concepts and principles of personal financial planning, applied with a quantifiable approach to achieving client objectives. Topics include general principles of financial planning, the changing nature of the financial services environment, code of ethics and professional responsibility, credit and debt management, budgeting, personal taxes, employee benefit planning, goal attainment, investment planning, risk management through the purchase of insurance, retirement planning, and estate planning. The course will include casework and current financial planning problem scenarios. Prerequisites: FIN 320 (C or higher) and junior standing. Cr 3.

FIN 323 Derivatives: Options, Futures, and Swaps
This course explores the markets and valuations techniques for futures, options, and swaps contracts. Hedging and speculating techniques using derivatives are stressed. Financial engineering techniques are developed using derivatives which can adjust the risk and return offered by traditional assets. Topics include: Forward contracts, stock futures, interest rate futures, stock index futures, stock options, interest rate options, and swaps. Prerequisites: FIN 320 (C or higher) and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

FIN 326 Financial Modeling
Introduces principles and techniques for building and implementing financial models. Topics are drawn from a variety of areas: financial planning, investments, derivatives, and corporate finance. The course emphasizes the application of financial modeling techniques in identifying and implementing business solutions. The course will be of special interest to students seeking hands-on experience constructing financial models. Prerequisites: FIN 320 (C or higher) and junior standing. Fall only. Cr 3.

FIN 327 Investment Management
Introduction to the securities markets, investment media, and strategies for managing individual and institutional investment portfolios. Special attention is directed to the risk and rate-of-return aspects of corporate stocks and bonds, government bonds, options, futures, and mutual funds. Prerequisites: FIN 320 (C or higher) and junior standing. Spring only. Cr 3.

FIN 330 International Financial Management
This course focuses upon financial management of the multinational corporation with assets domiciled abroad. The financial dimensions of multinationals require extensive knowledge of how to manage foreign exchange-denominated assets and liabilities and how to borrow money and issue stock in foreign countries. Thus, a basic overview of foreign exchange theory, balance of payments adjustment mechanisms, and international trade theory is provided. Other topics include: international import and export financing, international working capital management, multinational capital budgeting, and international cost of capital. Prerequisites: FIN 320 (C or higher) and junior standing. Fall only. Cr 3.

FIN 395 Internship I
The first internship course in finance is described in the general School of Business catalog text. Prerequisites: junior standing, 2.5 GPA or higher, and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. Enrollment is normally limited to finance majors who have not completed degree requirements. Majors are limited to a maximum of six internship credits toward the degree. Pass/fail. Cr 3.

FIN 396 Internship II
This is the second internship course in finance. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA or higher, and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. May petition Department to take concurrently with FIN 395. Enrollment is normally limited to accounting and finance majors who have not completed degree requirements. Majors are limited to a maximum of six internship credits toward the degree. Credits from this course count as general electives only. Pass/fail. Cr 3.

FIN 490 Independent Study in Finance
Selected topics in the various areas of finance may be studied and researched on an independent basis. Enrollment is normally limited to accounting and finance degree candidates. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and program chair and senior standing. Cr 1-3.

FIN 399 Special Topics in Finance
Prerequisites vary by topic. Cr 1-3.

FIN 499 Special Topics in Finance
Prerequisites vary by topic. Cr 1-3.

RMI 320 Introduction to Risk Management and Insurance
This course introduces students to the nature of risk, risk identification, general risk management techniques, and the management of risk through insurance. It covers why the individual or corporation purchases insurance, what constitutes an intelligent insurance plan, and what products are available in the insurance marketplace. This course is designed for non-majors and is a prerequisite for more advanced risk management and insurance courses. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and successful completion of the University’s Core requirement in quantitative reasoning. Cr 3.

RMI 330 Health, Life, and Disability Insurance
This course covers health, life, and disability insurances from the perspective of insurance providers, employers, and consumers. Individual and group health insurance product management and the relationship between product characteristics and insurance company investments, financing, and marketing decisions are discussed. Managed care techniques, benefit package design, and cost sharing mechanisms are assessed in the context of resolving incentive conflicts and meeting cost-containment objectives. The basic principles underlying life insurance are covered as well as the various types and policy provisions for life insurance. Short-term and long-term disability insurance, definitions of disability, and various policy provisions for individual and employer provided group disability insurance are discussed. Evaluation of insurance company financial strength and the impact of regulation on company management and behavior are considered. Prerequisite: RMI 320. Spring only. Cr 3.

RMI 350 Managing Risk with Property and Liability Insurance
This course examines the many commercial property and liability exposures faced by businesses. An emphasis is placed on using commercial property and liability insurance as a method of reducing, managing, and transferring business risk. Topics include commercial general liability, business automobile, workers’ compensation, commercial property, business income, and business owner’s insurance. The legal environment of property and liability insurance and risk financing are considered. The fundamental structure and business of property casualty insurance are discussed. Prerequisite: RMI 320. Fall only. Cr 3.

RMI 395 Internship I
The first internship course in risk management and insurance is described in the general School of Business catalog text. Prerequisites: junior standing, 2.33 GPA or higher, and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. Enrollment is normally limited to general management majors in the risk management and insurance track who have not completed degree requirements. Majors are limited to a maximum of six internship credits toward the degree. Pass/fail. Cr 3.

RMI 396 Internship II
This is the second internship course in risk management and insurance. Prerequisites: 2.33 GPA or higher, and permission of a School of Business advisor and instructor. May petition Department to take concurrently with RMI 395. Enrollment is normally limited to general management majors in the risk management and insurance track who have not completed degree requirements. Majors are limited to a maximum of six internship credits toward the degree. Credits from this course count as general electives only. Pass/fail. Cr 3.

2012-2013 Graduate Course List

University Course Catalogs

ACC 630 Management Accounting Systems
This course examines how management accounting systems can be used to establish and maintain competitive advantages in an increasingly competitive global economy. Emphasis is on designing management accounting systems which: (1) support both the operational and strategic goals of the organization, (2) provide feedback to senior management about organizational units’ performance, and (3) serve as the linkage between the strategy of the organization and the execution of that strategy in individual operating units. A blend of contemporary theory with practical applications and actual company experiences will be utilized to accomplish the course objectives. Prerequisites: MBA 501, MBA 502. Cr 3.

ACC 631 Current Issues in Accounting
This course examines current issues and developments in the accounting profession. Coverage includes discussion of issues in auditing and assurance, financial accounting, taxation, and other relevant areas. Prerequisite: ACC 410 and ACC 413. Cr.3.

ACC 633 Tax Policy and Administration
This course examines tax policy, including such topics as how taxes affect the economy, guidelines for evaluating tax systems, and proposals to replace or reform tax systems. Tax administration process and professional tax practice will also be discussed. Course emphasis will be on federal taxes, with some exposure to state taxes. Prerequisite: MBA 501 or equivalent. Cr 3.

ACC 634 Advanced Business Taxation
This course begins with concepts of Federal tax research methodology including communication of research results. The second section of the course considers corporate tax topics including income taxation of corporations, pass-through entities (S corporations and partnerships), multistate taxation and tax-exempt organizations. Students will write tax research memoranda and client letters as well as prepare relevant tax returns. Prerequisite: ACC 413 or equivalent. Cr 3.

ACC 635 Advanced Individual Taxation
This course begins with a review of Federal tax research methodology including the communication of research results. Then, the course considers topics in advanced individual taxation such as AMT issues, like-kind exchanges, and installment sales. The final section of the course considers family tax planning issues including federal estate and gift taxation and the income taxation of trusts and estates. Students will write tax research memoranda and client letters as well as prepare relevant tax returns. Prerequisite: ACC 413 or equivalent. Cr 3.

ACC 641 Advanced Financial Accounting Topics
This course explores a variety of advanced financial accounting topics such as the theoretical and practical concepts of business combinations, partnerships, foreign currency, and other issues. Prerequisite: ACC 302. Cr. 3.

ACC 691 Independent Study in Accounting
Selected topics in the areas of accounting may be studied and researched on an independent basis. Enrollment is normally limited to degree candidates concentrating in accounting. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and curriculum chair. Cr 1-3.

ACC 695 Internship in Accounting
This internship education course is described in the preceding text. Prerequisites: completion of foundation courses, 3.0 GPA or higher, and permission of instructor and curriculum chair. Enrollment is normally limited to degree candidates concentrating in accounting. A maximum of three credits of ACC 695 may be used toward the degree. Cr 1-3.

ACC 699 Special Topics in Accounting
Prerequisites vary. Cr 3.

BUS 340 Managing Organizational Behavior
A survey of the disciplines of management and organizational behavior and the practices managers employ in planning, organizing, leading, and controlling organizations. Topics include self-awareness, perception and decision making, individual differences and diversity, motivation, group dynamics, communication, stress, power and politics, organizational design, and change. The environmental context, workforce diversity, the global economy, and managerial ethics are core integrating themes. Prerequisite: junior standing. Cr 3.

MBA 501 Economic Analysis
An intensive survey of microeconomic theory and macroeconomic theory. Economic problems such as price and output decisions, resource allocations, inflation, and unemployment are analyzed. Cr 3.

MBA 502 Financial Accounting
This course offers an opportunity to gain a firm understanding of basic financial accounting concepts and issues including debits and credits, journal entries, and knowledge of the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows. This course will include insights into the fundamental strengths and limitations of the financial reporting process. This course covers the nature of the financial reporting process and the basic accounting principles, conventions, and concepts underlying the current reporting environment of GAAP basis financial statements. No prior knowledge of accounting is assumed. Cr 3.

MBA 504 Probability and Statistics for Business Decision Making
An introduction to the concepts and use of probability and statistics as tools for business decision making. Cr 3.

MBA 505 Financial Management
The primary objective of this course is to provide a balanced introduction to the theory and practice of financial management. Emphasis is placed on the management of capital to enhance shareholder wealth. Topics include time value of money, risk and return, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, and cost of capital. Prerequisites: MBA 501, MBA 502, MBA 504. Cr 3.

MBA 611 Introduction to Organizational Change
This course focuses on understanding the nature of organizational change. Process consulting forms the basis for much of the course. Prerequisite: EDU 671 or BUS 340. Cr 3.

MBA 612 Topics in International Business
This courses is taught by professors with different specialties and consists of two parts: (1) core topics that are included every time the course is taught, and (2) coverage of other topics in international business using either: (a) a multidisciplinary approach, (b) a legal approach, or (c) a marketing approach. Prerequisites: legal approach—none; multidisciplinary approach—MBA 501; marketing approach— MBA 660. Cr 3.

MBA 615 Ethical and Legal Issues in Business
This course examines business ethics and attempts to develop practical solutions to ethical issues that confront today’s global managers. This course also examines legal issues including such topics as drug testing in the workplace, an employee’s right to privacy, sexual harassment, and the rights and responsibilities of officers and directors. Cr 3.

MBA 623 Derivatives
This course explores the markets and valuation for options, futures, and swap contracts. Hedging and speculating techniques using derivatives are stressed. Financial engineering techniques are developed that can adjust the risk and return offered by traditional assets. Cash and carry, binomial option pricing, and the Black-Scholes option pricing models are covered. Topics include: Forward contracts, stock futures, interest rate futures, stock index futures, stock options, interest rate options, and various swap contracts. Prerequisite: MBA 505. Cr. 3.

MBA 625 International Finance
This course is intended to give students a solid introduction to the very important field of international finance. It offers a rigorous examination of and the financial management of the multinational corporation and of international financial markets. Intensive coverage of foreign exchange markets and methods of managing exchange rate risk are emphasized. Topics include currency derivative markets and risk management, arbitrage and international parity conditions, market efficiency, short- and long-term asset management, and capital budgeting. Prerequisite: MBA 505 or equivalent. Cr 3.

MBA 626 Strategic Valuation
This is the M.B.A. corporate finance course, focusing on strategic and quantitative analyses of complex, real asset investments. It prepares students for making investment decisions and evaluating investment decisions made by others. Topics include incremental cash flows, traditional capital budgeting, capital structure, required rates of return, real options, and valuation of business entities for purposes of acquisition or divestiture. Prerequisite: MBA 505. Cr 3.

MBA 627 Investment Management
An introduction to the various investment media and financial markets from the viewpoint of institutional investors. The course provides an in-depth analysis of the nature, problems, and process of evaluating securities and managing portfolios. Emphasis is placed on the structure of the securities markets, portfolio theory, and trading strategies of portfolio managers. Theoretical and empirical research addressing recent developments in portfolio management will be examined. Prerequisite: MBA 505. Cr 3.

MBA 629 Financial Modeling
Introduces principles and techniques for building financial models, in an uncertainty framework. Finance topics are drawn from a variety of areas: personal financial planning, investments, derivatives, and corporate finance. The course will integrate financial, accounting, and statistical concepts and techniques to construct financial models and to perform analyses using MS Excel. Emphasizes the application of financial modeling techniques in identifying and implementing business solutions. The course will be of special interest to students seeking more hands-on experience in constructing financial models. Prerequisite: MBA 505. Cr 3.

MBA 642 Leadership
The course integrates five perspectives of leadership: individual differences and diversity; transactional leadership; power and politics; transformational leadership; and the physical, psychological, and spiritual dimensions of leader well-being. Prerequisite: EDU 671 or BUS 340. Cr 3.

MBA 643 Creative Problem Solving
This course provides an applications-oriented understanding of the creative problem-solving process. Students will learn how to be more creative at the individual, group, and organizational levels. This course focuses on divergent and convergent creativity techniques together with various models of creativity. Prerequisite: EDU 671 or BUS 340. Cr 3.

MBA 644 Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation
Focuses on the strategic management of technology-based innovation in the firm. Specific topics include assessing the innovative capabilities of the firm, managing the corporate R&D function, managing the interfaces between functional groups in the development process, managing the new business development function in the firm, understanding and managing technical entrepreneurs, building technology-based distinctive competencies and competitive advantages, technological leadership versus followership in competitive strategy, institutionalizing innovation, and attracting and keeping corporate entrepreneurs. Prerequisite: EDU 671 or BUS 340. Cr 3.

MBA 646 Negotiation and Conflict Management
This course focuses on negotiation and conflict management theory and practice. Students are expected to develop negotiation and conflict management skills by participating in experiential exercises both inside and outside of class as well as to develop a personal negotiation and conflict management style designed to successfully meet the challenges of common conflict and negotiation situations. Cr 3.

MBA 647 Organizational Strategy
Using strategic tools such as competitive analysis and the value chain, this course provides an in-depth examination of the resource-based view of the firm. Emphasizes entrepreneurial strategy approaches in high-velocity business environments. Prerequisites: MBA 615 (or concurrent), MBA 505 and EDU 671 (or BUS 340). Cr 3.

MBA 649 Special Topics in Management: Introduction to System Dynamics
An examination of how the world can be understood through dynamic processes controlled by positive and negative feedback links. A general introduction to systems thinking that draws on system dynamics, a computer-based technique for modeling systematically created problems. Requires an understanding of algebra. Prerequisite: EDU 671 or BUS 340. Cr 3.

MBA 657 Triple Bottom-Line Marketing
How can marketers manage for the triple bottom line of financial, environmental, and social performance? This asynchronous, online course begins with an exploration of sustainable business (i.e., the pursuit of profits without causing pollution or social inequity). The course ends by examining green consumer behavior and the interrelationship between environmental issues and marketing strategy. Prerequisites: an introductory marketing class (BUS 260, or MBA 660) or instructor permission. Students will benefit if they have prior knowledge of economics (MBA 501) and cost accounting (ACC 211). Cr 3.

MBA 660 Managerial Marketing
This course has a decision-based perspective, relying heavily on the case approach. It focuses on the logical development of market-driven strategies and assessment of their impact on other marketing functions within the organization. Students will gain experience in analyzing complex market behavior, recommending changes in marketing strategy, and articulating the development, implementation, and control of marketing plans. Prerequisite: MBA 502. Cr 3.

MBA 665 Consumer Behavior
Examines three aspects of consumer behavior: 1) cultural, sociological, and psychological influences on consumer motivation; 2) consumer acquisition of product information and formation of attitudes; and 3) the process consumers use to make consumption decisions. Implications for marketing strategy and segmentation will be discussed and students will apply marketing research techniques to analyze consumer behavior. Prerequisite: basic marketing course or instructor permission. Cr 3.

MBA 669 Multivariate Methods for Marketing
This course focuses on the application of multivariate statistical methods in the development of marketing strategy and the investigation of marketing problems. Building of descriptive and predictive models using multi-dimensional techniques such as factor analysis, regression analysis, cluster analysis, analysis of variance, conjoint analysis, and perceptual mapping. Use of statistical packages. Prerequisite: MBA 504. Cr 3.

MBA 670 Management Science
This course examines the role, perspective, and commonly used tools of quantitative analysis in business decision making. Emphasis is placed on developing students’ abilities to recognize the need for quantification, to formulate business problems quantitatively, to select and test computer-based decision-support system models, to collect meaningful data, and to interpret the implications of analysis results. Prerequisite: MBA 504. Cr 3.

MBA 672 Supply Chain Management
This course examines supply chain concepts and current practice in the context of just-in-time production, total quality management, and continuous productivity improvement. Using practical applications, the focus is on the proactive management of movement and coordination of goods and services, and information, from raw material to end user through the value chain. Other topics include understanding the nature of demand for goods and services within business markets and the process of building relationships with suppliers. System-oriented managerial tools, models, and techniques are considered for their value-adding potential. Directed projects of the students’ choosing are used to address specific, company-based supply-chain problem situations. Prerequisites: MBA 670. Cr 3.

MBA 674 Topics in Information Systems Management
A topics course exploring major issues in the management of information technology. Students completing this course should have acquired an understanding of the strategic, tactical, and operational importance of information systems within an organization, and an understanding of how to leverage information technology in the management of an organization. Topics include, but are not limited to: strategic use of information technology, emerging technologies, systems development and project management, managing information systems resources, and knowledge management. Cr 3.

MBA 675 Production/Operations Management
An examination of the role of operations within manufacturing and service organizations. Emphasis is placed upon recognizing operational opportunities and tradeoffs, and employing computer simulation and other quantitative tools and decision support systems to assist strategic and operational decision making. Topics include: quality management, capacity management, process design, facility location, layout, production planning, and manufacturing philosophies such as group technology, the theory-of-constraints, and just-in-time. Prerequisite: MBA 670. Cr 3.

MBA 677 Information Visualization
In this course, students will learn to create charts, maps, and other visualizations to tell stories and to create effective graphical displays of evidence.  Students will learn to critically evaluate examples from print media and the internet after learning the foundations of information visualization.  Prerequisites: MBA 504. Spring only. Cr 3.

MBA 691 Independent Study
Selected topics in the areas of business and/or administration may be studied and researched on an independent basis. Enrollment is normally limited to M.B.A. degree candidates. Prerequisites: permission of the instructor and curriculum chair. Cr 1-3.

MBA 695 Internship
This internship education course is described in the preceding text. Prerequisites: completion of foundation courses, 3.0 GPA or higher, and permission of the instructor and curriculum chair. Enrollment is normally limited to M.B.A. majors who have not completed their degree requirements. A maximum of three credits of MBA 695 may be used toward the degree. Cr 1-3.

MBA 698 Practicum
This course is organized around projects provided by organizations in the southern Maine business community. Working with a faculty coach, teams of three to five MBA students work in organizations as consultants. The student teams analyze their assigned projects and recommend courses of action. Business leaders help with the identification of problems and evaluate the team’s analysis and recommendations. In addition, students attend discussion sessions designed to allow all the teams to discuss with and seek advice from other teams. This course is usually taken in a student’s final semester. Prerequisites: MBA 611, MBA 674, and any MBA marketing course. Cr 3.

MBA 699 Special Topics
Prerequisites vary. Cr 3.