Office of Educator Preparation

Professional Education Council

The Professional Education Council (PEC) is the entity charged by the university with unit accountability related to the management and coordination of all programs offered for initial, advanced and continuing preparation of educaors and othe PK-12 personnel, regardless of where these programs are administratively housed. The Maine Department of Education (Chapter 114) requires that all educator preparation programs be governed within  a single unit; the PEC meets this requirement by forging connections between multiple pathways among the four colleges at USM. 

The PEC has three major purposes: (a) to promote accountability and consistency across all programs and pathways vis-a-vis the conceptual framework, the assessment system and the capacity of the unit and its component parts to carry out all programs and pathways with integrity and high standards; (b) to review and approve policies and procedures, major curriculum changes, and evaluation studies related to initial and advanced educator certification and continuing preparation of educators and other PK-12 personnel at the University of Southern Maine; and (c) to provide a forum for communication and coordination between and among initial and advanced programs leading to professional credentials for K-12 schools. Chaired by the Director of Education Preparation, the Council is composed of the faculty coordinators for each program or pathway and administrators from each college having educator preparation programs. The Council meets as needed but at least three times annually.

Unit Documents for the Governance, Assessment & Conceptual Framework Docs

Governance Structure

 

PREAMBLE

            This constitution provides for the governance of the USM Professional Education Council (PEC), the officially recognized administrative unit for all initial and advanced educator preparation programs and pathways in the four colleges of the University of Southern Maine. The document establishes and clarifies the roles and responsibilities of the Director of Professional Education, the Deans, faculty leaders, councils, and committees for creating consistent operations and maintaining high quality programming and accountability procedures for educator preparation at the University. Additional operating details and procedures are found in the appendices. Nothing within this constitution shall be construed as granting to the administrators, faculty, students, professional staff, classified staff, or any governance body the authority to act outside the policies and approved governance documents of the University of Southern Maine.  

 

 

ARTICLE I: DESCRIPTION

The Professional Education Council is the entity charged by the university with unit accountability related to the management and coordination of all programs offered for initial, advanced, and continuing preparation of educators and other PK-12 personnel, regardless of where these programs are administratively housed. The Maine Department of Education (Chapter 114) requires that all educator preparation programs be governed within a single unit; the PEC meets this requirement by forging connections between multiple pathways among the four colleges at USM. The PEC has three major purposes: (a) to promote accountability and consistency across all programs and pathways vis-a-vis the conceptual framework, the assessment system, and the capacity of the unit and its component parts to carry out all programs and pathways with integrity and high standards; (b) to review and approve policies and procedures, major curriculum changes, and evaluation studies related to initial and advanced educator certification and continuing preparation of educators and other PK-12 personnel at the University of Southern Maine; and (c) to provide a forum for communication and coordination between and among initial and advanced programs leading to professional credentials for K-12 schools. Chaired by the Director of Education Preparation, the Council is composed of the faculty coordinators for each program or pathway and administrators from each college having educator preparation programs. The Council meets as needed but at least three times annually. 

ARTICLE II: DEFINITIONS AND ORIGINATION

Section 1

 

Name.  The official name of the unit is the Professional Education Council (PEC).

 

Section 2

 

Definitions. 

The following definitions apply to the governance operations of the USM Professional Education Council.  (See complex glossary of definitions from Chapter 114 of the State of Maine statutes in Appendix A.)

 

Unit:   According to the Maine Department of Education, the UNIT is defined as either:

 

(A) The entity within a four-year and/or graduate level higher education institution charged by the higher education institution for managing or coordinating all programs offered for initial and continuing preparation of educators and other PK-12 personnel, regardless of where these programs are administratively housed. This entity is also known as the professional education unit.

 

(B)  A separate entity created by a formal partnership between one or more accredited four-year or graduate level higher education institution(s) approved by the state for initial certification of teachers, and one or more recognized PK-12 school administrative units or state-approved PK-12 private schools for the purpose managing or coordinating a program limited to preparing new teachers-of-record in PK-12 schools who have a degree but lack prior eligibility for initial certification through an alternate (non-traditional preparation) route. (See definition for Alternate Route Program and Section 1.2.19 21 Alternate Route Programs).

 

Unit Head:  The individual officially designated to provide leadership for the unit (e.g., dean, director or chair), with the authority and responsibility for its overall administration and operation. (Chapter 114)

 

Initial Program:  The program that when completed qualifies an individual for his or her first certification as a P-12 teacher. A program that prepares candidates at the baccalaureate or post-baccalaureate level for their first certification as a PK-12 teacher, specialist, or school leader. (Chapter 114)

 

Advanced Program: A professional education program leading to certification offered at a level other than for P-12 provisional or professional teacher or administrator certification at the post-baccalaureate level designed for the continuing education of teachers who have previously completed an initial preparation program or for the preparation of other school personnel. Advanced preparation programs award graduate credit at the masters, specialist, and doctoral degree levels as well as non-degree licensure programs offered at the graduate level.  (Chapter 114)

 

Pathway: The avenue by which USM students obtain teacher education instruction and field

experiences connected to an academic major in (a) content area(s).

 

Authority: Responsibility for decision-making and approval of specific actions related to

professional educator preparation.  The specific areas of authority granted to the PEC must be

spelled out in the governance document and approved by the Provost and Vice-President for

Academic Affairs. The vote of PEC members will have binding authority (with the approval of

administration) for policies and procedures that promote consistent delivery of initial and

advanced educator preparation certification programs and accountability reporting systems

across the University, in accordance with the expectations of Chapter 114 of the Maine

Department of Education guidelines.

 

Advisory Role:  A formal process of communicating and educating USM administrators about

priorities, needs, concerns, and expectations for educator preparation programs at USM.

 

Office of Education Preparation:  The officially recognized administrative office for

coordinating and managing all functions related to the approval, oversight, and accountability

functions for educator preparation programs and pathways at USM.

 

 

ARTICLE III: ORGANIZATION, OPERATIONAL STRUCTURE, AND BYLAWS

 

  1. Membership: Voting members include one faculty member from each academic program/pathway at USM offering an initial or advanced level educator preparation program, one administrator from each college, the SEHD Placement & Certification Coordinator, and the Director of Educator Preparation.

 (Full membership is listed in Appendix B; the list is to be annually updated.)

 

B.         Leadership: The Director of Education Preparation is the designated unit head (see definition) for education preparation at the University of Southern Maine, shall chair the Professional Education Council, and will be a voting member of the council.  Subcommittee leadership may be assigned on an ad hoc basis. 

 

C.        Council Responsibilities: Provide leadership and advocacy for all initial and advanced-level education programs; review and provide guidance on education program approval and accreditation and credentialing issues; create uniform policies and procedures for operating initial level education programs at USM; develop consistent data collection, assessment, and accountability reporting systems that assist in the annual review of evaluation data and foster consistency and administrative integrity for all educator preparation programs; coordinate curricula and course blueprints within and among education programs/pathways to ensure consistency with the conceptual framework and alignment with Maine Department of Education mandates; provide a forum for communication among all areas of the University and the public school community directly concerned with educator preparation; and make recommendations to the Deans and/or Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs for approval of all initial-level and advanced education programs at USM.

 

The primary roles of the PEC are to facilitate communication among professional education programs and pathways and serve in an advisory capacity to the USM administration. In addition, the vote of PEC members will have binding authority (with the approval of administration) for policies and procedures that promote consistent delivery of initial and advanced educator preparation certification programs and accountability reporting systems across the University, in accordance with the expectations of Chapter 114 of the Maine Department of Education guidelines.

 

D.        Curriculum Decisions: The level of administrative authority for curriculum decisions rests in the academic programs for program-specific standards, content, instruction, and unique assessments. The PEC maintains authority for curriculum decisions related to accreditation and educator preparation program/pathway approval requirements, shared assessments, unit accountability and reporting systems, uniform policies and procedures, uniform fees, and coordinated/inter-program course delivery. See Appendix C for the Program/Pathway Proposal Form that must be submitted to the Director of Professional Education at least two weeks before the PEC meeting at which the proposal is to be considered.

           

E.         Procedural Operations: Meetings will include both formal business and discussions. A modified (user-friendly) Robert’s Rules of Order will be used for conducting the formal business of the Professional Education Council. Approval actions and motions require a simple majority, assuming a 2/3 quorum is present (written proxies are appropriate for meeting quorum numbers for voting). Agendas and minutes will be publicly available. Guests are welcome but will not have voting privileges. Sub-committee work may be used to develop proposals and working documents that need to be brought to the attention of the Council. Executive sessions may be called for significant issues that require the focused attention of PEC voting members after a public forum.

 

ARTICLE IV: LEADERSHIP & ADMINISTRATION

 

Director of Education Preparation. 

A.        Responsibilities: The Director of Education Preparation is the designated unit head for overseeing and administering all initial, advanced, and continuing professional educator preparation programs at the University of Southern Maine, including all four colleges and all three campuses. The Director of Education Preparation will work in close collaboration with the Deans, department chairs and program coordinators, associated faculty, and staff to create consistent policies, procedures, accountability, and reporting systems that connect and unify all educator preparation programs under a common unit framework. The Director’s responsibilities include coordination of the unit’s work in the following areas related to educator preparation:  development and implementation of governance, policies, and procedures; collaboration among unit educator preparation personnel; general oversight and coordination related to the unit’s accredited/approved programs; University accountability procedures; data collection and information dissemination; regular communication with all stakeholders in educator preparation at USM; representing Educator Preparation at University events; and assuming a leadership and decision-making role for issues related to educator preparation at USM.

  1. Selection: The Director of Education Preparation will hold tenure and faculty rank. Faculty will be invited to apply for the position when a vacancy occurs.

C.        Term: The Director of Education Preparation is typically appointed to an 11-month contract by the Dean of the College of Management and Human Service (CMHS) for a two-year term, with the approval of the Chief Academic Officer. The appointment may be renewed for subsequent two-year terms.

D.        Evaluation: The CMHS Dean shall conduct a review of the Director of Education Preparation at least once every two years. 

 

APPENDIX A: Official Maine Department of Education (Chapter 114)

DEFINITIONS pertaining to Educator Preparation

 

 

The following definitions refer to the specific use of terms in Chapter 114 (PURPOSE, STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES FOR THE REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF PREPARATION PROGRAMS FOR EDUCATION PERSONNEL) only as they relate to the program review and approval process for certification of education personnel.

 

Accreditation:  A process for assessing and enhancing academic and educational quality through voluntary peer review; also the decision rendered by an accrediting agency when an institution/agency or professional education unit meets its standards and requirements.

 

Accredited: When an educational institution meets required standards or accepted criteria of quality in its educational program as established by a regional or national accrediting agency that is recognized by the US Secretary of Education.

 

Advanced Program: A professional education program leading to certification offered at a level other than for P-12 provisional or professional teacher or administrator certification at the post-baccalaureate level designed for the continuing education of teachers who have previously completed an initial preparation program or for the preparation of other school personnel. Advanced preparation programs award graduate credit at the masters, specialist, and doctoral degree levels as well as non-degree licensure programs offered at the graduate level.

 

Approved Program: A professional education program developed and offered by a unit that includes a Maine college or university that has been assessed by a review team utilizing the standards contained within Chapter 114 and authorized by the Maine State Board of Education to prepare PK-12 educators.  (See definition of “unit” below).

 

Assessment System:  A comprehensive and integrated set of evaluation measures that provide information for use in monitoring candidate performance and managing and improving unit operations and programs for the preparation of professional educators.

 

Basic Skills Assessment: Before a traditional or non-traditional student can be admitted to candidacy status in a state approved teacher education program, he/she must take and successfully pass the rigorous basic skills assessment as defined by the Maine State Board of Education.  

 

CAEP: Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) is the national professional accrediting body for educator preparation programs.

 

Candidacy Status: The designation assigned to a student who has taken and successfully passed the PRAXIS I exam or its equivalent, rigorous basic skills assessment as defined by the Maine State Board of Education, and any other institutional benchmarks.

 

Candidates: Individuals admitted to, or enrolled in, programs for the initial or advanced preparation of teachers, teachers continuing their professional development, or other professional school personnel. Candidates are distinguished from “students” in PK-12 schools.

 

Candidate Performance Data: Information derived from assessments of candidate proficiencies in areas of teaching and effects on student learning, candidate knowledge and dispositions. Candidate performance data may be derived from a wide variety of sources, such as projects, essays or tests demonstrating subject content mastery, employer evaluations, state licensure tests and mentoring year “portfolios,” as well as assessments, projects, reflections, clinical observations and other evidence of pedagogical and professional teaching proficiencies.

 

Clinical Experiences: Direct experiences for candidates in PK-12 schools, including field experiences, prior to student teaching or internship; internships for preparation programs other than teacher preparation; and student teaching. 

 

Conceptual Framework: A conceptual framework(s) establishes the shared vision for a unit’s efforts in preparing educators to work in PK-12 schools. It provides direction for programs, courses, teaching, candidate performance, scholarship, service, and unit accountability. The conceptual framework(s) is knowledge-based, articulated, widely shared, coherent, consistent with the unit and/or unit mission, and continuously evaluated. The conceptual framework(s) provides the unit’s intellectual philosophy.

 

Content Knowledge: Understanding of the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of a subject area.

 

Dispositions:  The values, commitments and professional ethics that influence behaviors toward students, families, colleagues, and communities and affect student learning, motivation, and development as well as the educator’s own professional growth. Dispositions are guided by beliefs and attitudes related to values such as caring, fairness, honesty, responsibility, and social justice.

 

Diversity: Differences among groups of people and individuals based on age, race, culture, ethnicity, experiences, socioeconomic status, gender, language, exceptionalities, religion, sexual orientation, learning style, and geographic region in which they live.

 

Educator: A person involved in PK-12 education that requires certification including, but not limited to teachers, administrators and specialists; or 2) a person in a higher education institution with responsibility for educator preparation programs.

 

Education Personnel: Persons employed in PK-12 educational settings in an instructional or instructional support capacity requiring certification or authorization in accordance with the provisions of Maine Department of Education Regulation Chapter 115.

 

Faculty: Professional education faculty members who are employed by higher education units and PK-12 school faculty who supervise clinical practice.

 

Field Experiences: A variety of early and on-going field-based opportunities in which candidates may observe, assist, tutor, instruct, and/or conduct research. Field experiences may occur in off-campus settings such as schools, community centers or homeless shelters that are designed to permit pre-service candidates to engage in observation of teachers in a classroom setting and to assume progressive levels of teaching responsibility that shall take place prior to the culminating student teaching experience. 

 

General Education Program: The component of the college or university baccalaureate degree program that emphasizes the study of the behavioral and social sciences, fine arts, humanities, natural sciences, and mathematics.

 

Governance: The system and structure for defining policy, providing leadership, and managing and coordinating the procedures and resources that ensure the quality of all school personnel prepared at the unit.

 

Higher Education Institution: An accredited institution approved by the state to grant baccalaureate and/or graduate degrees that offers programs for the professional preparation of educators.

 

Indicators:  A knowledge, skill or ability used to demonstrate mastery of a designated standard.  The operational definitions that define the evidence that professional education programs will provide to demonstrate that a standard is met.

 

Initial Program: The program that when completed qualifies an individual for his or her first certification as a P-12 teacher.  A program that prepares candidates at the baccalaureate or post-baccalaureate level for their first certification as a PK-12 teacher, specialist, or school leader.

 

InTASC: The Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) is a project of the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) that has developed model performance-based standards and assessments for the certification of teachers which are known as the “Common Core Teaching Standards”.

 

ISLLC: Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium, a source of national standards for school administrators developed by the Council of Chief School Officers (CCSSO).

 

Institutional Standards: Candidate knowledge, skills and dispositions identified by the institution to reflect its mission and the unit’s conceptual framework.

 

Knowledge Bases: The research and theoretical bases upon which a program of study in professional education is founded. Examples might include: empirical research; action research; disciplined inquiry, and informed theory.

 

Major: A field of study in which a candidate completes an academic specialization as part of an approved program leading to certification.

 

Minor: A field of study in which a candidate completes an academic specialization as part of an approved program leading to certification in addition to the major.

 

NETS: The National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) are a set of standards published by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) for the purpose of leveraging the use of technology in K-12 education. There are three groupings: NETS.S – student technology standards; NETS.T – teacher technology standards; and NETS.A – Administrator technology standards.

 

NCATE: The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) is a national professional accrediting body for educator preparation programs.

 

          Non-Traditional Teacher Preparation Paths: Alternate teacher preparation paths which prepare individuals with a minimum of a four-year bachelor’s degree, or a verifiable equivalent, in a content field that supports the academic content knowledge of the content field for which the individual is seeking initial teacher certification, but whose undergraduate or graduate work did not include pedagogical knowledge and skills.Alternate teacher preparation path candidates will not have held an initial teaching certificate before.

 

Non-Traditional Preparation Path Provider: Any Maine State Board of Education approved professional education unit that accommodates the preparation needs of alternate route teacher candidates and supervises their instruction as they seek to acquire the necessary pedagogical skills to qualify for initial teacher certification.

 

Pedagogical Content Knowledge: An integration of teacher understanding that combines content (subject matter), pedagogy (instructional methods), and learner characteristics (cultural backgrounds, prior knowledge, and experiences) – in its simplest form, it is the knowledge of how to teach a subject.

 

Pedagogical Knowledge: An understanding of learning, human development, professional ethics, motivational techniques, cultural and individual differences, instructional strategies, classroom management, and assessment strategies that have an impact on the learner designed to have a positive impact on learners.

 

Performance Assessment: A comprehensive assessment through which candidates demonstrate their proficiencies in subject, professional and pedagogical knowledge, and skills including their abilities to have positive effects on student learning.

 

Performance-Based Program:  A professional preparation program that systematically gathers, analyzes, and uses data for self-improvement and candidate advisement; especially data that demonstrate candidate proficiencies, including positive effects on student learning (also referred to as Proficiency-Based Program).

 

Performance Criteria: Descriptions or rubrics that specify qualities or levels of candidate proficiency and are used to evaluate candidate performance.

Practicum: A supervised experience in a school, clinic or other setting which provides practical applications of theory and experience for candidates in approved programs is designed especially for the preparation of education candidates that involves the practical application of previously studied theory under the supervision of professional education faculty. When referring to more than one practicum the word practica is used.

 

Pre-Candidacy Status: The pre-admission status of a traditional or non-traditional student who is admitted to a state approved teacher education program but has not yet taken and passed the required rigorous basic skills assessment as defined by the Maine State Board of Education.

 

Preparation Program: A series or combination of courses, related instructional services and practica, internship or other student experience designed to meet the academic and professional requirements necessary to establish eligibility for certification as a teacher, administrator or educational specialist.

 

Professional Education Faculty:  Those individuals who teach one or more courses designed to meet essential competencies for certification endorsement areas as well as provide services to education candidates (e.g., advising or supervising student teaching) or administer some portion of the education program. 

 

Professional Educator:  A person qualified to hold a PK-12 certificate as a teacher, administrator or a specialist as defined in Maine Department of Education Regulation Chapter 115 and who demonstrates, through performance, the knowledge, skills, and abilities to improve student learning.

 

Proficiencies: Required knowledge, skills and dispositions identified in the professional, state, national, or institutional standards.

 

Proficiency-Based Program:A professional preparation program that systematically gathers, analyzes, and uses data for self-improvement and candidate advisement; especially data that demonstrate candidate proficiencies, including positive effects on student learning (also referred to as Performance-Based Program). 

 

Program Approval Process:  Process by which a state governmental agency reviews a professional education program to determine if it meets the state’s standards for the preparation of school personnel. A process for assessing and enhancing academic and education quality through peer review, to assure the public that a professional education unit and/or program has met the state’s standards for the preparation of school personnel.

 

Program Completer:  A candidate who, by successfully completing all of a state approved educator preparation program’s requirements, has qualified for a recommendation for certification.

 

Review Team: A team of educators recommended to the State Board of Education by the Commissioner for the tasks of: visiting the unit seeking program approval or renewal; applying the program standards against the information gathered and submitted by the unit; and making a recommendation to the State Board, through the Commissioner, as to whether the unit has successfully met, or continues to meet the standards for program approval.

 

Rubrics: Criteria for judging performance that indicate the qualities by which levels of performance can be differentiated, and that anchor judgments about the degree of proficiency on a given standard. In a standards-based system the rubric (or scale) is used at each level of content and for each reporting or measurement topic.

 

Scholarship:  Systematic inquiry into the areas related to teaching, learning and the education of teachers and other school personnel. Scholarship includes traditional research and publication as well as the rigorous and systematic study of pedagogy and the application of current research findings in new settings. Scholarship further presupposes submission of one’s work for professional review and evaluation.

 

School:  An institution serving any of the grades pre-kindergarten through 12 PK-12.

 

Self-Assessment: The unit’s information and data showing how it has met the six program standards. The self-assessment document may also include other relevant information and data as may be necessary to support the program’s request for approval or renewal.

 

Semester Hour:  15 contact hours or the equivalent spent in an approved preparation program or in a course offered by an accredited institution of higher education.

 

Standard: A standard is a candidate proficiency norm or a unit requirement to be met by candidates during the implementation of preparation programs for education personnel.

 

Standards-Based System:  A performance-based system that is centered around a defined number of learning levels; where students advance through the system by demonstrating proficiency at each level; where standards are used to guide the curriculum; where student progress is measured and used to determine advancement;where students advance through the system at their own pace; and where learning is the constant and time is the variable. Such systems may also be referred to as Performance-Based or Proficiency-Based.

Student Teaching: Classroom practice. A clinical practice or internship that provides candidates with an intensive and extensive culminating activity through observation, participation, and actual teaching, under the direction of a college or university supervisor of student teachers and by a cooperating teacher as a part of the professional education program offered by an institution with an approved educator preparation program candidates are immersed in the learning community and provided opportunities to develop and demonstrate competence in the professional roles for which they are preparing.

 

TEAC: The Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) is a national professional accrediting body for educator preparation programs.

 

Teacher: An individual who is eligible for employment as a member of a PK-12 school’s professional staff with responsibility for planning, delivering and evaluating instruction which is primarily delivered in a classroom or vocational setting; but, this definition does not include the educational specialist.

 

Teacher of Record:  A person employedby a School Administrative Unit (SAU) or an approved private school who is issued a standard contract for teachers and has been so identified in the SAU’s or approved private school’s staff information system as required by the Maine Department of Education is responsible for a specified proportion of a student’s learning activities that are within a subject or course and are aligned to performance measures.

 

Technology Education:  The study of technology which provides an opportunity for students to learn about the processes and knowledge related to technology that are needed to solve problems.

 

Technology, Use of:  What candidates must know and understand about information technology in order to use it in working effectively with students and professional colleagues in the (1) delivery, development, prescription and assessment of instruction; (2) problem solving; (3) school and classroom administration; (4) educational research; (5) electronic information access and exchange; and (6) personal and professional productivity.

 

Unit:   For the purposes of this chapter, a unit must meet either definition A or B:

 

(A)   The entity within a four-year and/or graduate level higher education institution charged by the higher education institution for managing or coordinating all programs offered for initial and continuing preparation of educators and other PK-12 personnel, regardless of where these programs are administratively housed. This entity is also known as the professional education unit.

 

(B)  A separate entity created by a formal partnership between one or more accredited  

four-year or graduate level higher education institution(s) approved by the state for initial certification of teachers, and one or more recognized PK-12 school administrative units or state-approved PK-12 private schools for the purpose managing or coordinating a program limited to preparing new teachers-of-record in PK-12 schools who have a degree but lack prior eligibility for initial certification through an alternate (non-traditional preparation) route. (See definition for Alternate Route Program and Section 1.2.19 21 Alternate Route Programs).

 

Unit Head:  The individual officially designated to provide leadership for the unit (e.g., dean, director or chair), with the authority and responsibility for its overall administration and operation.

 

 

 

 

 

APPENDIX B:  Current Membership in the USM Professional Education Council

 

Undergraduate pathways leading to initial teacher certification include the following concentrations in content area majors at USM in 2013:

 

Concentration in Elementary Education, English major

Concentration in Secondary Education, English major

Concentration in Elementary Education, History major

Concentration in Secondary Education, History major

Concentration in Elementary Education, Geography-Anthropology major

Concentration in Secondary Education, Geography-Anthropology major

Concentration in Secondary Education, Math major

Concentration in K-12 Education, Music major

Concentration in K-12 Education, Studio Arts major

Concentration in K-12 Education, French major

Concentration in K-12 Education, Hispanic Studies major

Concentration in K-12 Education, Classics major

Concentration in Elementary Education, Arts and Humanities major

Concentration in Secondary Education, Arts and Humanities major

Concentration in Elementary Education, Natural and Applied Science major

Concentration in Secondary Education, Natural and Applied Science major

Concentration in Early Childhood Education, Social and Behavioral Sciences major

 

Graduate–level programs leading to initial teacher certification, advanced endorsements, and licensure in 2013 include the following:

  • Abilities and Disabilities Studies
    • Teaching Students with Mild to Severe Disabilities Concentration
  • Counselor Education
    • Clinical Mental Health Counseling (LCPC) (Licensure)*
    • Rehabilitation Counseling (CRC) (Licensure)*
    • School Counseling, K-12
  • Early Childhood
    • Montessori Early Childhood Teacher Education Program
  • Educational Leadership
    • Assistant Principal
    • Athletic Administration
    • Curriculum Coordinator
    • School Administration
    • Special Education Administration
  • Extended Teacher Education Program (ETEP)
    • K-8 General Elementary Teacher Education
    • Secondary Teacher Certification, 7-12, (English, Foreign Language, Math, Science, Social Studies)
  • Literacy, Language, and Culture
    • K-12 Literacy Specialist
    • ESL Endorsement
  • School Psychology (Licensure)

 

*Note: Clinical Mental Health and Rehabilitation Counseling are listed since they are licensure pathways with in the Counseling Program and share key program assessments. Only the School Counselor pathway falls within the Unit for program approval purposes.  

 

APPENDIX C:  Program/Pathway Proposal Form

 

USM TEACHER EDUCATION PATHWAY PROPOSAL FORM

 

  1. Name of Program/Department proposing pathway: ___________________________
  2. Faculty Sponsor: ______________________________________________________
  3. Date Submitted: ________________  Proposed Start Date: ____________________
  4. What other stakeholders have been involved in the development of this proposal?

 

  1. Briefly describe the proposed pathway:

 

 

  1. What is the rationale for developing this pathway?

 

 

  1. What is the relation of this proposed pathway to the USM Conceptual Framework and Assessment System for Educator Preparation programs and pathways at USM?

 

  1. Has this proposal been vetted and approved by the program/department offering the pathway?    ___ Yes      ___ No
  2. Please attach the draft curricular outline for the pathway
     
  3. Are other resources needed to offer the pathway?   ___ Yes       ___ No

If yes, please describe?

 

 

  1. What is the plan for coordinating and delivering the field components of the pathway?

 

 

 

 

Submit to the Director of Educator Preparation, 8 Bailey Hall