Department of Exercise, Health, and Sport Sciences

Course Descriptions


Undergraduate

Course Fees

Each SPM laboratory and clinical course offering has a fee ranging from $20 to $150. A course fee is assessed in REC 216 Emergency Response, REC 218 Emergency Medical Response with Focus on Wilderness Application, REC 233 Outdoor Recreation, REC 367 Adventure Based Counseling, and select RHF courses.

REC 110 Foundations of Recreation and Leisure Studies
This course addresses the concepts of leisure, play, and recreation, emphasizing the role that leisure should play in modern society. Lectures and discussions on societal attitudes toward work and leisure stress the need to keep these activities in proper perspective. Students will concentrate on psychological aspects of optimal experience and quality of life. Community leisure services will be addressed. Assignments will encourage students to explore leisure lifestyle attitudes. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will begin their academic career portfolios. Offered fall, spring, and summer. Cr 3. 

REC 121 Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation Services
An overview of therapeutic recreation, including historical and philosophical foundations, service models, professional functions, and service settings. The psychology of disability will be included as well as an introduction to disabling conditions. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisite: therapeutic recreation major or permission of instructor. Offered spring. Cr 3. 

REC 190 Yoga and Nutrition
A recipe for transformation through yoga, meditation, and healthy nutrition. This course combines mindful eating with in-depth reflection for personal education, stress release, and body movements to create a balanced life. Offered fall and spring. Cr 3.

REC 216 Emergency Response
This course covers topics prescribed by the American Red Cross in their emergency response course, including respiratory and cardiac emergencies, wounds, poisoning, sudden illness, burns, and other topics. Successful completion of course requirements will lead to Emergency Response certification, including adult, child, and infant CPR, from the American Red Cross. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisites: therapeutic recreation major and junior or senior status. Offered fall, spring, and summer. Cr 3. 

REC 218 Emergency Medical Response with Focus on Wilderness Application
This course prepares students to stabilize and care for victims of medical emergencies in remote and wilderness area settings when advanced medical professionals are not readily available. The course is required for students enrolled in the nature tourism minor. Students who successfully complete the course will qualify for certification by the American Red Cross in Wilderness Emergency Response and CPR for the Professional Rescuer. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Offered fall. Cr 3.

REC 219 Lifetime Physical Fitness and Wellness
The primary emphasis of this course is to teach students how to take control of their personal health and lifestyle habits. Major areas will include nutrition/weight management, fitness training techniques, flexibility, coronary risk factor management, muscular strength/endurance, stress management, and other wellness-related topics. Class content will include readings, discussions, self-assessment activities, and development of personalized nutrition and physical activity plans. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Equivalent to SPM 219. Offered fall, spring, and summer. Cr 3. 

REC 223 Introduction to Nature Tourism
This course covers the basics of nature tourism, a broad category that includes ecotourism, adventure tourism, and a variety of activities and programs involving the outdoors. An emphasis is placed on Maine and northern New England nature tourism. REC 223 is required for the nature tourism minor. Offered spring. Cr 3. 

REC 226 Lifetime Leisure Activities
Through participation in a variety of recreational pursuits, students will explore the rules, techniques, strategies, and adaptations for successful participation by those individuals with disabilities. Youth sport development, leadership techniques for teaching physical recreation activities, and basic motor learning concepts will also be addressed. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Offered spring. Cr 3.  

REC 231 Expressive Arts Programming
Students will learn about the therapeutic benefits of the arts and how to plan, adapt, organize, and lead arts based programming and activities. The course will require students to participate in a variety of fine arts activities such as collage, painting, poetry, book making, storytelling and other appropriate projects. No prior art knowledge needed. Offered fall and spring. Cr 3. 

REC 232 Methods in Therapeutic Recreation Program Design
Using a systems approach to therapeutic recreation program development, students will learn how to develop group-oriented treatment and educational programs. Leisure assessment, documentation, and individualized treatment plan development will be introduced. Students will be required to meet together outside of class to work on group program development projects. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisite: REC 121 or permission of instructor. Offered fall. Cr 3. 

REC 233 Outdoor Recreation
This course focuses on safe, sustainable, nature-based recreation with an emphasis on "leave no trace" principles. The role of park systems and wilderness environments relative to recreation in modern society will be examined. A variety of outdoor recreation activities will be introduced. Several class trips will be required. Offered fall. Cr 3. 

REC 241 Recreation Leadership
This course provides students with the basic knowledge and methods necessary for effective leadership in recreation settings. Students will be required to participate in projects, presentations, and discussions that are aimed at helping them to develop and analyze leadership skills in a variety of recreation program areas such as special events, expressive arts, passive recreation, outdoor recreation, and sports. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Offered fall. Cr 3. 

REC 253 Implications of Disabling Conditions for Therapeutic Recreation
This course provides an overview of physical and developmental disabilities with emphasis on etiology, clinical descriptors, rehabilitation, and educational concerns. Examination of the impact of disability on leisure and therapeutic recreation programming will be addressed, as will barriers that affect communication and interactions between persons with and without disabilities.  Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Offered fall. Cr 3.

REC 285 Perspectives on Animal-Assisted Therapy
This course explores the human-animal bond in contemporary society with a special emphasis on understanding the role animals can play in the physical, psychological, and rehabilitation of persons with a variety of disabilities. In addition, the course will demonstrate how animals can benefit community health at large. Students will gain a real-world view of animal-assisted therapy through engaging with invited guest speakers, conducting a site visit, and creating a group program intervention. Additional topics to support content include animal behavior, roles that animals play in disaster relief and in the criminal justice system, and how an appreciation of wildlife habitats can be therapeutic for all audiences. Students from many fields will find this course useful to future careers in Recreation and Leisure, Nursing, Health Sciences, Occupational Therapy, Social Work, Psychology, Biology, Criminology, Teacher Education, and anyone with a strong interest in companion animals. Offered fall and spring. Cr 3.

REC 311 Psychosocial Interventions for Older Adults
This course will explore the normal aging process in addition to a variety of chronic conditions experienced by older adults. The focus of the course will be on nonpharmacological intervention strategies for older adults residing in community and clinical agencies. Intervention examples include stress management, animal-assisted therapy, storytelling, autobiographical writing, bibliotherapy, adventure-based activities, air mat therapy, and "simple pleasures" activities. Other topics of study will include attitudes, stereotypes, and social issues that affect older adults today. Off-campus service learning experiences will be expected along with in-class discussions. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Offered spring. Cr 3. 

REC 314 Wellness Education and Counseling
This course is designed to facilitate an understanding of how to plan, implement, and evaluate wellness education programs. Teaching and learning styles will be addressed. Counseling skills will be practiced. Teaching techniques and tips will be highlighted. The course follows a learning-by-doing and reflection-in-action approach to education. Students will participate in experiential group and individual processes and be expected to apply personal insight when working with others. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Offered spring. Cr 3. 

REC 324 Inclusive and Special Recreation
This course will explore how to include persons with disabilities into non-treatment focused recreation programs and services. Disability awareness and history plus physical and program access will be explored with a focus on requirements specified by federal ADA legislation. Recreation and sport organizations for persons with disabilities as well as assistive devices that enable access will also be examined. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisites: REC 110, REC 253, or permission of instructor. Offered fall. Cr 3. 

REC 367 Adventure Based Counseling
The course focuses on how to facilitate and then process outdoor, adventure, and recreation activities as a means to improve self-concepts, develop group cohesion and uncover feelings, among others. Course objectives will be met through experiential as well as theoretical methods, thus allowing the student to acquire the skills necessary to lead groups through similar activities. Class format will be lectures, discussions, group activities, field trips, and presentations by class members. The course will address how to plan, implement, lead, debrief, and evaluate adventure experiences. Offered spring. Cr 3. 

REC 382 Assessment and Documentation in Therapeutic Recreation
This course examines therapeutic recreation services in a variety of settings. Emphasis will be on assessment and documentation within healthcare settings. Students will learn assessment, individual treatment planning, intervention strategies, and the development of treatment protocols. Students will be required to work in groups and participate in class leadership. A 24-hour practicum experience in a therapeutic recreation program is required. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisites: Recreation and Leisure Studies major or Recreation Leadership minor, REC 232, and HRD/SBS 200. Offered fall. Cr 3. 

REC 383 Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation
Exploration of the processes and techniques used in Therapeutic Recreation practice. A focus on evidence-based practice and practice-based evidence will facilitate the learning of various recreation and leisure activities, modalities, and interventions. Therapeutic Recreation processes, approaches, leadership roles and tasks, communication skills, and therapeutic relationships will be addressed. A 24-hour clinical practicum is required. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisites: REC 232 and REC 382. Offered spring. Cr 3. 

REC 386 Recreation Facility Design and Maintenance
This course presents a comprehensive introduction to the field of design management and maintenance for future recreation and leisure service professionals. It offers a detailed look at the foundations of the profession, including defining characteristics of recreation facility management and descriptions of the duties of a recreation facility manager and areas within the facilities. The course also covers common indoor and outdoor elements of facilities, including sites, spaces, lighting, surfaces, utilities, landscaping, walkways, and parking areas. Offered fall. Cr 3. 

REC 390 Topics in Recreation and Leisure Studies
This course includes topic areas in recreation and leisure studies not already covered by regular course offerings . May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Cr 3. 

REC 398 Independent Study
This course is open only to students majoring or minoring within the program who have identified a topic, relevant to their course of study, that they want to study in depth and for which there is no existing appropriate course. Students must obtain a faculty supervisor and negotiate a written independent study contract with this person. Independent study forms can be obtained from the program. Cr 1-3.

REC 494 Professional Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation Practice
This course will prepare students for an extended internship experience. Students will complete all tasks necessary to secure an internship placement. Serious study and discussion of topics such as professional conduct, ethics, safety, and risk management will be required. This course must be taken immediately prior to REC 495 Internship. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisites: All REC core courses and permission of instructor. Offered spring. Cr 3. 

REC 495 Internship
Students are required to work a minimum of 560 hours in an agency that provides therapeutic recreation services. During this period students will apply the knowledge, methods, and leadership techniques that they have learned in academic courses. Students will be directly supervised by qualified agency personnel and indirectly supervised by faculty. This course is taken in the senior year. Health insurance is required. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisites: All required REC courses, REC 494 and permission of instructor. Offered fall. Cr 12. 

REC 498 Management and Professional Development in Therapeutic Recreation
An overview of management roles in therapeutic recreation settings with major focus on comprehensive program development, supervision of professional and volunteer personnel, policy and strategy development, and quality assurance. Each student is required to develop a comprehensive program and policy manual. Students will apply the information learned during internships to course assignments and discussions. This course culminates in convening a professional conference for Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialists. Recreation and Leisure Studies majors will include this class in their academic career portfolios. Prerequisite: REC 495. Offered spring. Cr 3.   

RHF 106 Ballroom Dance
This class is designed to teach the basic steps in many popular ballroom dances. Students will begin with slow, smooth dances and progress into Rhythm dances. In addition to dance steps, students will cover a variety of dance related topics, including dance floor etiquette, lead and follow technique, and exercises designed to help students dance in a partnership. Because skill or fitness development are objectives in all RHF courses, students must attend and participate in class activities to pass the course. The program reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation in courses that require high intensity exercise. Offered spring. Cr 1.5. 

RHF 109 Beginning Weight Training
The course is a study of the basic principles of weight training and the physiological responses and adaptations to weight training exercises. Specifically, the subject matter will focus on the safe and proper execution of different weight training exercises. In addition, students will study basic aspects of weight training programs, i.e., sets, repetitions, intensity, frequency, duration, progression, specificity, and overload. This course will assist students in developing awareness and appreciation of the role of exercise for a healthy lifestyle and injury prevention. Because skill or fitness development are objectives in all RHF courses, students must attend and participate in class activities to pass the course. The program reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation in courses that require high intensity exercise. Offered fall. Cr 1.5. 

RHF 118 Yoga
In this course, students will explore various postures and styles of yoga, breathing techniques, and meditation. Students also will discuss ancient yogic philosophy and examine how it applies to their individual lives and yoga practice. Because skill or fitness development are objectives in all RHF courses, students must attend and participate in class activities to pass the course. The program reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation in courses that require high intensity exercise. Offered fall and spring. Cr 1.5. 

RHF 121 Self Defense
Emphasizing the importance of personal mastery and good decision making over technique, this course focuses on risk scenarios and developing strategies for those scenarios through discussion and analysis, emphasizing the importance of customizing strategies to the individual. The course examines shortcomings of traditional “techniques based” approaches and instead focuses on specific risks we face such as road rage, the role of alcohol and drugs in social settings and society, as well as simple high impact techniques easily adaptable by most students for those rare instances when they must take a physical stand. Each class incorporates a “Self Defense Current Events” review to look at real life events in Portland, Maine and around the country to serve as examples to discuss and analyze. Because skill or fitness development are objectives in all RHF courses, students must attend and participate in class activities to pass the course. The program reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation in courses that require high intensity exercise. Offered fall and spring. Cr 1.5. 

RHF 122 Aerobic Kickboxing
Blending boxing, kicking techniques, aerobics, pilates, yoga, and a dash of middle school gym class, this course integrates these elements into a fast paced cross training program. Fundamentals are first introduced via a “techniques” format set to music. Later in the semester, students transition to impact striking, using target pads to develop power, speed, and accuracy. The course embraces several mantras, including “know the thing, do the thing” and importance of focusing on each activity and technique to maximize the benefit of the work out. Proper warm up, stretching and cooling down techniques are also incorporated. Because skill and fitness development is an objective of the course, students must attend and participate in class activities in order to pass. The Department reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation. Offered fall and spring. Cr 1.5. 

RHF 123 Introduction to Sea Kayaking
This course is designed to provide education and skill development in sea kayaking. Because skill and fitness development is an objective of the course, students must attend and participate in class activities in order to pass. The Department reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation. Students are required to pay vendor charges for equipment and parking. Offered fall. Cr 1.5.

RHF 124 T'ai Chi Qigong
In this course, students will become acquainted with essential biomechanics, applied mental intention, and internal energy development methods required to build gong and establish foundations for Taiji forms; learn basic history of Taijiquan and about yin/yang theory; learn efficient and integrated use of body and the roles of breath, heart/mind, and intentionality on physicality and personal harmony; explore relationships among mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual experiences; explore differences among physical, mental, and mind/body learning; and learn to appreciate relationships between healing arts and martial arts aspects of Taiji. Because skill or fitness development are objectives in all RHF courses, students must attend and participate in class activities to pass the course. The program reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation in courses that require high intensity exercise. Offered fall and spring. Cr 1.5. 

RHF 126 Stability and Physio-Ball Exercise
This class will use the physio ball to design a total fitness program to build a long, lean, and agile body. Students will concentrate on strengthening and lengthening muscles of the torso. The program will include elements of core strength, balance, flexibility, endurance, and cardiovascular fitness. Because skill or fitness development are objectives in all RHF courses, students must attend and participate in class activities to pass the course. The program reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation in courses that require high intensity exercise. Offered fall. Cr 1.5.

RHF 131 – Indoor Cycling Instructor Preparation
This interactive course prepares students for an entry-level instructor position for indoor cycling. Students will receive detailed instruction on all aspects of teaching a group indoor cycling class emphasizing biking fundamentals, terminology, ride design, the role of music, and the long lasting impact of indoor cycling on your health. Relevance will be made to teaching all types of group fitness instruction. Each class is held on the Portland Campus, Sullivan Gym in the indoor cycling studio. Students will be graded on their ability to apply cycling skills and knowledge by demonstrating competency in teaching techniques as they gain experience while leading the class, with a focus on collaboration. Students will create a portfolio of indoor cycling programs and other materials. Attendance is required. This course is set to meet once a week for a 2 hour block. Offered fall and spring. Cr 1.5.

RHF 218 Yoga Fusion
Through the unique Yoga Fusion style, students will advance and deepen their understanding of the practice of yoga. Students will learn to guide the body-mind-spirit from an introduction of yoga to an intermediate practice. The relationship to health will be analyzed through various systems of the body. Prerequisite: RHF 118. Offered spring and summer. Cr 1.5.

SPM 100 Introduction to Exercise, Health, and Sport Sciences
This course orients the student to the expectations of a baccalaureate education in athletic training, exercise science, or health sciences. Allied health historical perspectives, education, careers, certification, and professional associations are explored. Educating the students about the structure and progression of the three degrees will be discussed. Cr 3.

SPM 210 Clinical Athletic Training Principles I
An introduction to the principles of prevention, examination, treatment, and reconditioning of physical activity injuries. Lecture information prepares students for supervised clinical experiences. Completion of a minimum of 30 and a maximum of 50 clinical observation hours required. Prerequisites: ALT major; 24 University credit hours completed; minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50; SPM 100 or concurrent; SPM 216 or concurrent; BIO 111, 112 or SCI 170, 171 or concurrent; Corequisite: SPM 211. Cr 3.

SPM 211 Protective Taping and Wrapping
An introduction to the principles of taping and wrapping as they pertain to preventative, protective, and post injury situations. In addition, basic skills in stretching will be taught. Laboratory course in which the completion of competencies prepares students for supervised clinical experience. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 100 or concurrent; SPM 216 or concurrent; Corequisite: SPM 210. Cr 1.

SPM 216 Emergency Medical Response
This course covers the topics prescribed by the American Red Cross in their emergency medical response course, including respiratory and cardiac emergencies, wounds, poisoning, sudden illness, burns and other topics. Successful completion of the certification requirements will lead to Emergency Medical Response and CPR for the Professional Rescuer certifications from the American Red Cross. Prerequisite: ALT, EXS, or HLS major. Cr 3.

SPM 219 Lifetime Physical Fitness and Wellness
The primary emphasis of this course is to teach students how to take control of their personal health and lifestyle habits. Major areas will include nutrition/weight management, fitness training techniques, flexibility, coronary risk factor management, muscular strength/endurance, stress management, and other wellness-related topics. Class content will include readings, discussions, self-assessment activities and labs, and development of personalized nutrition and physical activity plans. Cr 3.

SPM 230 Psychology of Physical Activity and Sport
This course presents an overview of concepts, theories, principles, and research related to exercise and sport behaviors. Practical application of psychological principles and techniques that help facilitate behavior change during exercise and sport activities will be covered. Prerequisites: ALT, EXS, or HLS major; sophomore level standing. Cr 3.

SPM 260 Introduction to Personal Training
An overview of the knowledge, skills, and abilities needed by fitness instructors to plan, implement, and evaluate safe and effective exercise programs. Emphasis is on exercise programs for individuals and groups. A 45-hour field experience is incorporated into the course to provide students with practical application related to course work. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; SPM 216, SPM 219 or concurrent, junior level standing. Cr 3.

SPM 265 Therapeutic Modalities
An exploration of the physical principles, physiological effects, indications, contraindications, safety precautions, and operating procedures of therapeutic modalities. Includes application of modalities in the laboratory setting. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 100, SPM 210, SPM 211, and SPM 216. Lecture 2 credits, Lab 1 credit. Cr 3.

SPM 270 Athletic Training Clinic I
Completion of a minimum of 150 and a maximum of 175 clinical hours applying proficiency knowledge and skills in an athletic training clinical setting. The first clinical course for students enrolled in the athletic training major. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 100, SPM 210, SPM 211, and SPM 216. Cr 2.

SPM 302 Pharmacology for Athletic Training and Exercise Science
This course covers the general concepts and principles of pharmacology as it relates to the profession of athletic training and disciplines within the exercise sciences. An explanation of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles are covered as are the indications, contraindications, precautions, dose information, allergies, and adverse side effects of prescription and nonprescription drugs commonly used by the physically active person. Governing regulations including storing, transporting, dispensing, and recording of medication will be discussed. Performance-enhancing substances and drug testing in sports will also be covered. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; BIO 113 or SCI 172; CHY 107 or CHY 113; junior level standing. Cr 3.

SPM 310 Athletic Training Principles II
This is an intermediate study of principles for the prevention, examination, treatment, and reconditioning of physical activity injuries. Lecture and laboratory competencies prepare students for supervised clinical experiences. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 100, SPM 210, SPM 211, and SPM 216. Lecture 2 credits, Lab 1 credit. Cr 3.

SPM 325 Methods of Resistance Training and Conditioning
Theoretical and practical study of practices and methods involved in developing and implementing resistance training and conditioning programs for physically active populations. A 45-hour field experience is incorporated into the course to provide students with practical application related to course work. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; BIO 113, 114 or SCI 172, 173; SPM 216, SPM 260, SPM 330, SPM 381 or concurrent; junior level standing. Cr 3.

SPM 330 Physiology of Exercise
An investigation of the acute and chronic effects exercise incurs on the body. Muscle physiology, respiration, cardiac function, circulation, energy metabolism and application to training will be emphasized and applied in laboratory activities. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; CHY 107 or CHY 113; BIO 113, 114 or SCI 172, 173. Lecture 2 credits, Lab 1 credit. Cr 3.

SPM 340 Therapeutic Exercise
A study of the basic components of a comprehensive therapeutic exercise program including functional anatomy, joint mobilizations, and rehabilitation programs will be discussed for the appendicular and axial skeletons. In addition, the physiological effects, safety precautions, indications, contraindications, modes of resistance, and specific rehabilitation protocols will be covered. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 370, SPM 410; SPM 325, SPM 330, SPM 381 or concurrent. Lecture 2 credits, Lab 1 credit. Cr 3.

SPM 350 Health Promotion Programs
This course examines the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion programs in a variety of settings. Theoretical and practical concepts are discussed. Specific health promotion programs to be addressed include cardiovascular disease prevention (blood pressure and cholesterol control), physical fitness, nutrition and weight control, stress management and relaxation, substance abuse prevention, financial fitness, and occupational safety and health. Prerequisites: EXS or HLS major; junior level standing. Cr 3.

SPM 352 Nutrition for Physical Performance
The in-depth study of general nutritional practices applied to athletes and other individuals who are physically active. The course will emphasize basic cellular metabolism as it relates to energy production and expenditure during the course of preparation and training for athletics and physical activity. Weight control, use of ergogenic aids, and nutritional supplements will also be discussed. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; CON 252, SPM 330. Cr 3.

SPM 370 Athletic Training Clinic II
Completion of a minimum of 150 and a maximum of 175 clinical hours applying proficiency knowledge and skills in an athletic training clinical setting. The second clinical course for students enrolled in the athletic training major. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 265, SPM 270, SPM 310; BIO 113, 114 or SCI 172,173. Cr 2.

SPM 371 Athletic Training Clinic III
Completion of a minimum of 150 and a maximum of 175 clinical hours applying proficiency knowledge and skills in an athletic training clinical setting. The third clinical course for students enrolled in the athletic training major. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 370, SPM 410; SPM 325, SPM 330, SPM 381 or concurrent. Cr 2.

SPM 381 Kinesiology
Structural and functional anatomical analysis of human movement. Course will also incorporate principles of mechanics as they apply to the analysis of human movement. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; BIO 113, 114 or SCI 172, 173; PHY 101, 102 or PHY 111, 114 or concurrent. Lecture 2 credits, Lab 1 credit. Cr 3.

SPM 385 Practicum I
This introductory field experience provides opportunity for practical application of knowledge gained through prior coursework in exercise science. The student will assist in the leadership of a wide variety of university-based and off-campus programs, with special emphasis on either personal training experiences or group exercise instruction. Prerequisites: EXS major; SPM 216, SPM 260; junior level standing; permission of instructor. Cr 3.

SPM 390 Biomechanics
Evaluation, analysis, and application of anatomical and mechanical factors that influence human movement. Prerequisites: SPM 381, junior level standing. Cr 3.

SPM 395 Practicum II
Building upon experiences gained from Practicum I, the student continues assisting in the leadership of university-based and off-campus programs, with additional experience in best business practices. Prerequisites: EXS major; SPM 385; junior level standing, permission of instructor. Cr 3.

SPM 398 Independent Study
This course is intended to provide majors in the Department of Exercise, Health, and Sport Sciences with an opportunity to pursue a project independently. Students should select a faculty advisor and develop a course proposal with their advisor. A final written paper is required. Prerequisites: ALT, EXS, or HLS major; junior level standing; permission of instructor. Cr 1-3.

SPM 410 Athletic Training Principles III
This is an advanced study of principles for the prevention, examination, treatment and reconditioning of physical activity injuries. General medical concepts are also discussed. Lecture and laboratory competencies prepare students for supervised clinical experiences. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 265, SPM 270, SPM 310; BIO 113, 114 or SCI 172, 173. Lecture 2 credits, Lab 1 credit. Cr 3.

SPM 430 Exercise Testing, Assessment, and Prescription
This course focuses on knowledge and skills necessary for assessing health-related components of physical fitness. The course will also focus on prescription and design of programs to develop health-related fitness that will be applied in the laboratory setting. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; SPM 330; SPM 325, 381 or concurrent. Lecture 2 credits, Lab 1 credit. Cr 3.

SPM 431 Advanced Exercise Physiology
An advanced study of the whole-body and cellular responses and adaptations to exercise related to human performance limitations, training effects, and health related benefits. Emphasis is on human bioenergetics, metabolism, cardiovascular structure and function, and cardiopulmonary responses to exercise. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; SPM 330. Cr 3.

SPM 440 Manual Therapy
This course will take a detailed approach into the principles, theories, and evidence concerning the use of manual therapy for the treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Students will be taught and asked to demonstrate specific skills and techniques that enhance efficient and effective treatment of a wide range of clinical presentations pertaining to the spine and extremities using multiple manual therapy strategies. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 230, SPM 302, SPM 325, SPM 330, SPM 340, SPM 371, SPM 381; SPM 352, SPM 430 or concurrent. Cr 3.

SPM 450 Exercise for Special Populations
The focus of this course is on exercise programming guidelines and recommendations for a variety of special populations that includes but is not limited to heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, the elderly and pediatric conditions. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; SPM 430 or concurrent. Cr 3.

SPM 470 Athletic Training Clinic IV
Completion of a minimum of 225 and a maximum of 275 clinical hours applying proficiency, knowledge, and skills in traditional athletic training and general medical (up to 15 clinical hours) settings. A minimum of 50 and a maximum of 75 traditional setting hours will be completed during the month of August within an athletic pre-season venue. The fourth clinical course for students enrolled in the athletic training major. Prerequisites: ALT major; SPM 230, SPM 302, SPM 325, SPM 330, SPM 340, SPM 371, SPM 381; SPM 352, 430 or concurrent. Cr 3.

SPM 477 Health Research Methods
Introduction to health research methods with a focus on understanding the basic application of the qualitative and quantitative research process. Review and evaluation of health-based studies with an emphasis to translate and communicate research to improve professional practice. Prerequisites: ALT or HLS major; LAC 120 or MAT 120 or PSY 201. Cr 3.

SPM 480 Organization and Administration of Athletic Training
Administrative components of an athletic training program. Facility design; supply ordering, budget, and inventory; insurance, personnel, and athletic training educational considerations. Prerequisites: ALT major, SPM 230, SPM 302, SPM 325, SPM 330, SPM 340, SPM 371, SPM 381; SPM 352, SPM 430 or concurrent. Cr 3.

SPM 485 Senior Thesis I
Introduction to health-related research with an emphasis on understanding the research process and becoming a consumer of research. Critique of health-related research findings to exercise and health professions and their application to professional practice is a major component of this course. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; MAT 120 or PSY 201; SPM 330, SPM 385, SPM 395, SPM 430; senior level standing. Cr 3.

SPM 486 Senior Thesis II
A continuation of SPM 485. Students will be introduced to various research-related issues such as design, methodology, statistics, and writing scientific manuscripts involved in conducting research in exercise science. Students will be required to conduct a research experiment using learned techniques. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; SPM 485; senior level standing. Cr 3.

SPM 495 Clinical Internship
This culminating experience for athletic training and exercise science majors provides the opportunity for students to apply knowledge and skills gained through didactic, practicum, clinical, and laboratory experiences in a work setting. Prerequisites: ALT or EXS major; completion of all major requirements, or concurrent; permission of instructor. Cr 3-12.

Graduate (Back to top)

ATH 500 Athletic Training Professional Practice I
This course will provide an orientation to athletic training education and the profession. Program and clinical requirements will be reviewed and completed within the course. Students will be introduced to core competencies concepts and definitions in athletic training that will serve as a foundation for future content. Cr 1.

ATH 501 Foundations of Patient Safety
This course will focus on patient safety in athletic training. Topics will include: taping, bracing, wrapping, concepts of patient safety, facility maintenance, handwashing, patient consent, assessment of environmental conditions, indications and contraindications of basic preventative interventions. In addition, students will select and fit sports equipment. Cr 1.

ATH 502 Acute Care of Injury and Illness
Introduction to presentation and management of acute and catastrophic conditions. Prevention strategies will be discussed for sudden death conditions, including emergency action plans. Certifications in emergency cardiac care and first aid will be obtained. Cr 3.

ATH 503 Acute Care of Injury and Illness Lab 
Simulation and standardized patient experiences will be utilized to apply and synthesize acute care knowledge, skills, and athletic training core competencies into patient cases. Prerequisites: Prior or current enrollment in ATH 502. Cr 1.

ATH 504 Human Anatomy
This course will examine functional human anatomy. Topics will include origins, insertions, actions and nerve innervations of muscles, arthrokinematics, boney landmark identification, and basic principles of human movement. Cr 2.

ATH 510 Examination, Diagnosis and Care I 
This course will teach students to examine, diagnose and treat orthopedic injuries of the lower extremity and lumbar spine. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 501, ATH 502, and ATH 503. Cr 3.

ATH 511 Examination, Diagnosis and Care I Lab
This course will teach students to examine, diagnose, and treat orthopedic injuries of the lower extremity and lumbar spine. Prerequisites: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ATH 510. Cr 1.

ATH 512 Examination, Diagnosis and Care II 
This course will teach students to examine, diagnose and treat orthopedic injuries of the upper extremity and thoracic and cervical spine. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B- or higher in ATH 510. Cr 3.

ATH 513 Examination, Diagnosis and Care II Lab
This course will teach students to examine, diagnose and treat orthopedic injuries of the upper extremity and thoracic and cervical spine. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ATH 512. Cr 1.

ATH 514 Examination and Management of Non-orthopedic Conditions
This course presents knowledge and evaluation skills for non-orthopedic illnesses and injuries. Evaluations will be approached using a reflective, critical reasoning approach and through the lenses of interprofessional collaboration, cultural competence, health literacy, and patient safety. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 501 and ATH 502. Cr 3.

ATH 515 Examination and Management of Non-orthopedic Conditions Lab 
Students will be introduced to general medical evaluation skills, including auscultation and neurological examination. Simulation and standardized patient experiences will be utilized to apply non-orthopedic knowledge and skills, as well as in interprofessional collaboration. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ATH 514. Cr 1.

ATH 520 Health and Human Performance 
This course examines the advanced methods and techniques associated with the design of strength and conditioning programs to enhance human performance in sport and fitness. The course is designed to prepare students for the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification. Cr 3.

ATH 521 Health and Human Performance Lab 
This course examines the advanced methods and techniques associated with the design of strength and conditioning programs to enhance human performance in sport and fitness. The course is designed to prepare students for the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ATH 520. Cr 1.

ATH 522 Therapeutic Interventions I 
This course will explore foundational theories, principles and clinical application of the therapeutic modalities. Topics for this course will include: cold therapy, hydrotherapy, therapeutic heat, therapeutic ultrasound, electrotherapy, electromagnetic therapy, spinal traction, pharmacological agents and compression. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 501, and ATH 502. Cr 3.

ATH 523 Therapeutic Interventions I Lab 
This course will explore foundational theories, principles and clinical application of the therapeutic modalities. Topics for this course will include: cold therapy, hydrotherapy, therapeutic heat, therapeutic ultrasound, electrotherapy, electromagnetic therapy, spinal traction, pharmacological agents and compression. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ATH 522. Cr 1.

ATH 524 Therapeutic Interventions II
This course will explore contemporary manual therapy techniques and injury prevention strategies. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 520, ATH 521, ATH 522, and ATH 523. Cr 3.

ATH 525 Therapeutic Interventions II Lab
This course will explore contemporary manual therapy techniques and injury prevention strategies. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ATH 524. Cr 1.

ATH 571 Clinical 1 
Clinical field experience and face-to-face in-class meeting. Focused on practicing and applying acute care and prevention skills. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 501, ATH 502, ATH 503, and ATH 506. Cr 1.

ATH 572 Clinical 2 
Immersive clinical field experience and online meeting with a focus on health promotion. Students will complete a patient or community education project. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B- or higher in ATH 571. Cr 1.

ATH 573 Clinical 3 
Clinical field experience and face-to-face meeting with a focus on practicing and applying skills related to assessment, diagnosis, treatment and therapeutic modalities. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 510, ATH 511, ATH 520, ATH 521, and ATH 572. Cr 2. 

ATH 626 Therapeutic Interventions III
This course will teach students to select and incorporate therapeutic exercise techniques into comprehensive patient care plans. Students will also identify, refer and give support to patients with behavioral health conditions. Topics will include: therapeutic and corrective exercise, movement training, proprioceptive activities, home care and behavioral health. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 512, ATH 513, ATH 524, and ATH 525. Cr 3.

ATH 627 Therapeutic Interventions III Lab
Students will select and incorporate therapeutic exercise techniques into comprehensive patient care plans. Students will also identify, refer and give support to patients with behavioral health conditions. Topics will include: therapeutic and corrective exercise, movement training, proprioceptive activities, home care and behavioral health. Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in ATH 626. Cr 1. 

ATH 640 Health Care Administration
Components of developing, implementing, and critiquing policies and procedures related to daily operations and specific conditions, such as mental health and head injuries. Basic business administration practices will be covered, such as budgeting and inventory with an emphasis on concepts on health informatics and quality improvement. Cr 3.

ATH 641 Health Promotion
In this course, students will be introduced to health promotion and wellness strategies for the general population, as well as for patients with or at risk for chronic health conditions. Students will develop and engage in community-based health education projects, emphasizing health literacy concepts. Cr 3.

ATH 642 Athletic Training Professional Practice II 
Students will prepare for transition to clinical practice by understanding human resource and job orientation processes, developing professional materials. Students will be encouraged to participate in professional advocacy and leadership opportunities. Additionally, topics of program evaluation and planning, and ethical and legal practice will be covered. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of B- or higher in all prior athletic training courses and concurrent enrollment in remaining required athletic training courses. Cr 3. 

ATH 643 BOC Preparation 
This course will prepare students to sit for the Board of Certification Exam. Test taking and study strategies, sample exams and previous content will be reviewed. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 640, ATH 641, and ATH 675. Cr 1.

ATH 650 Research Design 
This course will introduce concepts of research design including qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods approaches. Students will develop a research question, conduct a review of literature, create methods, determine the appropriate treatment of data for various research designs and interpret statistical results. Cr 3.

ATH 651 Capstone I 
Students will design and propose a scholarly capstone project with the intent of contributing to the existing athletic training body of knowledge. Students will obtain necessary approvals and begin their capstone project. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B- or higher in ATH 650. Cr 3.

ATH 652 Capstone II 
Students will complete scholarly capstone projects initiated in Capstone I. Students will present their scholarly contributions and submit for publication. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B- or higher in ATH 651. Cr 1.

ATH 673 Clinical Education
Clinical field experiences in settings with non-sports activities and patients of diverse backgrounds. This course will include a face-to-face meeting with a focus on practicing and applying skills related to assessment, diagnosis, treatment of orthopedic injuries and general medical conditions. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B- or higher in ATH 530. Cr 1.

ATH 674 Clinical 4
Immersive clinical field experience with online meeting sessions. This course will focus on pre-participation screenings, assessing environmental factors and treating related illness. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of B- or higher in ATH 573. Cr 2.

ATH 675 Clinical 5 
A continuation of clinical 4 field experience with online meeting sessions. This course will focus on application of therapeutic interventions. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or higher in ATH 626, ATH 627, and ATH 674. Cr 2.

ATH 676 Clinical 6 
Immersive clinical field experience with online meetings sessions. This course will focus on health care administration and transition to practice. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of B- or better in ATH 640, ATH 641, and ATH 675. Cr 3.