Department of English

Lorrayne Carroll

Associate Professor of English
Lorrayne Carroll

Office Location

3B Luther Bonney Hall

Faculty Office Hours Fall 2017

M/W 12:00-1:30 pm (W 12:00-1:00 pm on 9/13, 10/18, 11/15, 12/6) & by appt.

Phone

207-780-4324

Academic Degrees

  • Ph.D., English Literature, The John Hopkins University, 1996
  • M.A., English Literature, The John Hopkins University, 1989
  • B.A., English, University of Southern Maine, 1986

Profile

Lorrayne Carroll is Associate Professor of English and member of the Women and Gender Studies Council. In the Department of English, she teaches courses in Early American Studies and Literacy Studies as well as service courses for the Department, such as College Writing, Fiction the Genre, Topics in Literature, and Introduction to Literary Studies. In WGS, she teaches Introduction to WGS and several cross-listed courses, notably Earlier Women Writers and Witchcraft Studies.

Professor Carroll’s primary areas of research include Early American Studies, particularly Captivity Studies and Witchcraft Studies, and Cultural Studies. Additionally, she writes with Joseph E. Medley (USM-Econ) on topics related to globalization and development. Carroll also conducts research for pedagogical purposes in the fields of Literacy Studies and Civic Engagement.

Carrol’s service includes a broad array of activities in collaboration with regional and national organizations engaged in literacy and humanities projects. A representative sample includes Carroll’s continuing work with the Maine Humanities Council as facilitator for pilot sessions in the New Books/New Readers program (e.g., with migrant workers in the state’s apple orchards and with New Mainers in Portland Adult Education); with the Opportunity Alliance and Learningworks, as partners in service learning courses; and with occasional public service for cultural and economic development agencies (e.g., the Maine Charitable Mechanics Association and the Portland Ballet). Carroll currently serves as a participant in an Oklahoma Humanities Council grant that supports the design and implementation of a community outreach component of the Society of Early Americanists’ Conference, to be held in Tulsa, OK in Spring, 2017.

Research Interests

Early American literature and culture, women and gender studies, literacy, and cultural studies