Lewiston-Auburn College

Course Descriptions

Use the links below to see courses offered by individual programs or by the college. Schedule and registration information can be found here.


 

The following courses are offered by Lewiston-Auburn College in addition to those within specific programs linked above.

Lewiston-Auburn College: Learning Assistance and Tutoring (back to top)

The University's learning assistance program includes developmental coursework in mathematics, learning strategy courses, and the Learning (tutoring) Centers. The developmental course (MAT 9) provides students with instruction to help them achieve college level readiness in mathematics. The Learning Center and the Writing Center at Lewiston Auburn College offers tutoring in writing, science, and mathematics. Programs for English for Speakers of Other Languages are offered on USM's Portland campus. The Academic Self-Management course (LAC 188 - College and Career Success) offers learning strategies to assist students with study skills and the transition into higher education.

LAC 188 College & Career Success

The focus of the course is on self, learning and career exploration and the critical role of personal decision making in identifying and pursuing strengths, interests, and areas for growth. Students will learn to understand their own decision making process and the factors that influence that process. Course activities will include assessments of self, assessments of interest, and explorations of academic life and career. This course provides students with the opportunity and tools for taking enhanced control of their academic learning process. Throughout the course, students will be introduced to resources and support systems to help maximize the University experience and create an intentional career path. This is a 3-credit course used as elective credit toward graduation.  Cr 3.

LAC 200 Community Learning Groups: Planning for Academic Success
This specially designed course for TRiO Student Support Services participants serves as the first module in a series which will enhance the learning experience at USM and prepare the student to focus on personal and academic goals. Topics will vary, but will include self-assessments for career and learning, study strategies, making the most of academic advising, taking full advantage of university offerings, financial literacy, leadership and diversity development, and planning for careers or graduate school. The instructor’s role will be to serve as advisor and guide, and in addition, there will be guest speaker experts in some classes. Students will normally take this course in their first semester of SSS participation as it is an important anchor to the program. Cr. 1.

MAT 9 Developmental Mathematics
A review of fundamental topics of arithmetic needed for a study of algebra. This course will cover the following topics: addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of fractions; use of decimals and percent; estimation; addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of real numbers; exponents; order of arithmetic operations; distributive property; combining like terms; substitution to evaluate expressions and formulas; grouping symbols; addition and multiplication principle; formulas; sets; solving equations with fractions; translating English phrases into algebraic expressions; and solving word problems using geometric formulas. Successful completion of the course and the course exit exam at a C level (75%) or higher is required. Credit earned in MAT 009 does not apply or accumulate toward any degree program nor contribute to the GPA at the University of Southern Maine. After successful completion of MAT 9, students must then complete MAT 101B (College Readiness Mathematics) to fully meet college readiness in mathematics or place out of the math college readiness courses via a retake of the math placement exam. Cr 3.

Lewiston Auburn College: Career Development Courses (back to top)

LAC 269 Exploring Careers, Choosing Life Roles
In this mid-level course in the career development series, students relate self-knowledge to career and life roles, with an emphasis on gaining and managing career information; learning various career and life decision-making strategies; and communicating formative academic, co-curricular, and professional experiences in such formats as accomplishment statements and informal interviews. Prerequisite: None. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5.

LAC 413 Job Search Skills for the 21st Century
In this final course in the career development series, students assume active agency in career planning through learning how to market themselves to prospective employers. They learn to create and use the tools needed for career placement, such as cover letters, resumes, and interviews. Prerequisite: LAC 269. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 1.5.

LAC 447 Internship
This online course provides students the opportunity to work in their chosen field to evaluate their interest and acquire basic skills needed to market themselves effectively. Students participate in an online seminar in which they learn about and reflect on workplace issues. Students wishing to take more than 3 credit hours must have permission from their faculty advisors. Prerequisite: LAC 413. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3-6.

Lewiston-Auburn College: General Courses (back to top)

HUM 105 Basic Photography (CE)
This course is an introduction to black and white photography, designed to help students gain understanding through "hands-on" photographic work. Lectures include classroom discussions concerning the history and aesthetics of photography, and techniques include camera and lens functions, exposure methods, basic black and white film processing, printmaking, print finishing, and presentation techniques. Cr. 3

HUM 201 Creative Writing: Cultivating Your Inner Muse
This course is designed to help students hone their creative strategies and inspire them to commit to the practice of writing. We will explore the practical implications of creative expression. In addition to investigating the genres of fiction, creative non-fiction, and poetry, students will identify and devise an approach to writing that works for them. This course is appropriate for novices and experienced writers alike and will include discussions of readings and traditional workshop response to students' writing. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 213 Metaphor in Literature, Science, and Religion
This course is a comparative study of literature, science, and religion, focusing on aims, methods, and values, and on the nature of truth and creativity in each discipline. Readings in fiction, poetry, religion, and modern physical and biological science provide a basis for discussion of the metaphoric nature of literary, religious, and scientific discourse. Our goal is to demonstrate that all three areas of human endeavor rely heavily on the metaphoric nature of language in their search for meaning and truth. This course consists of careful reading of texts, active class discussion, and out of class essays. No college science background required. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

HUM 230 Digital Photography
Working with digital cameras, students will learn to see photographically in color. They will gain a better understanding of color relationships using color as design elements and the overall artistic and aesthetic uses of color photography. Students will learn controls of their camera's software. Adobe Photoshop software will be the primary tool used for image control and manipulation. Cr. 3

HUM 260 Media Literacy and Theories of Popular Culture
In order to foster a critical approach to modern media, this course applies theory and analysis to popular culture texts. What do we learn about our modern industrial consumerist society from the texts it produces? What makes something popular, and how do we detect a text's projected world view? We will study TV, film, photography, graphic novels, the Internet, and music. Framing popular culture as a mass-media driven phenomenon, we will explain the deeper significance of our society using a selection of critical and theoretical commentary. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3

HUM 290 Thinking and Writing/Writing and Healing
Writing can be an experiential and subjective process that influences identity, births thought, and facilitates healing. Students will learn and practice exploratory writing in class as a form of self-analysis as well as investigate the research on how writing about chronic illnesses or traumatic events can reduce symptoms. Cr. 3
HUM 290 to be offered as a seminar every third semester, alternating Fall and Spring.

HUM 295 Creative Expression in Drawing
In this course, students will study drawing as a means to enhance powers of observation, imagination and expression.  The elements of line, shape, composition, value and texture will be explored in classroom drawing exercises and assignments and out of class drawing experiences.  Basic drawing techniques will be introduced in a variety of media.  Assignments will be geared to develop each individual's ability to make drawings of objects from the natural world and drawings based on the expression of ideas.  Cr. 3

HUM 298 Applied Arts & Humanities: Focus on Lewiston-Auburn and the Androscoggin River Valley Communities Intersecting art, literature, history, and philosophy and using a project-based, community-centered approach, this foundational course in the major addresses the field itself. Emphasis is placed on the significant contribution of Arts & Humanities study to life-long learning as well as to expanded, digitally informed, mastery of reading and writing, critical thinking and analysis, and the principles of design—all desired by a broad range of employers. Cr. 3

HUM 304 Writing Children's Literature: How to Craft Compelling Stories
An exploration of how real life stories, details, characters, and voices combine with images to create compelling children's stories. This course includes lecture, class discussion and writing workshops. Cr 3

HUM 316 New Digital Media Literacies: Self-Fashioning and Critiquing Information
Students investigate, critique, and engage in a range of experiments to discover how new media radically change both thinking and language, as visual material, writing, and technology interplay online to form new, hybridic modes of reading and writing, teaching and learning. Drawing from such diverse fields as literature, geography, and education, areas covered include digital Shakespeare, the internet as a utopia, and a video game field study to explore multi-modal thinking. Prerequisites:  College Writing (LCC 110/111) and Critical Thinking (LCC 200) with a C or better. Cr. 3
HUM 316 to be offered as a seminar every third semester, Fall and Spring.

HUM/LOS 317 New Media and Social Networking: Identity and Expression Online
How are private and public identities established online? Are political and social movements built, organized, even undermined by social networking and online culture? Do online communities impact real world communication, language, and thought? Read critical theory on new media and explore technological and cultural associations with this nascent but pervasive phenomenon. Cr 3.

HUM 322 Professional Communications
This hands-on course will explore the types of writing and other forms of communication we use in a professional setting. By studying examples of writing in context and by creating original work, we will examine how get the point across in clear, concise and compelling language. We will also address creating strong and effective visual and verbal communication.  Cr. 3

HUM 325 World History and Geography I
This is the first in a series of two courses that are designed to help students develop an understanding of and an appreciation for world history and geography. The course's goal is to provide students with a humanistic background from which to better comprehend global complexities. This course will cover the period from prehistory to the age of modern expansion, from about 50,000 to 500 years ago. Prerequisite: Only students with more than 45 credits are permitted to take this course. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr.3

HUM 326 World History and Geography II
This is the second in a series of two courses that are designed to help students become more knowledgeable participants in today's rapidly changing world. Its goal is to make links between global history and modern world situations, as well as find the locations on a map. In other words, it is a primer in "global citizenship." This course covers the period from the Age of Modern Exploration (ca. 1500) to the present. Prerequisite: Only students with more than 45 credits are permitted to take this course. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies Cr. 3

HUM 335 Working with Writers
This one-credit course provides training for Writing Assistants who work at the LAC Writing Center. Topics covered include basic composition theory, the Writing Center as a workplace, tutoring in digital formats, helping writers across the curriculum, and communication skills. The course prepares Writing Assistants for CRLA (College Reading and Learning Association) certification. The course may be taken three times (to align with the three levels of CRLA certification). Permission of instructor required. Cr. 1
HUM 335 to be offered as a seminar every Fall and Spring semester.

HUM/SBS 339 Ethnicity, Immigration and Identity: A focus on Lewiston, Maine
This course will focus on concepts of ethnicity, immigration, and identity through an investigation of the history of immigration in the city of Lewiston, Maine. We will explore how ethnic identity is defined, and why people emigrate.  Through historical and contemporary readings and films, oral histories and personal interviews, the course examines the challenges immigrants face as they attempt to assimilate within the U.S. while trying to maintain their native languages, traditions, cultures and communities.  This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3

HUM/SBS 349:  Trauma and Narrative
This course examines the medical, political, and cultural history of the concept of trauma, focusing on how trauma has become a core concern in both contemporary clinical psychology and literary criticism. We consider models for conceptualizing responses to traumatic experiences. Topics include the diagnostic criteria of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, recommended treatment approaches, risk and protective factors.  Students explore “narrative” vs. “traumatic” memories and carefully examine a number of literary texts and films to analyze the characteristics of representations of traumatic memory.  The idea, that fashioning a narrative of traumatic experience is essential to trauma therapy and to the healing effects of trauma literature, will also be explored. Cr. 3

HUM 355 Introduction to Journalism
This course focuses on the principles of journalistic practice and the important role journalism plays in democratic societies.  We consider the historical changes in the field, including the use of new technologies, techniques and methods in contemporary journalism.  Students will develop competencies in the skills of journalism, including research and interviewing, fact-checking and attribution, and journalistic styles. Prerequisites:  College Writing (LCC 110/111) and Critical Thinking (LCC 200) with a C or better. Cr. 3.
HUM 355 to be offered as a seminar every third semester, Fall and Spring

HUM/SBS 358 Representations of Motherhood
This course examines the ways in which motherhood is represented in various cultural forms (including film, literature and political rhetoric) and from within different historical and cultural contexts. Contemporary psychological theories will be considered in terms of how they are used to prescribe normative demands on women and mothers and also how they attribute various powers to mothers that then contribute to the construction of particular social policies and practices. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Cr. 3

HUM/SBS 365: Psychological Language of Dreams and Fairytales
This course explores psychological approaches to understanding the language of dreams and fairytales.  Students consider how works of imaginative literature and dreams inform the theories of Freud and Jung and also how their theories, in turn, have shaped contemporary approaches to understanding images and metaphors.  We, then, culturally situate this psychological approach by comparing it with cross-cultural and literary approaches. Cr. 3

HUM/SBS 366 Transforming Words: Poetry and Psychologies of Change
This course examines the interrelationships between poetry and psychology, with a focus on transformations of meaning in words and lives. Topics will include the varying functions of poetry over the life span, poets' reflections on how and why they write, poetry as political witness and community catalyst, therapeutic uses of poetry, and the distinctive qualities of "poetic" language. Students have the option of pursuing community-based projects involving poetry. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Cr. 3

LAC 112 Microsoft Excel
This course uses a problem-solving approach to electronic spreadsheets. It satisfies the LOS major's requirement and should follow the LAC 150 introductory course. Students will learn advanced data analysis, formulas, and create graphs to interpret the data. This course should be completed prior to taking a financial management, economics, or budgeting course. Prerequisite: LAC 150 or equivalent. Cr 1.

LAC 114 PowerPoint
This computer program allows users an electronic means of giving presentations to groups of people. Students will learn how to create electronic slides using written, graphic, and sound materials. The slides can then be formatted in several different ways: 35 mm slides, overhead transparencies, and handouts. Students who have to give presentations to classes or who are considering careers in teaching, marketing, or public relations fields should consider this course. Cr 1.

LAC 150 Microcomputers and Applications
An introductory lecture and laboratory course designed to introduce students to basic microcomputer concepts and their application to education, business, and home management. This course will cover: Windows, e-mail, Internet, and Microsoft Office: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access. Cr 3.

LAC/LOS 318 Database Management
This course introduces skills and builds proficiency in database management. It is taught on PC computers using the latest version of Microsoft Access and is designed to help students develop competencies in a variety of database processing functions. Students become proficient in setting up databases, managing data, creating reports, using report enhancements, and manipulating data. Prerequisite: LAC 150 or equivalent. Cr 3.

LAC/LOS 334 Integrated Software Packages
This is a course in the use of integrated software packages for report, document, presentation, and information development activities. A variety of instructional activities stress file and data integration and explore intra- and inter-package communications. Integration of word processing, spreadsheet, database, and graphics software is featured using linking and other tools. Students are expected to produce documents, spreadsheets, database reports, and presentations which take full advantage of inter-operability, communication, translating, linking, and sharing functions. Prerequisite: LAC 150 or equivalent. Cr 3.

LAC/SBS 340 Language Acquisition and Literacy Development
This course provides students with opportunities to apply knowledge of fundamental principles and means of investigation used in the study and explanation of language acquisition and literacy development. It plays a foundational role in fostering students' understanding of literacy, which is key to their development as professionals charged with fostering children's literacy development. Cr 3.

Lewiston Auburn College: Professional Education Courses (back to top)

LAE 200 Education in the U.S. with Field Experience
This introductory course combines the study of education in the United States with an examination of its historical perspectives. The course introduces the student to the relationship between schools and society while developing the student’s personal philosophy of education. A two-and-a-half hour per week field experience component allows the student to acquire a better understanding of the teaching profession in a school setting. This is an excellent course for those who wish to explore an interest in teaching. Cr. 4.

LAE 320 Applied Skills of Teaching & Learning
This course introduces students to current research in the field of learning theory and practice and presents various ways of knowing and teaching including neurological brain based learning theories, multiple intelligence theory, perceptual perspectives, emotional and social intelligence theories, and differentiated instruction.  Students will learn how to motivate students and structure learning experiences with best practices.  A major focus is how students develop concepts and build knowledge through exemplary lesson and unit planning and delivery, including the curricular, instructional, and assessment choices educators make.  Other foci will include classroom management and teacher-student interactions. The overall goal of the course is to help create educational leaders with a basic knowledge of educational theory and related best practices, who have the potential to transform educational practice in the field of learning and teaching. Cr. 4.

LAE 401 Teaching Science in Grades 7-12
This course has an interactive laboratory and field-based approach that models the depth, breadth, and sophistication in the teaching and learning of science at the secondary level. The emphasis is on content, process, and methodology needed to become a 7-12 science teacher. The course framework is built on the CCSSO’s Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards, the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T), and the next Generation Science Standards with specific attention to the 7-12 grade level strands. Students will know how to promote diverse learners’ proficiency in state and national standards by implementing multiple strategies to support scientific understanding of patterns, systems and cause and effect events in the natural and designed world.  Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr 3.

LAE 402 Teaching English in Grades 7-12
This course focuses on ways to organize and teach English classes at the middle school and high school levels based upon current research in literacy and national and state standards in English Language Arts. Various strategies involved in designing and managing a student centered literacy program will be presented. Different theories for teaching English will serve as a backdrop for creating classroom activities that connect the literature to the students' lives. The writing process and the reading-writing connection will be emphasized to assess and enhance both literacy and learning. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr 3.

LAE 404 Teaching Social Studies in Grades 7-12
This course is designed to prepare students for best practices in 7-12 social studies instruction. Students will understand the goals of secondary social studies education, as well as the guiding principles and strands of the discipline. The course framework is built on the CCSSO’s Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards and the 7-12 strands of the Maine Learning Results for Social Studies. Students will learn how to promote diverse children’s proficiency in state standards by implementing multiple strategies. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr 3.

LAE 405 Teaching Mathematics in Grades K-8
This course, intended for those preparing to be K-8 teachers, provides experiences to develop, critique, and apply knowledge, skills, and research findings in mathematics, pedagogy, and mathematical learning theory in elementary and middle school classrooms. Major areas of focus include learning and assessment of all children, instruction to support all students’ mathematical understanding, reasoning, communication, and collaboration; standards (national, state, and local); content integration; resources; issues; and the discipline’s philosophical framework. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr 3.

LAE 410 Internship in Science in Grades 7-12
This internship is in conjunction with LAE 401 and allows the student to complete assignments graded in class. These include: videotaped teaching and reflection lessons, professional stance, and final exhibition review: portfolio development.  Cr. 3.

LAE 411 Internship in English in Grades 7-12
This internship is in conjunction with LAE 402 and allows the student to complete assignments graded in class. These include: videotaped teaching and reflection lessons, professional stance, and final exhibition review: portfolio development.  Cr. 3.

LAE 412 Internship in Social Studies in Grades 7-12
This internship is in conjunction with LAE 404 and allows the student to complete assignments graded in class. These include: videotaped teaching and reflection lessons, professional stance, and final exhibition review: portfolio development.  Cr. 3.

LAE 451 Teaching Social Studies in Grades K-8
This course is designed to prepare students for best practices in K-8 social studies instruction. Students will understand the goals of elementary and middle level social studies education, as well as the guiding principles and strands of the discipline. The course framework is built on the CCSSO’s Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards and the K-8 strands of the Maine Learning Results for Social Studies. Students will learn how to promote diverse children’s proficiency in state standards by implementing multiple strategies. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr 3.

LAE 452 Teaching Science in Grades K-8
This course has an interactive laboratory and field-based approach that models the teaching and learning of science at the elementary and middle school levels. The emphasis is on content, process, and methodology. The course framework is built on the CCSSO’s Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (InTASC) Model Core Teaching Standards, the National Educational Technology Standards for Teachers (NETS-T), and the Maine State Standards for Science and Technology with specific attention to the K-8 grade level strands. Students will learn how to promote diverse children’s proficiency in state standards by implementing multiple strategies to support scientific understanding of systems in the natural and designed world. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr 3.

LAE 465 Teaching Reading in Grades K-8
In this course students will learn to use evidence-based instruction to teach reading in grades K-8. Students will examine theories and current research on reading development and process in order to effectively instruct and assess all readers, including students with special needs and from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Students will learn how to implement multiple strategies to support reading development and promote children’s proficiency in state standards. Additionally, digital literacies, reading across the curriculum, and ways to engage and motivate readers will be emphasized.  Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr 3.

LAE 466 Teaching Writing in Grades K-8
In this course students will learn to use evidence-based instruction to teach writing in grades K-8. Students will examine theories and current research on writing development and process in order to effectively instruct and assess all writers, including students with special needs and from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Students will learn how to implement multiple writing strategies across various genres to support writing development and promote children’s proficiency in state standards. Additionally, students will explore the use of technology and participate in writing sessions to develop as writers and teachers of writing. Cr. 3.

LAE 480 Portfolio Seminar
This course is designed to integrate content area study, educational pedagogy, and school field experiences. This course builds upon the principles of learning to teach all subjects and supports students in reflecting upon the related internship, curriculum design and developing appropriate portfolio exhibits. LAE 480 is an intensive supervised internship experience in applying knowledge and skills to the practice of teaching. This course is taught in conjunction with LAE 490, Student Teaching.  Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr 3.

LAE 490 Student Teaching
This internship experience is supported by a 3-credit co-requirement (LAE 480: Portfolio Seminar) and activities completed in the internship placements allow the student to complete assignments graded in seminar. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Praxis I and II and completion of applicable methods courses with at least a B average. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in USM’s teacher education programs. Cr. 3

 

USM/LAC Core Courses (back to top)

LCC 110 College Writing: Language and Literacies (CW)
This first-tier writing instruction course introduces students to one or more themes of the Core curriculum. It emphasizes the connections between reading and writing, and students learn how thinking and the language that conveys it develop and change through the process of drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading. The course introduces students to the conventions of expository academic writing and links to co-curricular activities of the Core. (Note that some students are also required to concurrently take the 1-credit companion course, LCC 111) This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary English. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3.

LCC 123 College and Community I (EYE)
This course is required of all entering students with less than 24 credit hours. The course introduces students to the promise and possibilities of USM LAC's interdisciplinary, writing-intensive, and student-centered culture. Students will consider the relevance the four themes of the Lewiston Common Core (justice, sustainability, democracy and difference) have to their future lives. Students link their own "stories" -- what has brought them to this point in their personal, academic, and professional lives -- with the habits of mind needed for success in college, career, and global citizenship. Cr. 3.

LCC 130 The Biology of Human Health with Lab (SE)
This course introduces basic concepts of biology and explores how these concepts relate to human health. It also explores natural scientific methods of inquiry and applies these methods to complex issues involving the creation and maintenance of human health. Further, the course explores the importance of societal factors in health maintenance. Prerequisite: QR. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4.

LCC 150 Statistics for Informed Decision Making (QR)
This course introduces and applies quantitative analyses to address real world questions. It applies descriptive statistics, sampling and significance testing, correlation, and regression analysis to issues related to the four themes of the Common Core. The course provides the opportunity to interpret and analyze statistical decision making, and identifies data misconceptions and misuses. Prerequisite: math proficiency. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3.

LCC 200 Creative Critical Inquiry into Modern Life (CI)
This writing instruction course introduces students to criteria for identifying and constructing well-reasoned arguments, fosters the discovery and the use of students’ critical/analytical voice in their writing, and develops skills for incorporating, interpreting and integrating the views of others. It provides the opportunity to refine critical thinking abilities by analyzing everyday life experience, including how culture shapes our sense of reality and ourselves. The course highlights the importance of generating good questions and tolerating ambiguity when seeking to understand complex issues. Prerequisite: College Writing. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4.

LCC 220 U.S. Democracy: Origins and Development (SCA)
In this course, students consider the convergence of cultures, events, and ideas that led to the founding of the United States as a republic up to 1877. The course explores the basic structure of the U.S. system of government, the primary political philosophies that undergird it, and past efforts made to remedy injustices that ran counter to the ideals of democracy. This course has been approved by the State Department of Education for content area in secondary Social Studies. Offered fall. Cr 3.

LCC 230 Environmental Science, Policy, and Sustainability with Lab (SE)
This course presents a multidisciplinary survey of the scientific principles underlying energy utilization, nutrient cycles, global warming, population, and natural resource policy and management. The lectures will be comprised of Socratic interactions and group discussions relating regional, national, and global components that encompass ecology, economics, politics, and social endeavors. This course includes a laboratory involving field and lab work and service learning efforts. Prerequisite: QR. Offered spring. Cr 4.

LCC 250 Thinking about the Arts, Thinking through the Arts (CE)
This course explores the tools and strategies important in the interpretation of literature and the arts and encourages an appreciation of the role of literature and the arts in social, political, and cultural life. It promotes an understanding of and an appreciation for the creative expression of shared cultural beliefs in various historical periods of cultures around the world and examines literature and the arts as potential critiques of culture. Co-curricular opportunities are included, especially in connection with the Atrium Gallery. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 3.

 LCC 370 Toward a Global Ethics (EISRC)
This writing instruction course assists students in articulating and assessing their own values. It examines the range of ethical theories and positions and explores the influence of particular cultural ideologies on ethical beliefs. The course considers the ethical principles implied by democracy, sustainability, justice, and difference. It examines ethical issues and dilemmas faced by individuals, organizations, and nations while exploring personal and collective decision-making processes in a global context. Prerequisite: College Writing. Offered fall, spring, summer. Cr 4.

LCC 480 Senior Seminar (Capstone)
This course provides writing instruction experience for students from LAC's four degree programs. Students complete a major research and writing project addressing one of the four themes of the Common Core from an interdisciplinary approach. Prerequisite: CW; CI or EISRC; LOS 300, or SBS 300, or SCI 315. Offered every semester. Cr 3.

Lewiston Common Core Thematic Clusters
Thematic Clusters in the Lewiston Common Core provide students opportunities to explore the concepts and concerns of professions that integrate different disciplinary knowledge and perspectives.   The clusters encourage students to integrate their learning by juxtaposing competing and complementary ways of framing complex issues and problems at an advanced level. Satisfying the thematic cluster requirement involves successfully completing any three courses in the cluster, from at least two different prefixes. Only one of these courses may overlap with your major requirements. 

 In completing their thematic cluster, students will

  • develop a broader and more comprehensive knowledge of the concepts and concerns of a profession; 
  • understand and articulate orally and in writing how subjects are approached and framed from different disciplinary perspectives;
  • gather, interpret and use information at a level appropriate to the courses in the cluster.

 

Public Health Cluster
The Public Health cluster provides students with an introduction to the multitude of public health concerns facing Maine and the world and increases their ability to apply pertinent theoretical and practical knowledge to contribute to a safe and functioning society. Professions that utilize knowledge of public health include medical and allied health and human services, mental health, gerontology, and child and family support. Public health approaches address the full spectrum of services, planning and evaluation. The cluster will also strengthen the pursuit of graduate study in Public Health and Policy.

One course required of all students: 

  • SBS or SCI 336 Introduction to Public Health (offered every Fall)

Choice of two from following list:

  • SBS 304 Food, Culture and Eating
  • SBS 308 Health, Illness, and Culture
  • SBS 335 Legal Issues in Health and Human Services (offered every Fall)
  • SBS or SCI 337 Introduction to Epidemiology  (offered every Spring)
  • LOS or SBS 436 Risk, Public Policy, and Society
  • SCI 315 Environmental Health
  • One or two Public Health-Relevant Nursing course based at LAC – pending 

Expressive Arts/ Healing Arts Cluster
The Expressive Arts/Arts of Healing cluster provides students with an introduction to the arts and how they can be used therapeutically in clinical, educational and community settings. Students learn how use creative writing, the visual arts, music and other forms of art as healing modalities and/or how to incorporate the creative arts into classroom work with children. This cluster can be taken by students interested in pursuing graduate study in counseling, education, expressive therapy, clinical social work, rehabilitation services, and occupational therapy to enhance their skills and understanding of the role of the expressive arts in therapy and healing. 

One course required of all students: 

  • SBS 364 – Exploring Expressive Therapies

Choice of two from following list:

  • HUM 105 – Photography
  • HUM 201 – Creative Writing
  • HUM 230-Digital Photography
  • HUM 290 - Thinking and Writing; Writing and Healing
  • HUM 295 - Creative Expression Is Drawing
  • HUM 307 - Creative Nonfiction
  • HUM/SBS 349 - Trauma and Narrative
  • HUM/SBS 366 - Transforming Words: Poetry and Psychology
  • SBS 367 - Healthy Learners

The Environment: Sustainability and Education
The Environment:  Sustainability and Education Cluster introduces students to the skills and policy development approaches needed by professionals working in the field of environmental education.  Sustainability is an emerging goal for the 21st century that impacts all human activities and is a key tenent of a responsible approach to the environment. This cluster is intended primarily for students interested in assuming educational and leadership roles in society's pursuit of sustainability. SCI 360 Environmental Issues/Sustainability

  • SCI 421 Natural Resource Policy
  • LOS 322 Public Leadership
  • LOS 440 Organizational Change and Development 
  • SCI 240 Applied Botany 
  • SCI 355 Ecology
  • SCI 399 Zoology
  • SCI 450  Methods of Teaching Science
  • LAE 320  Applied Skills

Leadership
The Leadership cluster is an interdisciplinary introduction geared toward anyone interested in developing and expanding their leadership knowledge, skills, and practice, meeting head-on the challenges of our dramatically changing world, and improving the quality and diversity of leadership in organizations and communities -- regionally, nationally and internationally.  Theories, research and techniques of group and organizational leadership are examined with an emphasis in linking theory and practice.  As a socially constructed phenomenon, leadership will be explored as an activity and process, not a position. 

Two courses required of all students:

  1. LOS 300 - Organizational Theory
  2. LOS 350 – Leadership

Choice of one from the following list:

  • SBS 300 - Deviance & Social Control
  • SBS 311 - Theories of Personality
  • SBS 303 – Abnormal Psychology

Leadership and Innovation
In today’s rapidly changing world, leaders must be effective and innovative problems solvers able to strategically negotiate increasingly complex environments.  The Leadership and Innovation cluster provides students with an introduction to important factors influencing organizational innovation and the skills one may hone to optimize creative potential.  The unique interdisciplinary approach in this cluster will guide students through an examination of how knowledge of relevant theory and best practices can help them develop a better grasp on creative thinking, acceptability finding, and innovation implementation.

Two courses required of all students:

  1. LOS 350 - Leadership
  2. LOS 360 Innovation and Organizations

Choice of one from the following list:

  • HUM 316 – New Digital Media Literacies
  • HUM 317 - New media & Social Networking
  • HUM 260 - Media Literacy and Theories of Popular Culture
  • SBS 366 - Transforming Words: Poetry and Psychologies of Change
  • EYE 180 - Exploring Innovation
  • EYE 282 - Communicate: Innovation Engineering II
  • EYE 392 - Commercialize: Innovation Engineering III
  • INV 392 -  Commercialize:  Innovation Engineering III

Early Childhood Education and Studies
The Early Childhood Education and Studies Cluster introduces the skills needed by professionals working with young children and their families in various settings including education and childcare.  These settings include schools and educational institutions such as preschools, as well as in the Birth-Five field of childcare and education. 
One of the following:

  • SBS/HRD 200 Multicultural Human Development
  • SBS 305 Child Development

Two of the following:

  • SBS 309 - Attachment
  • SBS 310 - Childhood and Society
  • SBS 375 - Infant Mental Heath
  • SBS 399 - Resilience in Early Childhood and Across the Lifespan
  • SBS 450 - Assessing Individual Differences in Children
  • EDU 336 - Children's Literature
  • SBS 341 - The Family
  • ECE/SBS 199 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education
  • HUM 304 - Writing Children’s Literature
  • LAC/SBS 340 – Language Acquisition and Literacy development

Resilience and Vulnerability Cluster
The Resilience and Vulnerability cluster provides students with an introduction to the concept of human resilience, i.e., the ability to survive and thrive in adverse circumstances, and its contrasting concept, vulnerability.  This cluster is intended primarily for students outside of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Counseling Concentration, who nevertheless have an interest in understanding the nature of, and contributing factors to, human function and dysfunction.  Students can learn about mental health and illness, and how to build strengths through creative, therapeutic, or community-level interventions.  This cluster has broad relevance to anyone whose career goals involve working with people but especially for human services and policy-oriented fields such as psychology, nursing or medicine, emergency medical response/first responders, public health and policy, and education.

Choose one course from each of the following 3 categories:

Mental health and illness

  • SBS 309 Attachment (can substitute SBS 375 Infant Mental Health)
  • SBS 303 Abnormal Psychology (can substitute PSY 233 Psychopathology)
  • HUM 349 Trauma Narratives
  • SBS 343 Substance Abuse
  • SBS 344 Violence:  Causes and Control

Cultural contributors to resilience and vulnerability

  • SBS 308 Health, Illness, and Culture (can substitute SBS 360 Culture, Behavior, and Personality)
  • HUM 339 Ethnicity, Immigration, and Identity
  • SBS 348 Responding to Mental Health Crisis in the Community

Building resilience

  • HUM 290 Thinking and Writing/Writing and Healing
  • SBS 311 Theories of Personality
  • SBS 367 Healthy Learners
  • SBS 430 Applied Social Policy
  • SBS 364 Introduction to Expressive Arts