Cutler Institute for Health and Social Policy

Population Health and Health Policy

Maine Department of Transportation Region 5 Employee Wellness Program Evaluation Report

Abstract: 

Well-designed wellness programs can keep healthy employees healthy, support employees with health risks to improve their health behaviors, and facilitate organizational efforts to achieve workforce performance goals. Productivity lost through absenteeism, sickness, and injury was a key driver for the development of the Maine Department of Transportation (DOT) Region 5 wellness program, offered since 2004. In 2008, the Maine DOT engages the University of Southern Maine's Muskie School of Public Service to create a more robust and sustainable evaluation process for their employee wellness initiative, as assist in planning to replicate the Region 5 program across the state. The Muskie School evaluation team developed a logic model as the cornerstone for determining the components for program evaluation. The desired outcome of a "safe, injury-free work environment that costs less to maintain and operates at full capacity" provided the direction to develop activities, inputs, outputs, and short-term outcomes.

Publication Type: 
Report
Publish Date: 
October 1, 2008
URL: 
http://muskie.usm.maine.edu/Publications/MDOT-Wellness-Evaluation.pdf

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Dr. Ziller to speak on Rural Implementation and Impact of Medicaid Expansions

The impact of the ACA Medicaid expansion on health care coverage and access in rural areas is largely unknown and will depend on the different state policy contexts in which the expansions are implemented and on existing system capacity. Understanding how many rural residents are likely to become newly eligible for Medicaid under the ACA, as well as their characteristics and health status, will provide important information to aid policymakers in structuring outreach and enrollment strategies and ensuring that the healthcare infrastructure and delivery systems in rural areas can address the needs of these individuals.

On March 18th, Dr. Ziller, Deputy Director of the Maine Rural Health Research Center at the University of Southern Maine, will present via a SHARE webinar, nationally representative information identifying rural-urban differences among low-income non-elderly adults (18 to 65) in the following areas:

  • Medicaid eligibility, pre-ACA
  • Medicaid participation, pre-ACA
  • New Medicaid eligibility in 2014

Dr. Ziller will also analyze the characteristics associated with any rural-urban differences in the above areas. Characteristics to be considered include age, gender, employment, education, income, Census region, health status, current relationship to primary care provider, primary care supply, and FQHC availability.

This webinar is based on Dr. Ziller's research under a State Health Access Reform Evaluation (SHARE) grant to inform federal and state implementation of the ACA Medicaid expansion by estimating the size and characteristics of the rural population likely to be newly eligible.
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