School of Nursing

Doctoral Program Learning Outcomes

The School of Nursing graduate nursing program embraces the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Master’s Education in Nursing (2011), National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculty (NONPF) Core Competencies (2012), NONPF Population–Focused Core Competencies (2013), NONPF Adult-Gerontology NP Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Core Competencies (2010), National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies of Nurse Educators (2005) and AACN Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice (2006).

Based on the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice (2006), five student learning outcomes are expected for the DNP program. These are the ability to:

  1. Evaluate scientific underpinnings that contribute to translation of nursing research to improve practice. 
  2. Evaluate nursing actions that influence health care outcomes for individuals, families, and populations. 
  3. Use knowledge gained through the evaluation of nursing actions that influence health outcomes to improve care delivery, patient outcomes, and systems management. 
  4. Evaluate evidence pertaining to the direct care of patients and management of care for individuals, families, systems, and populations. 
  5. Translate evidence gained through the evaluation of direct care of patients and management of care for individuals, families, systems, and populations to improve and implement health policy.