Philosophy Department

Consider Philosophy Spring 2019

Class: PHI  105 - Philosophy thru History-with Kenneth Knight

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Asynchronous online

*Prerequisite: a college writing course

Description: 
An introduction to philosophy through its history and development, i.e., through an examination of central texts in the history of philosophy, up to and including contemporary works. Specific readings may vary from semester to semester, but will always include some canonical works by classic Western philosophers (e.g., Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, and Kant).  Prerequisite: a college writing course. Ethical Inquiry core course.
 

Class: PHI  106 - Why Philosophize?- with John Giordano

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Th 5:35PM - 8:05PM

Location: Payson Smith 208*

*Prerequisite: a college writing course

Description: 
The course centers about the exploration of a single question: what it means to think philosophically. In the context of this question, we will examine what are the sources of philosophical thought and whether philosophy can justify its claim to be the foundation of all reflective endeavor. Prerequisite: a college writing course.

Ethical Inquiry core course.

 brainClass: PHI  225 -Philosophy of Mind-with Yishai Cohen

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Mon 4:10PM - 6:40PM

Location: Science Building 533* 

*Prerequisite: Any EYE or PHI 100 course or permission of the instructor

Description:
This course explores various theories of consciousness (mind-body dualism, physicalism, etc.) with a special emphasis on neutral monism, the view that matter has intrinsic properties that both constitute consciousness and serve as categorical bases for the dispositional properties described in physics. The course will also explore the ontological categories that best characterize consciousness. Ethical Inquiry core course.

 

Class: PHI 235- Philosophy, Social Media, and Security

Date: WINTER SESSION!!! 12/21/2018 - 01/18/2019

Time: Online asynchronous

*Prerequisite:  Any EYE or PHI 100 course or permission of the instructor.

Description: 
The course examines the moral and communicative dimensions of social interaction in a digital context that presumes adequate security. The focus is how social media transforms traditional ethical issues such as: truth, trust, privacy, autonomy.  We will also inspect notions of and tolls for network security. Prerequisite: Any EYE or PHI 100 course or permission of the instructor. 

Ethical Inquiry core course.

 
Class: PHI  241 -Philosophy & Politics of Work-with Jason Read

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Monday, Wednesday 11:45-1:00 PM

Location: Payson Smith 41*

*Prerequisite:  EYE course or 100-level PHI course or permission

Description: 
A course on the philosophy of work sounds like an oxymoron. What does making a living have to do with the search for a meaningful life? This course argues that has everything to do with. Work defines who we are in the eyes of others and ourselves. Work also makes up most of our daily experience of politics: it is in the world of work that we experience the reality of power, domination, hierarchy, and cooperation. Work is also central to such political ideas as property, equality, and justice. Last, but not least, there is the economic dimension of work, work creates wealth, but not for all. Work is thus an activity that stands at an intersection between philosophy, politics, ethics, and economics. Moreover, this intersection is constantly changing, as labor is transformed by technical conditions and economic decisions. This course will explore this intersection, examining the philosophical, ethical, and political dimensions of work. In doing so we will pay particular attention to the transformations of work in the last several decades, the shift from Fordist industrial labor to an economy dominated by services, information, and work of care and communication. We will also examine the demand for meaningful work, asking is such an ideal possible in a world dominated by automation and globalization. Readings will include:  Arendt, Hegel, Locke, Marx, Plato, Smith, and Weeks.  This course satisfies the Ethical Inquiry, Social Responsibility and Citizenship requirement.
 

Class: PHI 250-Philosophy of Science Instructor TBA

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Tuesday, 1:15-3:45

Location: 403 Luther Bonney*

*Prerequisite:  EYE or PHI 100 course or permission of the instructor

Description: 
An examination of two different models generally used in approaching scientific activity philosophically: the logical model and the historical model. Questions to be raised include whether these two approaches are mutually exclusive or whether one can subsume the other, and at what cost. Issues to be covered include description vs. explanation; scientific vs. non-scientific explanation; the issue of whether to include pragmatic and psychological dimensions of meaning in scientific explanations; the question of whether all facts are "theory-laden"; and the relationship between facts, laws, and theories in science.

 

Class: PHI 290-Problems in Philosophy-with Yishai CohenKermit's free will-hand

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Wednesday 4:10-6:40 PM 

Location: Payson Smith 211*

*Prerequisite:  Any EYE or PHI 100 course or permission of the instructor.

Description: 
The purpose of this course is to gain a deeper understanding of free will—the kind of control over one’s behavior that is required for moral responsibility. We will explore whether free will is compatible with determinism, whether free will requires the ability to do otherwise (i.e the ability to do other than what one will in fact do), and whether free will requires the unique power of “agent causation”.

 

Class: CMS 291 Death and Dying -with Sandra Dutkowsky

(2 sections)

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Asynchronous online

*Prerequisite:  EYE course or 100-level PHI course or permission

Description: 
Recent success in life-prolonging techniques has resulted in the creation of new disagreements over the proper definition of death. Which definition of death is the most adequate? Some have argued that dying, not death, is the vitally important topic. Has the term death changed its meaning from time to time and place to place in human history? This course will deal with these and similar epistemological issues.

Ethical Inquiry core course. 

 

Class: PHI 312 Morality in African Literature and Film- with Kathleen Wininger

(2 sections)

****Date: 01/22/19 - 03/10/19 (7 WEEKS!!)***

Time: Asynchronous online

*Prerequisite:  ENG 100, EYE course, or 100-level PHI course.

Description: 
PHI 312 /WGS 345 Morality in African Literature and Film is going to be an exciting and extremely varied course! Your work will involve seeing African films, lectures, TED talks, looking at African Art, reading philosophy and novels.  

Looking at gender in African cultures challenges the binary heterosexual norm of European science, law, and philosophy in a new way.   In many African cultures there are local types of gender fluidity and many languages do not use gendered pronouns. So although we will look at issues common in gender studies in America and Europe, some African theorists don’t think European models of gender or sexuality apply in African contexts.  We will pick issues that range over people’s lives including some that are not always looked at as gender-related in other cultures.

Intellectual, cinematic, and literary movements have had profound impacts on generations of thinkers in West, East, and Southern Africa. Important recent controversies in gender and decolonizing philosophy emerge as we explore African theory, fiction, and visual culture.  

Ethical Inquiry , Diversity, International

 
Class: PHI 350 American Philosophy-with Kenneth Knight

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Asynchronous online

*Prerequisite:  ENG 100, EYE course, or 100-level PHI course.

Description: 
History and background of the origin of philosophical ideas in America; particular emphasis given to Peirce, James, Royce, Dewey.

Class: PHI 380 Postmodernism and After-with Jason Read

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Tuesday, Thursday, 2:45-4:00 PM

Location: Payson Smith 306*

*Prerequisite Any EYE or PHI 100 course or permission of the instructor.

Description: 
Lately Postmodernism has been blamed for such contradictory phenomena as the rise of Donald Trump and the proliferation of identity politics. It is blamed for the loss of authority of truth, reason, and progress and the reduction of everything to language, power, and the play of appearances. Are such claims true, and how did a trend in academic philosophy get blamed for so many of the world's problems. This course will look at the history of postmodernism, examining the common themes, or problems, that link together this heterogeneous collection of philosophers.  We will focus on several themes: the simulation of reality, the role of language in shaping reality, the idea of politics as power relations, and the destruction of history. Finally, we will look at what remains of truth, politics, and philosophy after postmodernism. In the end our goal will be an attempt to view postmodernism as its time comprehended in thought, and to try to understand the current historical moment. Readings will include Jean Baudrillard, Judith Butler, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Donna Haraway,  Paolo Virno, and Slavoj Zizek.

 

Class: PHI 405-Major Figure Seminar in Philosophy: Nietzsche-with Kathleen Wininger

Date: 01/22/19 - 05/03/19

Time: Tuesday, 4:10-6:40

Location: Luther Bonney 241*

*Prerequisite:  Prerequisite for any 400-level seminar course is two (2) 300-level courses in philosophy or permission of the instructor.

Description: 
Friedrich Nietzsche has had an enormous and vital influence on European culture in general and philosophy in particular.   This course will look at Nietzsche's own work, including selections from Daybreak (Dawn), Human All Too Human, The Gay Science [Joyful Wisdom], Genealogy of Morals, Twilight of the Idols, Thus Spake Zarathustra, and various unpublished early and late writings. His legacy is seen in many and varied philosophers, i.e., Heidegger, Foucault, Cixous, Irigaray, Danto, Deleuze.  We will see films about his life and the people he influenced.

 

*All courses online or on Portland campus.