School of Education and Human Development

SEHD Course Descriptions

School of Education and Human Development Course Listing

Undergraduate

EDU (Education)

EDU 100 Exploring Teaching as a Profession

An introduction to the study of education and teaching, this course provides opportunities for students to examine and evaluate their interest in and aptitude for a career in teaching.  The structure of the course combines faculty-directed seminars with coordinated field-based experiences in school settings.  In addition to examining and reflecting upon their field-based classroom experiences in their seminar sessions, students will examine the following topics: current initiatives and issues in education and teaching, the diverse needs of students, the multiple roles of teachers, the professional and ethical expectations of teachers, school curriculum, culture and organization, and teacher certification programs and professional development options.  Part of the course will be field based school experiences. Cr 3.

EDU 222 Foundations of Language and Literacy Development

This course is designed to examine theories and processes related to language and literacy development, and the implications of these theories and processes for curriculum and instruction, grades preK-12.  The course includes a 24-hour school-based field experience. All students are required to be fingerprinted prior to enrolling in a course with an accompanying field experience and/or internship placement. Prerequisite: HRD 200, or department permission. Cr 3.

EDU 230 Teaching Through the Arts

This course focuses on integrating art-based teaching and learning across the p-12 curriculum. It will give insight to comprehending a visual language in both students and teachers, by using developmentally appropriate art practices, which foster creative connections and studio habits of mind. This course requires arts-based field experiences to be arranged during the semester. Prerequisite: EYE course. Cr 3

EDU 300 Educational Media and Technology

An examination of educational media and technology with special emphasis on school-based developments and applications. Cr 3.

EDU 305 Foundations of Cultural and Linguistic Diversity

This course supports students in exploring and critically analyzing topics, themes, and issues related to cultural and linguistic diversity and helps them build a strong theoretical and practical foundation for becoming successful multicultural educators. 12 hours of fieldwork will be required. All students are required to be fingerprinted prior to enrolling in a course with an accompanying field experience and/or internship placement.  Prerequisite: HRD 200: Multicultural Human Development. Cr 3.

EDU 310 What is the Purpose of Schooling in a Democracy?

This course explores the role of public schooling in the United States and world with respect to ethical dimensions of equity and justice. Using a framework of education rights for a democracy, students analyze ethical dilemmas found in texts, videos, and personal stories, engage in multicultural field experiences, and present grounded perspectives in response to the question in the course title. A 12-hour field placement is required for this course. . All students are required to be fingerprinted prior to enrolling in a course with an accompanying field experience and/or internship placement.  Prerequisites: any EYE, ENG 100 or ENG 104. Cr 3.

EDU 323 Independent Study in Teacher Education

This course provides students the opportunity to pursue a project independently, planning and exploring an area of interest within the field of teacher education. Most independent study projects are library based; all are intellectually sound and reflect a high caliber of performance. Specific content and methods of evaluation are determined in conjunction with the instructor. An approved proposal is a necessary prerequisite to registration. Prerequisite: matriculation in an education program and junior or senior standing. Cr 1-3.

EDU 324 Student Teaching

For students matriculated in a USM undergraduate teacher education program in music education, technology education, or art education, a supervised student teaching experience of one full semester, carried out in an off-campus field setting, is required. Students must have met their program's requirements to register for student teaching. Prerequisites: vary according to major. This course requires health insurance. Cr 12.

EDU 336 Children's Literature

In this course, educators will examine the role of literature in literacy learning.  Emphases will be on the promotion of wide reading in a variety of genres and attending to the appropriate selection of literature to meet reading interests, needs, and abilities of elementary students. In addition to examining criteria for evaluating and selecting materials, participants will consider curriculum implications and learn creative strategies for teaching children’s literature and enhancing reading for elementary students. Cr 3.

EDU 401: Secondary Science Methods for All Students Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

The course has an interactive laboratory/discussion field-based approach, modeling and focusing on the teaching and learning aspects of science in the high school and middle school. The course emphasizes content, process, and methodology and will help interns develop knowledge of how to teach (pedagogy) and, more specifically, knowledge of how to teach science (pedagogical content knowledge). Students will learn strategies for planning and providing core academic and behavioral experiences to all learners. Pre-requisites: Open to matriculated undergraduate students in a USM teacher education pathway and concurrently placed in a student-teaching internship or by Teacher Education permission. Cr 3.

EDU 402 Secondary English Methods

This course focuses on ways to organize and teach English Language Arts classes at the middle and high school levels based upon current research in literacy and national and state standards in English Language Arts. Students will examine various strategies involved in designing and managing a student-centered English Language Arts class. They will explore and apply different theories for teaching English and create classroom activities to develop and expand upon students' capacities to read, write and speak effectively. Students will learn to see the necessary and important connections between reading and writing. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated interns in the Undergraduate Teacher Education program and interns in the ETEP program or by program permission. Cr 3.

EDU 404: Secondary Social Studies Methods for All Students Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course focuses on ways to organize and teach social studies courses at the middle school and high school levels. Students will examine various theories for teaching social studies, current research and national/state standards in order to link theory and practice and create a vision of social studies that promotes student-centered pedagogy, interdisciplinary thinking, issues of diversity, and relevance to students’ lives. Prerequisite: Open to matriculated undergraduate students in a USM teacher education pathway and concurrently placed in a student-teaching internship. Cr 3.

EDU 405 Teaching Mathematics K-8

This course provides experiences to develop and apply mathematical content knowledge and pedagogical skills in elementary and middle school classrooms. Major areas of focus include: how students learn mathematics, conceptual development of mathematical understandings, problem-solving instructional strategies, appropriate and effective uses of tools and technology, assessment of student learning, and providing equitable access to learning for all students. Prerequisite: open to students matriculated in the undergraduate teacher education pathways. Cr 3.

EDU 414 Improving Teaching in the Content Areas through Literacy for All Students Including Those with Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This content area literacy course focuses on helping students develop strategies for strategic, independent learning.  All students, including those with diverse abilities and culturally diverse backgrounds, will come to understand that learning is an active, constructive process.  Therefore, teachers of all subjects and grade levels will demonstrate knowledge and application of sound reading and writing strategies to enhance learning in the classroom. These strategies will create readiness for learning, use reading and writing to promote content understanding, and provide a means for assessing what has been learned.  Major emphasis is given to comprehension instruction, vocabulary acquisition, and metacognition. Prerequisites: Matriculated into a teacher education pathway or department permission. Cr 3.

EDU 442 Seminar in Teaching, Learning and Assessment

The primary purpose of Seminar II is to sustain a learning community where members of the cohort are supported in their internship through the assessment system. This course is based on helping the participants develop their personal philosophy of teaching and professional portfolio. Participants perfect their craft through ongoing discourse, reflection, and inquiry. Specific topics include instruction, lesson and unit planning, classroom management, assessment, diversity, technology, and professionalism. Prerequisite: open to students matriculated in the undergraduate teacher education pathways. Co-requisite: EDU 445. Cr 3.

EDU 445 Student Teaching in General Education

This course is a two semester supervised student teaching experience in applying knowledge and skills to the practice of teaching. A student teacher is assigned to a mentor teacher and classroom at an elementary, middle, or high school. The student teacher is under the direct supervision of a mentor teacher and a university supervisor. Semester One is a part-time classroom placement completed in conjunction with teaching methods courses. Semester Two is a full -time classroom placement. Prerequisites Undergraduate teacher certification pathway matriculation and eligible for student teaching, or permission of program. Cr 1-6.

EDU 451 Elementary Social Studies Methods for All Students Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course focuses on ways to organize and teach social studies courses at the elementary level. Students will examine various theories for teaching social studies, current research and national/state standards in order to link theory and practice and create a vision of social studies that promotes student-centered pedagogy, interdisciplinary thinking, issues of diversity, and relevance to students’ lives. nPrerequisite: Open to matriculated undergraduate students in a USM teacher education pathway and concurrently placed in a student-teaching internship. Cr 3.

EDU 452: Teaching Elementary Science to All Students Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course has an interactive laboratory and field-based approach that models the teaching and learning of science at the elementary and middle school levels. The course emphasizes content, process, and methodology. Students will learn how to implement multiple strategies to support scientific understanding of systems in the natural and designed world. Prerequisite: Open to matriculated students in an undergraduate USM teacher certification pathway or by Teacher Education Department permission. Cr 3.

EDU 465 Teaching Reading for All Students in Grades K-8, Including Those with Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

In this course, students will learn to use evidence-based instruction to teach reading in grades K-6. Students will examine theories and current research on reading development and process in order to effectively instruct and assess all readers, including students with special needs and from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Students will learn how to implement multiple strategies to support reading development and promote children’s proficiency in state standards. Additionally, digital literacies, reading across the curriculum, and ways to engage and motivate readers will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy [must be concurrently enrolled in EDU 445 (internship)], or LLC Department approval. Cr 3.

EDU 466 Teaching Writing for All Students Including Those with Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds.

In this course, students will learn to use evidence-based instruction to teach writing for all students. Students will examine theories and current research on writing development and process in order to effectively instruct and assess all writers, including students with special needs and from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Students will learn how to implement multiple writing strategies across various genres to support writing development and promote children’s proficiency in state standards. Additionally, students will explore the use of technology and participate in writing sessions to develop as writers and teachers of writing. Prerequisites: Admission to candidacy [must be concurrently enrolled in EDU 445 (internship)], or LLC Department approval. Cr 3.

ESL (English for Speakers of Other Languages)

ESL 006/016 Intensive Grammar

This course (3-4 sections) focuses on building a stronger foundation in the grammatical and editing skills necessary for more natural and accurate English, both oral and written. Through a series of grammatical exercises, meaningful drilling, and analysis of the structure of the English language, students will become more adept at producing a wider variety of language with a higher knowledge of use and form. The course will not only introduce new structures in language but also review and expand upon those already learned. (The credit for this course does not apply toward a baccalaureate or an associate’s degree.) Prerequisite: instructor permission. Cr 1.5.

ESL 007/017 Listening and Oral Communication/US Culture

This course (2 sections) focuses on cultural awareness and US culture as well as the improvement of the listening and oral skills that are necessary for the university classroom.  The primary goals of the course are to introduce students to various aspects of US culture and intercultural communication via oral discussions and listening activities. Additional goals are to assist students in achieving comprehensible pronunciation and gaining confidence in listening comprehension and speaking skills. Students will also be exposed to a wide variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures in context. (The credit for this course does not apply toward a baccalaureate or an associate degree.) Prerequisite: instructor permission. Cr 1.5.

ESL 008/018 Reading, Writing & Vocabulary

This course (4-5 sections) focuses on the improvement of the reading and writing skills that are necessary for the university classroom. The readings are from authentic sources and promote use of strategies for writing short reaction papers, summaries, and essays which are based on these readings. Informal journal writing is an integral part of the course. Students will also be exposed to a wide vocabulary and systematic overview of grammatical structure. (The credit for this course does not apply toward a baccalaureate or an associate degree.) Prerequisite: instructor permission. Cr 1.5.

ESL 009/019 Intensive Reading and Speaking Fluency

Intensive Reading and Speaking Fluency (2 sections) focuses on improving students’ fluency in both reading and speaking while learning about topics in United States culture, history and current events. Emphasis is on developing speed and comprehension in reading and listening to material drawn from texts, news sources, film and popular culture. Students will learn strategies for speaking in front of a group, compensating for accent, and conducting informational interviews. (The credit for this course does not apply toward a baccalaureate or associate degree.) Prerequisite: instructor permission. Cr 1.5.

ESL 098 Admissions Pathway Program Level I:   Intermediate/Advanced Grammar and Writing

This is an intermediate/advanced-level English language course for Admissions Pathway Program (APP) students whose first language is not English and/or who are multilingual writers.  This is a developmental course that will enable students to benefit from a stronger foundation in understanding and using English grammar correctly, a necessity for successful editing. Emphasis is on understanding the meaning, use, and form of common grammar structures needed for academic writing. Students will have a basic knowledge of English grammar, but will need more work on accurate production of English, both oral and written, through a series of grammatical, written, and oral exercises. This course prepares students for the more advanced ESL 102. (The credit for this course does not apply toward a baccalaureate or an associate degree.) Prerequisite: instructor permission. Cr 3.

ESL 099 Intermediate Reading, Writing, and Vocabulary

This is an intermediate-level English language course for students whose first language is not English. This is a developmental ESL course designed to help students compose fluent and accurate writing as used in academic settings. Students will develop a greater sense of confidence in using written English as a method of communication. Emphasis will be placed on achieving unity and coherence in written compositions and on understanding the mechanical aspects of the essay. Students will learn to read for meaning and to analyze authentic texts. Through reading, writing, and specific exercises, students will expand their grasp of vocabulary and idiom needed for academic work and progress into ESL 103. (The credit for this course does not apply toward a baccalaureate or an associate degree.) Prerequisite: instructor permission. Cr 3.

ESL 100 College Writing

This is a section of College Writing (ENG 100) which is intended for multilingual writers and/or non-native speakers of English only. Students read expository writing from diverse sources, engage in critical thinking, and utilize the writing process to compose essays and summaries. Coursework includes significant opportunities to improve grammar and usage, build academic vocabulary, and practice techniques involved in conducting secondary research, including using databases and MLA documentation. Successful completion of ESL 100 fulfills the College Writing CORE requirement and is the final course in the Admissions Pathway Program (APP) sequence. Prerequisites: ESL 104 & ESL 102 or college readiness in writing. Cr 3.

ESL 102 Admissions Pathway Program Level II:   Advanced Grammar and Writing

This is an advanced-level English language course for APP, multilingual writer students that focuses on building a stronger foundation of grammatical skills that will aid students in producing more natural and accurate writing skills in the English language. Emphasis is placed on understanding and using advanced grammar structures needed for academic writing and discussion at the university level. Through a series of grammatical exercises, meaningful drilling, both written and oral, short essay writing, and analysis of the structure of English, students will improve their academic writing and editing skills.   Prerequisite: ESL 98 or instructor permission. Cr 3.

ESL 103 Admissions Pathway Program Level I: Intermediate/ Advanced Reading, Writing, and Vocabulary

Designed for Admissions Pathway Program (APP) multilingual writers, this is a mid-advanced-level English language course which focuses on helping students produce grammatical, well-constructed, coherent English, in both written and spoken form. Based on the writing process, students will write and rewrite paragraphs and essays drawn from topical and academic reading, works of fiction, and class discussion. Students learn to read and analyze for content and style a variety of authentic works of fiction and non-fiction. A strong focus will be on enhancing the students' academic vocabulary. Prerequisites: ESL 99 or instructor permission. Cr 3 each semester, can be repeated for up to one additional semester for a total of 6 credits.

ESL 104 Admissions Pathway Program Level II:  Advanced Reading, Writing, and Vocabulary

This is an advanced-level English language course for APP, multilingual writer students that focuses on fine-tuning their reading and writing skills prior to taking College Writing. Much of the work done in this class will focus on reading academic literature, fiction and non-fiction, as well as on mastering the academic writing skills necessary for university work. Additional focus will be on vocabulary extension and the use of idiom. Students will be required to write short essays, keep a written journal, and make oral presentations in class. Prerequisite: ESL 103 and 10 l (co-requisite) or instructor permission. Cr. 3 each semester, can be repeated for up to one additional semester for a total of 6 credits.

HRD (Human Resourse Development)

HRD 200 Multicultural Human Development

This course introduces developmental theory and research which encompasses the entire life span.  Emphasis will be on prenatal development through adolescence, with an overview of adult development.  A multi-disciplinary view of human development will be taken which considers stability as well as change throughout the life cycle.  The interaction of hereditary and environmental factors will be considered in studying physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development.  Prerequisites: at least 30 credits. Cr 3.

HRD 310/510 Aging and the Search for Meaning

This course explores psychosocial and spiritual aspects of successful human aging. Multidisciplinary perspectives on aging will be examined including historical, psychological, sociological, cultural and religious. Learners will discuss key issues related to aging and the search for meaning through the lens of various genres (e.g., research, theory, fiction) as well as their own personal experiences. Prerequisite: HRD 310 students will be expected to have taken one college-level writing course and one sociology or psychology course. Cr. 3.

HRD 312  The Spiritual Challenges and Opportunities of Aging

This course explores the dynamic role spirituality plays in navigating the aging process. Within a holistic context spirituality provides a frame of reference for understanding both who we are and how we fit into the world around us.  Learners will develop a basic frame of reference for the nature of spiritual experience, including theory of adult spiritual development. But given the subjective nature of spirituality, it will be important for learners to develop tools for assessing the role spirituality plays in providing meaning for people as they age as individuals. Learners will begin this process by examining their own spiritual journey from psychosocial, cultural and religious perspectives. They will then use a parallel process to interview an older individual and assess the role spirituality plays in their aging process. Prerequisite:  HRD 312 students will be expected to have taken one college-level writing course and one sociology or psychology course.  Cr 3.

HRD 337 Peer Leadership Seminar

This course is intended for students who participate in organized student leadership programs or are interested in learning more about leadership within higher education organizations. The course examines the nature of higher education organizations, leadership theory, college student development theory, as well as both interpersonal and group communication skills. Through written and oral projects students learn how to integrate theory with practice. Assignments and projects draw their focus from the individual's particular interests regarding student leadership. Cr 2.

PHE (Athletic Coaching)

PHE 106 NCAA Life Choices

This course is designed for student athletes in their first or second year at USM. The goal of the course is to enable students to develop their academic potential and to realize their personal and athletic goals during their college experience. Through large and small group work, topical readings, and community service projects, students will clarify goals, values, healthy lifestyles, leadership, and study skills. Prerequisite: open to first- and second-year students only. Cr 3.

PHE 198 Physiology of Health Fitness

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a scientific background in exercise physiology and health concepts in order to develop and maintain a lifetime program of high-level physical fitness and quality health. Cr 3.

PHE 203 Athletic Training

This introductory course in sports medicine/athletic training will provide the student with information about prevention and management of sports-related injuries. The course is geared toward individuals involved in or pursuing allied health professions as well as coaching or teaching fields. Pertinent anatomy and common injuries will be discussed. This course will also include topics prescribed by the American Red Cross including respiratory emergencies, artificial respiration, wounds, poisoning, water accidents, drugs, burns, sport safety issues, and CPR. Successful completion will result in First Aid & CPR/AED certification. Cr 3.

PHE 302 Coaching Philosophy and Fundamentals

This course covers various approaches to planning, organizing, and implementing practice sessions in preparation for athletic competition. The psychological and emotional aspects of coaching are also investigated. One segment of the course will be concerned with society's view of coaching as illustrated by today's literature. Cr 3.

PHE 303 Coaching and Officiating Basketball

Coaching philosophy, coaching style, choosing a team, individual fundamentals, team play development, and the ability to organize and maintain a quality program will be stressed. The course will also cover rules of basketball and techniques of officiating. Cr 3.

PHE 309 Coaching and Officiating Track and Field

Part of the University of Southern Maine's coaching certification program, this course is designed to prepare students for track and field, and cross country coaching at the high school and/or middle school levels. Particular aspects of the sport will not be discussed in detail. Rather, the course is intended as an overview of coaching philosophies, sports science, and the training required for each event. Students will have an opportunity to explore areas of interest in depth. Cr 3.

PHE 311 Coaching and Officiating Soccer

The course will cover individual techniques and team tactics, drills to implement these techniques and tactics, practice and season organization and methods of starting, maintaining and improving programs at various levels. The course will also cover rules of soccer and techniques of officiating. Cr 3.

PHE 312 Coaching and Officiating Football

Emphasis on the methods of teaching and coaching football. Offense and defense, player-coach relationship, team selections, planning of practice sessions and game situations will be areas of concentration. The course will also cover rules of football and techniques of officiating. Cr 3.

PHE 314 Organization and Administration of Athletics

This course covers the principles and practices of athletic administration as related to middle schools, junior, and senior high schools. Cr 3.

PHE 315 Coaching and Officiating Field Hockey

Emphasis on the methods of teaching and coaching field hockey. Offense and defense, player-coach relationship, team selections, planning of practice sessions, and game situations will be areas of concentration. The course will also cover rules of field hockey and techniques of officiating. Cr 3.

PHE 316 Coaching and Officiating Volleyball

Emphasis on the methods of teaching and coaching volleyball. Offense and defense, player-coach relationship, team selections, planning of practice sessions, and game situations will be areas of concentration. The course will also cover rules of volleyball and techniques of officiating. Cr 3.

PHE 335 Coaching and Officiating Baseball

The course will cover individual and team techniques, drills to implement these techniques, practice organization and methods of starting, maintaining and improving programs at various levels. The course will also cover rules of baseball plus techniques of umpiring. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Cr 3.

PHE 336 Coaching and Officiating Softball

The course will cover individual and team techniques, drills to implement these techniques, practice organization and methods of starting, maintaining and improving programs at various levels. The course will also cover rules of softball plus techniques of umpiring. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Cr 3.

PHE 391 Field Experience/Internship

Practical field work in a coaching area. The student will be assigned as an assistant coach in a sport for a season. Supervision, evaluation, and guidance of the student will be provided by a staff member who is responsible for that coaching area. Prerequisites: PHE 203, PHE 302, PHE 314. Restricted to students in coaching certificate program. Cr 1-6.

PHE 398 Independent Study in Physical Education

Provides students who have demonstrated critical and analytical capability an opportunity to pursue a project independently, charting a course and exploring an area of interest, bearing upon it previous course experience and emerging with an intellectually sound, coherent synthesis reflecting a high caliber of performance. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Cr 1-6.

SED (Special Education)

SED 300 Ethics and Youth with Exceptionalities

In this course participants will examine the relationships between the 6 principles of IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) and the ethics of access. This course will focus on school-age youth with exceptionalities and their families through transitioning to post-secondary school.  Through the use of case studies and hearings/court decisions, panel discussions, and reflections, this course will focus on how these youth are marginalized in educational settings, and in general society, including students who are culturally and linguistically diverse. The course will also explore the multidisciplinary nature of schools and agencies: planning, assessment, services, their obligations, and the tensions that arise due to diverse points of view.  The course touches on the life span of living with a disability as well as historical perspectives. Cr 3.

SED 335 Students with Exceptionalities in General Education

The primary goal of this course is to construct an understanding and knowledge of the range of exceptionalities, including students with disabilities and/or those identified as gifted and talented. The course is based on the following premises: a) students with disabilities are guaranteed an appropriate education that includes engagement with typically developing peers and is based on the general education curriculum to the greatest extent possible; and b) students who are gifted and talented should be educated appropriately based on their academic and artistic abilities. Topics include characteristics of areas of exceptionality; planning and strategies for differentiating instruction and universal design; assistive technology; state and federal laws regarding students who are exceptional; working with families; Response to Intervention (RtI); and collaboration between all school personnel. This course includes a 6-8 hour field placement. Prerequisite: 54 credits or program permission. Cr 3.

SED 420 Multi-Tiered Systems Support (MTSS) in Education

This course introduces participants to the concepts of multi-tiered systems of academic and behavior support, from the schoolwide to the classroom perspective, including students with suspected or identified disabilities. Participants will develop an understanding of the defining characteristics of MTSS at Tiers 1 and 2: prevention-based, focus on student performance, data-based decision making and problem solving, continuous progress monitoring, and using a continuum of evidence-based interventions.  Students will develop classroom strategies for establishing a productive learning environment including establishing and teaching expectations, structuring the classroom, creating a system to acknowledge behavior and to address minor problem behavior. Prerequisite: SED 335 and concurrent with EDU 445 or by special education program permission. Cr 3.

SED 425 Multi-Tier Mathematics Instruction and Assessment

This course includes lectures, discussions, guided practice and applied learning experiences in the scope and sequence of progressively more intensive mathematics instruction and assessment for students with mathematics difficulties in kindergarten through grade 12, including students with diverse abilities and backgrounds.  Starting with the five foundations of math instruction (e.g., conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, productive disposition), the course describes the features of universal (e.g., Tier 1) core math instruction then provides guided practice and applied learning experiences to prepare teachers to use progressively more intensive math instruction based on student learning needs. Participants will learn how to select and use scientifically validated mathematics instruction and assessment practices for students needing supplemental (e.g., Tier 2) and intensive (e.g., Tier 3), and special education mathematics instruction and assessment.  Cr 3.

SED 427 Multi-Tier Reading Instruction and Assessment

This course includes lectures, discussions, guided practice and applied learning experiences in the scope and sequence of progressively more intensive reading instruction and assessment for students with reading difficulties in kindergarten through grade 12, including students with diverse abilities and backgrounds. Starting with the five foundations of reading instruction (e.g., phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension), the course describes the features of universal (e.g., Tier 1) core reading instruction then provides guided practice and applied learning experiences to prepare teachers to use progressively more intensive reading instruction and assessment based on student learning needs. Participants will learn how to select and use scientifically validated reading instruction and assessment practices for students needing supplemental (e.g., Tier 2), intensive (e.g., Tier 3), and special education reading instruction and assessment. Cr 3.

Graduate

 

EDU (Education)

EDU 501  Secondary Science Methods for All Students Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

The course has an interactive laboratory/discussion field-based approach, modeling and focusing on the teaching and learning aspects of science in the high school and middle school. The emphasis is on content, process, and methodology and will help interns develop knowledge of how to teach (pedagogy) and, more specifically, knowledge of how to teach science (pedagogical content knowledge). Students will learn strategies for planning and providing core academic and behavioral experiences to all learners. Prerequisites:  Open to matriculated ETEP interns or by Teacher Education Department permission. Cr 3.

EDU 502 English Methods for Secondary Teachers of All Students Including Those with Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course focuses on ways to organize and teach English Language Arts classes at the middle and high school levels for all students, including those with special needs and those who are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. It is based upon current research in literacy and national and state standards in English Language Arts. Students will examine various strategies involved in designing and managing a student-centered English Language Arts class. They will explore and apply different theories for teaching English and create classroom activities to develop and expand upon students' capacities to read, write and speak effectively. Students will learn to see the necessary and important connections between reading and writing. Pre-requisites: Open to matriculated students in the Undergraduate Teacher Education program and in ETEP or by permission of the Teacher Education Department Cr 3.

EDU 503  World Language Methods for all Learners Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of teaching and learning world languages at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. It is based upon current research and national and state standards with a central focus on communicative language teaching. Students examine theories of second language acquisition, techniques for teaching interpersonal, interpretive and presentational modes of communication, as well as literature and culture. The course explores task-based instruction, the use of culturally authentic materials, the integration of technology as well as means of performance-based assessment and grading. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in ETEP, the Modern and Classical Languages and Literature (MCLL) Education undergraduate Pathway, or by Teacher Education Department (TED) permission. Cr 3.

EDU 504 Secondary Social Studies Methods for All Students Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course focuses on ways to organize and teach social studies courses at the middle school and high school levels.  Students will examine various theories for teaching social studies, current research, and national/state standards in order to link theory and practice and create a vision of social studies that promotes student-centered pedagogy, interdisciplinary thinking, issues of diversity, and relevance to students’ lives.  Prerequisite: Open to matriculated interns in the ETEP program or by permission of the Teacher Education Department. Cr 3.

EDU 505 Teaching Mathematics K-8

This course, intended for those preparing to be K-8 teachers, provides experiences to develop, critique, and apply knowledge, skills, and research findings in mathematics, pedagogy, and mathematical learning theory in elementary and middle school classrooms. Major areas of focus include learning and assessment of all children, instruction to support all students' mathematical understanding, reasoning, communication, and collaboration; standards (national, state, and local); content integration; resources; issues; and the discipline's philosophical framework. Prerequisite: ETEP program admission. Cr 3.

EDU 512 Teaching Literature in Grades K-12

In this course, educators will examine the role of literature in literacy learning. Emphasis will be on the promotion of wide reading in a variety of genres and attending to the appropriate selection of literature to meet reading interests, needs, and abilities of students K-12. In addition to examining criteria for evaluating and selecting materials, participants will consider curriculum implications and learn creative strategies for teaching children's and adolescent literature and enhancing reading for all students. Participants will have the opportunity to develop projects and investigate areas of interest to fulfill their professional needs. Cr 3.

EDU 514 Improving Teaching in Content Areas through Literacy for All Students Including Those with Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This content area literacy course focuses on helping students develop strategies for strategic, independent learning.  All students, including those with diverse abilities and culturally diverse backgrounds, will come to understand that learning is an active, constructive process.  Therefore, teachers of all subjects and grade levels will demonstrate knowledge and application of sound reading and writing strategies to enhance learning in the classroom.  These strategies will create readiness for learning, use reading and writing to promote content understanding, and provide a means for assessing what has been learned.  Major emphasis is given to comprehension instruction, vocabulary acquisition, and metacognition. Cr. 3.

EDU 521 Digital Literacies and Education

In this course, students explore the use of technology in K-12 education with a focus on literacy in the 21st century. Learners gain insight and experience in the effective integration of technology in literacy education through experiential learning, discussion, readings, and design of lessons and activities. Students examine related educational and societal issues through both academic and mainstream lenses in the context of relevant standards. Cr 3.

EDU 522 Foundations of Language and Literacy Development

This course is designed to examine theories and processes related to language and literacy development, and the implications of these theories and processes for curriculum and instruction, grades preK-12.  The course includes practicum assignments to be completed during internship. Prerequisite: Matriculated into teacher education pathway or program approval. Cr 1-3.

EDU 525 Invitational Summer Writing Institute

This course is an introduction to the principles and practices of the Southern Maine and National Writing Projects.  Fellows (i.e., those enrolled as students in the course) will explore and reflect upon the craft of writing through reading and discussion, and will learn effective practices for the teaching of writing.  In addition, Fellows will produce portfolios of their writing, participate in writing groups, demonstrate writing strategies through various activities, and develop a philosophy on the teaching of writing. Prerequisite: by permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

EDU 526 Invitational Fall Writing Institute

This course builds on the principles and practices of the Southern Maine and National Writing Projects introduced in EDU 525, Invitational Summer Writing Institute.  Fellows (i.e., those enrolled as students in the course) will further explore and reflect upon the craft of writing through reading and discussion, and continue to learn effective practices for the teaching of writing.  In addition, Fellows will complete portfolios of their writing, participate in writing groups, demonstrate writing strategies through various activities, and develop a philosophy on the teaching of writing. Lastly, Fellows will engage in reflection and/or research to develop their teaching practice and to share their learning with others. Prerequisite: EDU 525. Cr 3.

EDU 529 Planning and Formative Assessment Practices to Meet Learning Expectations

Planning and Formative Assessment Practices to Meet Learning Expectations is a one-semester course, designed for the practicing teacher. It begins with an exploration of current research-based, outcomes-driven practices in the field as a means for enrolled teachers to examine their own classroom practices. Participants will consider the distinction between habits of work and academic achievement, using backward design to develop units and lessons and formative assessment tools rooted in district, state or national standards. They will begin to develop daily practices that intentionally encourage students to take responsibility for their learning. This course is designed specifically for practicing teachers in the K-12 system. Participants will consider their own current practices as they strive to ensure their work with students in all facets is rooted in the learning expectations. This work includes developing long term and daily learning targets, diagnostic and formative assessments, and exploring valid and reliable assessment methods that provide meaningful feedback and involve students in their learning.  Participants will share experiences and practices with each other, discuss and reflect upon relevant readings and apply learning in classroom settings.

EDU 530 Planning and Summative Assessment Practices to Meet Learning Expectations

Planning and Summative Assessment Practices to Meet Learning Expectations is a one-semester course, designed for the practicing teacher. Teachers will explore their own summative assessment practices to better align them with learning expectations. They will use backward design to develop summative assessment tools rooted in district, state or national standards, and assessment practices that intentionally encourage students to take responsibility for their learning. This course is designed specifically for practicing teachers in the K-12 system. Participants will consider their own current practices as they strive to ensure their work with students in all facets is rooted in the learning expectations. This work includes developing specific summative assessment tools and a classroom assessment system. Teachers will give specific attention to ensuring their assessment tools are valid and reliable. They will practice providing meaningful feedback and involving students in the assessment process.  Participants will share experiences and practices with each other, discuss and reflect upon relevant readings and apply learning in classroom settings. Prerequisites: EDU 529 or program permission. Cr 3.

EDU 532 Instruction and Assessment Practices to Empower Learners

In this course participants will examine the documented research that supports the effectiveness of specific instructional and assessment strategies and begin to learn how to shift to mind frames that support the most impactful use of these strategies. Students will then build their own units and assessments using well designed, high quality, and high impact instructional strategies and assessments. Participants will have the opportunity to design, use, and reflect on these strategies and assessments throughout the course as well as receive and act on feedback from peers and instructors through in-class discussions. This course is designed for the practicing teacher. Prerequisites: This course is designed specifically for practicing teachers in the K-12 system; EDU 529 and 530 or program permission. Cr 3.

EDU 533 Curriculum Design to Meet Learning Expectations

This course is the culmination of a four-course sequence. It is student-designed and supported through regular peer and instructor consultation. The self-designed final projects students completed for earlier courses in the sequence will inform their choices for this course. Students will meet in small consultation groups facilitated by the course instructor throughout the semester and independently with the course instructor as needed to design and develop their projects. Students each choose an appropriate audience to whom they share their final project as a means for making their work public. While the presentations are not assessed, all written projects will be assessed according to the Maine Teaching Standards. Prerequisites: This course is designed specifically for practicing teachers in the K-12 system; EDU 530, 531, 532 or instructor’s permission. Cr 3.

EDU 543 Professional Internship in Elementary Education

This course is a supervised, year-long, internship experience in applying knowledge and skills to the practice of teaching. Each intern is assigned to a mentor teacher at an elementary or middle school, ideally in a partner district. Under the direction and guidance of her/his mentor teacher and supervisor, the intern builds skills in planning and instruction, and formative assessment for day-to-day practice.  The internship includes a site-based seminar that meets throughout the year. This course is repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite: Open to students matriculated in ETEP or undergraduate teacher education pathways pursuing elementary certification; must show proof of fingerprinting/CHRC. Cr 1-3 for a total of 6 credits, can be repeated.

EDU 546 Planning and Assessment I

This is the first of a two course series designed for pre-service teachers to be taken concurrently with a school-based placement.  Students will examine national and local learning standards, striving to build an understanding of the sociopolitical context of standards-based learning from an equity perspective.  They will learn to build lesson plans and series of lessons for their grade level aligned with standards and child development. Students will develop a repertoire of assessment methods including diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments. They will learn to create an instructional practice predicated on communicating clear expectations, giving meaningful feedback, and involving students in assessment. Students will share experiences and practices with each other, discuss and reflect upon relevant readings and apply learning in classroom settings. Prerequisites:  Students must be matriculated into a graduate teacher certification pathway. Cr. 1-3 credit hours, may be allowed to repeat up to 3 credits.

EDU 547 Planning and Assessment II

This is the second of a two course series designed for pre-service teachers to be taken concurrently with a school-based placement. This course focuses on long term planning, communication about student progress (feedback and student-developed rubrics, self, and peer assessments.) Students will learn to build unit plans aligned with learning standards and assessment systems. They will share experiences and practices with each other, discuss and reflect upon relevant readings and apply learning in classroom settings. Prerequisites: EDU 546 and students must be matriculated into a graduate teacher certification pathway. Cr. 1-3 credit hours variable, may be allowed to repeat up to 3 credits.

EDU 550 Professional Internship in Secondary Education

This course is a supervised, year-long, internship experience in applying knowledge and skills to the practice of teaching. Each intern is assigned to a mentor teacher at a middle or high school, ideally in a partner district. Under the direction and guidance of her/his mentor teacher and supervisor, the intern builds skills in planning and instruction, and formative assessment for day-to-day practice.  The internship includes a site-based seminar that meets throughout the year. This course is repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite: Open to students matriculated ETEP or undergraduate teacher education pathways pursuing secondary certification; must show proof of fingerprinting/CHRC. Cr 1-3 for a total of 6 credits, can be repeated.

EDU 551 Elementary Social Studies Methods for All Students Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course focuses on ways to organize and teach social studies courses at the elementary level. Students will examine various theories for teaching social studies, current research and national/state standards in order to link theory and practice and create a vision of social studies that promotes student-centered pedagogy, interdisciplinary thinking, issues of diversity, and relevance to student lives. Prerequisites:  Open to matriculated interns in the ETEP program or by permission of the Teacher Education Department. Cr 3.

EDU 552 Elementary Science Methods for All Students Including Those of Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course has an interactive laboratory/discussion field-based approach, modeling and focusing on the teaching and learning aspects of science in the elementary and middle school. The emphasis is on content, process, and methodology. The course will be framed by the Department of Teacher Education's Core Practices, Maine's Learning Results, the National Science Education Standards, and by the students' goals about the teaching and learning of science. Students will learn strategies for planning and providing core academic and behavioral experiences to all learners and differentiated academic and behavioral experiences for learners with special needs. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in a graduate USM teacher certification pathway or by Teacher Education Department permission. Cr 3.

EDU 554 Secondary Mathematics Methods

This course, intended for those preparing to teach mathematics at the 7-12 level in the state of Maine, provides experiences to develop and apply mathematical content knowledge and pedagogical skills in middle and secondary school classrooms. Major areas of focus include: how students learn mathematics, conceptual development of mathematical understandings, problem-solving instructional strategies, appropriate and effective uses of tools and technology, assessment of student learning, and providing equitable access to learning for all students. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated students in ETEP, the Secondary Mathematics Education Teacher Education Pathway, or by ETEP program permission. Cr 3.

EDU 557 Teaching Writing to Multilingual Learners

This course focuses on developing and improving writing skills for English language learners (ELLs), by examining second language acquisition and writing theories and how they inform classroom practice. It is designed to equip teachers with the dispositions, knowledge, skills and strategies to implement writing instruction for ELLs at all levels of proficiency. Students gain firsthand experience using the writing process. They will draw on current research, theory, and classroom practice, leading to the development of instructional programs that will meet the needs of their ELLs. Cr 3.

EDU 558 Content-Based Curriculum for English Language Learners

This course focuses on the factors necessary for the development and implementation of relevant content learning for second language students of all age and proficiency levels in the public school setting. The course explores the theoretical background and models of strategies for insuring competent delivery of appropriate language and content in a multilingual context. A co-construction approach incorporating the backgrounds and experiences of course participants is the principal methodological approach. The framework of the course is a pedagogical focus that incorporates scaffolding, differentiated instruction, independent learning strategies, critical thinking, and assessment. Cr 3.

EDU 559 Aspects of Reading for Multilingual Learners

This course examines the role of literacy in the K-12 and adult classroom for linguistically and culturally diverse learners in local and global contexts. A critical analysis of the developmental nature of the reading process as it applies to young learners, as well as application to older learners with varying degrees of first language literacy, is a major emphasis. An examination of first language and cultural and linguistic diversity influences on reading in a second language and multiliteracies in the light of current applied linguistics research is also a major emphasis. Cr 3.

EDU 560 Aspects of Teaching English Language Learners in PreK-12 Schools

This course introduces PreK-12 teachers to aspects of teaching English language learners in schools. Teachers will explore culture as it affects student learning, language acquisition and development, how to plan and implement standards-based content and language instruction, and how to conduct classroom-based assessment of content and language learning. Students in this course should have access to a classroom with ELLs to complete course assignments. Cr 3.

EDU 561 Aspects of the English Language

This is a practical course for the prospective or continuing ESL teacher which will examine the various linguistic elements of the English language and their relevance to the teaching process of English as a Second or Other Language. We will be focusing on analyzing the grammatical and phonological aspects of the English language as well as looking at morphology and lexis, semantics, and such social aspects of the language as register and speech variation. Primary emphasis will be placed on a better understanding of English through class discussion, oral presentations, and practical application for teaching in the ESL classroom. Cr 3.

EDU 562 Linguistic and Cultural Diversity in the Classroom

This course examines the nature of language and cultural differences among learners of various ethnic and racial backgrounds. The exploration of diversity provides opportunities for participants to develop a personal awareness of the role of cultural conditioning in classroom encounters; to reflect on and to confront personal biases as they relate to teaching; to acquire the skills and resources for an ethno-relative approach to delivering instruction; and to make language- and topic-related choices compatible with learner differences. Cr 3.

EDU 563 ESL Testing and Assessment

The focus of this course is on learner-centered approaches to constructive evaluation of language and content. Emphasis is predominantly on authentic, performance-based assessment practices but also include the role of criterion-and norm-based formal testing procedures within a holistic evaluation framework. Comprehensive evaluation of language involves the whole learner, including an integrated approach incorporating socio-cultural, academic, and cognitive perspectives. Also included is an understanding of biases influencing formalized second language testing. Cr 3.

EDU 565 Teaching Reading for all Students in Grades K-8, Including Those with Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

In this course students will learn to use evidence-based instruction to teach reading in grades K-8. Students will examine theories and current research on reading development and process in order to effectively instruct and assess all readers, including students with special needs and from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Students will learn how to implement multiple strategies to support reading development and promote children’s proficiency in state standards. Additionally, digital literacies, reading across the curriculum, and ways to engage and motivate readers will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Must be matriculated in a graduate teacher education program, or LLC Department approval. Cr 3.

EDU 566 Teaching Writing for All Students Including Those with Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

In this course students will learn to use evidence-based instruction to teach writing for all students. Students will examine theories and current research on writing development and process in order to effectively instruct and assess all writers, including students with special needs and from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Students will learn how to implement multiple writing strategies across various genres to support writing development and promote children’s proficiency in state standards. Additionally, students will explore the use of technology and participate in writing sessions to develop as writers and teachers of writing. Prerequisite: Must be matriculated in a graduate teacher education program, or LLC Department approval. Cr 3.

EDU 599 Independent Study in Teacher Education

This course provides students the opportunity to pursue a project independently, planning and exploring an area of interest within the field of teacher education. Most independent study projects are library based; all are intellectually sound and reflect a high caliber of performance. Specific content and methods of evaluation are determined in conjunction with the instructor. An approved proposal is a necessary prerequisite to registration. Prerequisite: Matriculation into MTL program. Cr 3.

EDU 600 Research Methods and Techniques

This course studies the concepts, principles, and techniques of educational research with an emphasis on scientific inquiry and problem solving, designed for both the producer and consumer of educational research. Individual critiques and research reviews are completed. Prerequisite: open to matriculated students only. Cr 3.

EDU 603 Analysis of Teaching and Assessment

This course provides an opportunity to view teaching from the perspective of selected conceptual frameworks and research findings in the theory and practice of teaching and assessment. Analysis of individual teaching behavior and classroom assessment is an important aspect of this course. Cr 3.

EDU 604 Curriculum Development

This course provides students with an understanding of curriculum and curriculum development. Using a collaborative approach, teachers and administrators plan the design of a curriculum consistent with personal ideals and a given context. Students analyze the curriculum in terms of knowledge, skills, learning processes, and affective dimensions. Special emphasis is given to the processes of curriculum implementation and curriculum evaluation. Cr 3.

EDU 605 Testing and Assessment

This course develops students' knowledge of testing and assessment and provides opportunities for students to apply that knowledge to instruction and curriculum issues. Students will review the critical roles of educational leaders in testing and assessment. Participants will examine concepts such as curriculum alignment, opportunity to learn, equity, fairness, and effectiveness and relate these concepts to classroom assessments, as well as to district, statewide, national, and international standardized assessments. Students will address issues such as validity, reliability, and standard setting in the context of diverse perspectives about the construction, production, and interpretation of knowledge. Cr 3.

EDU 607 Teacher Research in Literacy and Language Development

The purpose of this course is to enable students to become generators of new contextualized knowledge through their own classroom-based research. Students will be introduced to major research paradigms and will learn and practice techniques of data collection and analysis. Naturalistic methods of studying literacy and language learning in real classroom contexts will be emphasized. Each student will generate a research question, design an empirical research study that will help answer the question, collect and analyze sample data, and summarize findings or revisions necessary to improve the study. The class will function as a community of researchers; a substantial portion of class time will be spent working in small groups. Prerequisites: EDU 565, EDU 620, or EDU 559 and EDU 566, EDU 626 or EDU 557 and open to matriculated students in the MSEd. in Literacy Education or TESOL, or by program permission. Cr 3.

EDU 612 Practicum/Seminar

This practicum/seminar, for experienced teachers in the teacher leadership program, is a two-semester, field-based project and concurrent seminar requiring a culminating activity in which the student utilizes the major learnings from the program in identifying and applying problem-solving strategies to a specific area of concern in a field setting. A written practicum report will be presented and discussed in an open forum. Cr 6 (3 credits each semester).

EDU 615 Middle Level Curriculum Organization

This course provides an opportunity to examine realities and possibilities of middle school curriculum design and content and to explore various longstanding controversies about the relationship between curriculum and the world, curriculum and learners, curriculum and the academic disciplines, and curriculum and educational aims. Moreover, it delves into conceptions of knowledge, knowing, and learning and into who has access to all three. The course investigates both middle school curriculum theory and curriculum practices, invites students to critique current and past approaches, and then develop a curricular approach of their own. It looks closely at the impact of curricular practices on the welfare of students and society. An important goal of the course is to provide opportunities for students to develop their own standards and naming the institutional contexts necessary for supporting those standards. Students should leave the course with a clear idea about what curricular approaches they think serve the welfare of middle school students and the larger society. Cr 3.

EDU 617 Teaching at the Middle Level

This course provides an understanding of the role the teacher plays in the intellectual, social, emotional, and personal development of young adolescents. Students investigate, try out, and evaluate responsive teaching strategies and explore the design and structure of advisor/advisee programs and curricula. Cr 3.

EDU 620 Reading Development and Instruction

Becoming a skilled reader is a developmental process. Although literacy acquisition is continuous, distinct stages of reading growth may be discerned as students become accomplished readers. The course provides a theoretical framework for sound instructional practices based on a cognitive, developmental perspective. Major emphasis is on using literature-based instruction. Current issues in the teaching of reading will be examined and the application of literacy practices to ESL, adult basic education, and special needs populations will be addressed. Suggested readings represent current research and practice. In addition to the texts, students are expected to read professional books and journal articles, synthesize information from readings, and generate implications for literacy instruction. Case studies and simulation exercises will be used to provide practical applications of the course content. This course is intended for classroom teachers, administrators, and other educators. Cr 3.

EDU 621 Literacy Problems: Assessment and Instruction

This course conceptualizes reading assessment as a process of becoming informed about learners. The course focuses on the development of diagnostic insights and corrective strategies for struggling readers of all ages. Current trends from research and practice are explored. Case studies and in-class practica help teachers implement effective procedures in the classroom. Cr 3.

EDU 623 TESOL Practicum

The practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages is designed to accommodate students in the TESOL program who are ESL teachers, mainstream teachers working toward ESL endorsement by the state, international students, adult educators, and other students matriculated into the MSEd in TESOL program. Students acquire practical ESL/EFL teaching experience in the field while applying knowledge gained through coursework and research; 40 hours of observation and practice teaching in an appropriate setting determined by the student and instructor are required. Students in the initial K-12 ESL certification concentration must complete their field experience in a public K-12 school. The 24 hours of program coursework must be completed prior to or concurrent with practicum. Prerequisite: matriculated into MSEd in TESOL; completion of 24 hours of program coursework, including EDU 557, EDU 558 or EDU 560, EDU 559, EDU 561, EDU 562, and EDU 563 Cr 3.

EDU 626  Writing Development and Instruction

This course emphasizes the advancement of writing through all the developmental stages in grades K-12. Writing growth and its relationship to reading and oral language development are examined. Current research and theory relating to the composition process is studied and implemented with students’ writing.  Students gain experience with writing process through participation in writing sessions. This course is intended for practicing teachers and other educators who support students’ writing development. Cr 3.

EDU 633 Special Applications in Literacy

Independent study opportunities to apply course experiences in field-based situations are encouraged. Considerable latitude is possible in pursuing options of professional interest with approval of an advisor. Examples of activities include: writing project (meeting standards of professional journals), intensive clinical experiences, educational consultation and research. Independent options must be approved in writing by the program coordinator. Cr 1-6.

EDU 634 Seminar in Literacy Research

The course provides a cultural-historical lens to literacy and reviews current research trends in literacy theory and practice. Students will review and analyze contemporary research. This course is intended to be the last class in the literacy education master's sequence (except EDU 639); CAS students may request permission to enroll. Prerequisites: By program permission. Cr 3.

EDU 635 Seminar in Second Language Literacy

This course integrates the knowledge base acquired in core ESL courses by focusing on the characteristics of a fluent second language reader and writer. There will be an analysis of first language reading models and their relevance to literacy acquisition in English as a second language. The impact of variables such as native language proficiency, perception, lexical knowledge, cognition, metacognition, and culture will be examined. This course is intended to be the last class in the TESOL master's sequence (except EDU 623); CAS students may request permission to enroll. Prerequisites: By program permission. Cr 3.

EDU 637 Contemporary Approaches to Literacy Leadership

This course will examine contemporary approaches to school-wide literacy and build capacity for teachers and school leaders to carry out the school’s literacy mission. It will offer direction and support to those charged with organizing and delivering effective literacy instruction to K-12 students, as well as adult education students. Topics will include the roles of literacy specialists, literacy coaches, and literacy interventionists; methods for working with struggling readers and writers and their teachers; strategies for assessment and analysis of data; theories of adult learning and development; strategies for leading professional development, peer coaching, and collegial support; ways to involve families and the community in literacy; and the changing design of our schools to best meet the needs of all students through culturally responsive leadership. Practicing teachers, literacy interventionists and specialists, school leaders, and adult educators are encouraged to enroll. Cr. 3

EDU 639 Practicum in Literacy Education

The Practicum in Literacy Education is designed to be an intense capstone experience that prepares candidates for endorsement as a literacy specialist. According to the International Literacy Association, literacy specialists are responsible for 1) developing, leading, or evaluating the school or district pre-K–12 reading and writing program, 2) supporting teacher learning, and 3) working with students who struggle with reading.  The practicum is intended to model an effective literacy program where graduate students assume these responsibilities and are expected to meet the competencies set forth by the International Literacy Association. Prerequisite:  21 credits in literacy coursework including the following literacy content courses: EDU 565 or EDU 620, and EDU 566 or EDU 626, and EDU 511 or EDU 513, and EDU 514, and EDU 621, and permission of the instructor. Cr 6.

EDU 640 Professional Internship in English as a Second Language

This internship is a full-time supervised student teaching experience in which interns will apply knowledge and skills to the practice of teaching ESL and culturally and linguistically diverse students. An intern completes a public school classroom placement working cooperatively with a mentor teacher and a university supervisor in addressing Maine’s Initial Teacher Certification Standards (InTASC and NETS-T) and TESOL Standards. The culminating event is a lead teaching experience during which the intern has primary responsibility for guiding the instructional program. An intern may pursue the internship part-time over two semesters if the hours are equivalent to a 15-week, full-time student teaching experience. The course is pass/fail, and students must pass 3 credits of internship to complete the program and be recommended for initial K-12 ESL certification. Prerequisites: Matriculation in the MSEd in TESOL, Initial K-12 ESL Certification program; 30 credits of program coursework, including EDU 623. Cr variable, up to 3; may be repeated one time.

EDU 643 Inquiry in Education

This three-credit course is designed as a capstone for the Masters in Teaching and Learning. This course is taken in the last semester of the MTL program. The course focuses on inquiry in the field of education including the development, implementation and evaluation of a research project focused on classroom practice or educational policy issues. Candidates completing special education or ESL certification will conduct research in their respective field. Prerequisites: EDU 600. Cr 3.

EDU 651 Instructional Strategies for Secondary Teaching

This course explores the historical, philosophical, and political foundations of contemporary secondary schools, pedagogy, and curriculum as a means to understand how instructional and curricular choices are made. It also assists students in developing a repertoire of instructional strategies through modeling, practice, and reflection. Students hone their skill in choosing and using student-centered, thinking-oriented instructional strategies, addressing students' diverse learning needs through varied learning activities. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated ETEP interns and by Teacher Education Program permission. Cr 3.

EDU 652 Curriculum Design for Secondary Teachers of All Students Including Those with Diverse Abilities and Backgrounds

This course is designed to help teachers learn to develop curriculum for units, grade levels and subject areas for all students at the middle and high school levels, including those with special needs and those who are from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Major areas of focus include the examination of existing curricula and some of the motivating factors that underlie those curricula, the backwards planning design process, curriculum mapping, and the development of a conceptual framework which demonstrates the interconnections of curriculum, instruction and assessment. Prerequisites: Content Methods Course (EDU 501 or 502 or 503 or 504 or 554) and matriculation in ETEP, or by Teacher Education Department permission. Cr 3.

EDU 659 Special Education Law for School Leaders

This course acquaints prospective school leaders at the building and district level with the general principles of special education law as found in the interpretation of constitutional and statuary provisions by the higher courts. Laws governing pupils, teaching personnel, administrators and boards of education will be stressed. Cr 3.

EDU 665 CAS Directed Study

This course provides CAS students with an opportunity to focus on long-term applied research projects near the beginning of their programs of study, rather than wait until they have completed their regular CAS coursework. Some students enter the program having embarked upon long-term projects that will positively impact their schools or school systems. This capstone option gives them the opportunity to combine work on those projects at the same time that they take other graduate courses in their individual CAS programs. This project will be carried out through the program, but the culminating synthesis should take place in the last academic year of the program. Cr 3-6.

EDU 667 Teacher Leadership Capstone

This course is designed for students who are completing the Teacher Leadership Program. It provides students with the opportunity to: (1) complete a capstone inquiry project in an area related to teaching and learning and that is of particular concern or interest, (2) to develop a final product that describes the topic of inquiry, methods, and findings or insights, and (3) to make public the process of inquiry and its results. The final product will take the form of an action research project. The course takes the form of a professional community where students and the instructor engage in collegial interaction, peer learning, and reciprocal feedback. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 24 of 30 credits towards the Ms. Ed in Teacher Leadership. Cr 3.

EDU 670 Introduction to Educational Leadership

This course is designed to be the first course taken in the educational leadership program which may lead to certification as a principal, special education director, or curriculum coordinator. The course has two major foci: the characteristics of good leadership and the skills of effective educational leadership. Since many students who enroll in this course are exploring a career transition into administration, a goal of the course is to give participants a clear understanding of the decisions faced by educational leaders, the skills and knowledge necessary to perform effectively, and to give participants an opportunity to explore strategies for balancing the demands of the job, personal commitments, and responsibilities. Cr 3.

EDU 671 Organizational Behavior

This course will explore the interactions between individuals and the systems in which they live and work. Organizational behavior is the utilization of theory and methods of academic disciplines for understanding and influencing behavior in people in organizations. Individual and group level of analysis are included in covering such topics as diversity, perception, communication, motivation, power, group development and performance, innovation, quality, individual effectiveness and development, leadership, and intergroup behavior. Cr 3.

EDU 677 Seminar in School Management

This course, through the use of case studies, simulations, readings, presentations, and discussions will focus on students: (1) learning the nuts and bolts needed for daily management, (2) examining current issues facing the principalship, (3) learning strategies for managing and understanding oneself within the principal's role, (4) studying specific financial skills required of the principal and, (5) articulating positions on current educational practices, and developing an educational leadership philosophy. Prerequisite: instructor permission. Cr 3.

EDU 678 School Law

This course acquaints students with general principles of school law as found in the interpretation of constitutional and statutory provisions by the higher courts. Laws governing pupils, teaching personnel, and boards of education and special education will be stressed with particular emphasis on Maine school law. Cr 3.

EDU 679 Evaluation and Supervision of Teaching

This is an introductory course focused on evaluating and supervising teaching performance. As the teaching students may supervise ranges from preschool through adult education in a variety of subject areas, this course offers a framework of supervisory concepts and asks students to apply these concepts to the settings and clientele they would likely encounter. The major product of this course is a platform for articulating one's beliefs and espoused practices for evaluating and supervising teaching in a setting specified by the student. Cr 3.

EDU 680: Professional Learning in Schools

This course is designed for students in educational administration and teacher leadership. It examines the theory and practice of promoting professional learning in schools. Building on current research on adult development, professional learning communities, organizational capacity-building, and school improvement, students develop an understanding about professional learning and development, including purposes, models, theories, strategies, designs, and assessments. Students design and implement a final project, which demonstrates course learning in a school setting. Cr 3.

EDU 683 School Finance

This course provides a working knowledge and understanding of Maine state law and of school system finances and the funding process. An historical perspective is explored as well as current issues and problems on a statewide and national level. Specific emphasis is given to revenue generation and distribution, state and federal influences, local tax issues, budget development, budget management, and budget administration and control. Cr 3.

EDU 685 Internship in School Administration

This three-semester, nine-credit course (three credit hours each semester) combines the 240-hour internship field experience with the development of an applied research project in educational administration. The early focus of the course is on the internship in a school setting designed jointly by the student, the internship supervisor, and a school-based field supervisor. The internship is designed to encourage application of formal coursework to the management issues that face school leaders in the workplace. Out of the internship activities students complete a journal, develop a leadership platform (portfolio), conduct an investigation on an aspect of financial management and a study of community demographics and formulate a leadership project based on an issue of importance to the school. Each student will be required to produce a written report on the project and to defend it verbally at the conclusion of this course. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Cr 9.

EDU 686 Internship in Special Education Administration

This three-semester nine-credit course (three credit hours each semester) serves as the capstone experience in the educational administration program for aspiring special education directors. The internship is designed to immerse the student in the everyday tasks of the special education director, providing an opportunity for the student to actually apply the skills and knowledge gained throughout the educational leadership program. The early focus of the course is on the internship in a district setting designed jointly by the student, the internship supervisor, and a district special education director. Out of the internship activities students complete a journal, develop a leadership platform (portfolio), conduct an investigation on an aspect of financial management related to special education and a study of community demographics/child find and formulate a leadership project based on an issue of importance in special education at the school or district level. Each student is required to produce a written report on the leadership project and to present it at the conclusion of the course. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Taken at the conclusion of a student's program. Cr 9.

EDU 687 Internship in the Superintendency

This two–semester, six-credit course (three credits each semester) is designed to immerse the student in the everyday tasks of the superintendent of schools providing an opportunity for the student to actually apply the skills and knowledge gained throughout the educational leadership program. This course, made up of field experiences in the school superintendency, is designed to meet certification requirements and to prepare individuals for the position. The internship is designed to encourage application of formal coursework to the leadership and management issues that face superintendents in the workplace. Out of the internship experience, students will develop a project, in which they will be expected to take a leadership role in designing, implementing, and assessing a project that addresses an important district-wide educational issue. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Program capstone. Cr 6.

EDU 688 Internship in Curriculum Administration

This three-semester, nine-credit course (three credits each semester) serves as the capstone experience in the educational leadership program for aspiring curriculum coordinators. The internship is designed to immerse the student in the everyday tasks of the curriculum coordinator, proving an opportunity for the student to actually apply the skills and knowledge gained throughout the program, The early focus of the course is on the internship in a district/central office setting designed jointly by the student, the internship supervisor, and a curriculum coordinator. Out of the internship activities, students complete a journal, develop a leadership platform (portfolio), conduct an investigation on an aspect of financial management related to special education and a study of community demographics and formulate a leadership project based on an issue of curriculum/instructional importance to the district/school. Each student is required to produce a written report on the leadership project and to present it at the conclusion of the course. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Program capstone. Cr 9.

EDU 695 Special Topics in Teacher Leadership: Coaching and Mentoring Teachers

This course is designed for students in the Teacher Leadership Program. It will serve students who enroll in a cohort concentration through the Teacher Leadership Program, providing them with the opportunity to become familiar with a topic of common interest or concern that lays the foundation for future study. Special topics may include such topics as coaching and mentoring teachers, STEAM education, English education, etc. The course takes the form of a professional learning community where students and the instructor engage in collegial interaction, peer learning, and reciprocal feedback. Cr 3.

EDU 699 Independent Study

This course provides an opportunity for students to pursue a topic of interest on an independent basis. The specific content and evaluation procedures are arranged with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of supervising instructor and the department chair. Cr var.

EDU 701 Foundations of Education Policy and Research

This six hour, two-semester course follows PPM 707.  It focuses on selected educational reform policies from historical, social, and political perspectives and the research designs that are appropriate for studying them empirically. Students will engage in careful readings and critical analyses of primary, empirical, and peer-reviewed studies of educational reform policy formation and implementation, and they will examine appropriate designs for doctoral research along these lines. The reform policies that will be considered will reflect recurring issues and the dilemmas they pose for educational leaders. These include, but are not limited to: multiple and conflicting educational aims and purposes, upgrading the teaching profession (preparation, recruitment, retention, development), evaluating student achievement and teaching effectiveness, reducing inequalities in student opportunities and outcomes, and the interplay between corporate and non-corporate models of schooling. The following research designs will be emphasized: qualitative and mixed methods case studies, interview studies, content analyses, survey research, correlation studies, experimental studies, and ex-post /causal comparative studies. As part of the course, students will be introduced to doctoral faculty and their areas of research. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Ph.D. program and successful completion of PPM 707. Cr 6 (three each semester).

EDU 702 Contemporary Issues in Education Policy and Leadership

This course builds on EDU 701 and examines the role of the local, state, and federal government in creating educational policy to address contemporary education-related issues, and the impacts and challenges they pose for leadership in the context of federal, state, and local environments. As a group and individually, students will engage in careful readings and critical analyses of position papers, primary, empirical, and peer-reviewed studies that deal with current issues in educational policy drawn from various topics and from diverse political paradigms. Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU 701. Cr 3.

EDU 705 Data Collection and Analysis in Education Research

This six hour, two-semester course follows EDU 701.  This course focuses on mixed methods for conducting research in education policy and leadership.  The course’s emphasis is on the quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis that are appropriate for studying issues in the fields of education policy and leadership.  Students will develop research questions and appropriate data collection and analysis methods for studying these questions.  The following research designs will be emphasized: qualitative and mixed methods case studies, interview studies, survey research, correlation studies, experimental studies, and ex-post /causal comparative studies.  Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Ph.D. program and successful completion of EDU 701. Cr 6 (three each semester).

EDU 706 Evidence Based Analysis: Policy, Programs, and Accountability Systems

This course focuses on conducting evidence-based reviews and analyses of the design, implementation, and impacts of current international, national, and state education policy, policy initiatives, and education reforms. Using the frameworks articulated by researchers and policy analysts such as Canon, Rushcamp & Freeman (1990), Spillane (1996), Hill (2001), students will analyze approaches countries, states, and school districts take in implementing education policy. Phase I of the course will focus on an analysis of educational reform efforts in American states as well as comparisons of US national efforts with those of other countries. Review of international assessment systems and educational commentary will be examined in light of reform efforts. Phase II of the course will focus on using evidence from Phase I to construct accountability systems for monitoring and assessing the impacts of reform efforts both nationally and in Maine. Students will examine state and local policy implementation, develop accountability systems, and present their reports to state policy makers.  Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU 701. Cr 6 (three each semester).

EDU 708 Dissertation Proposal Seminar

This course is designed to lead students through the process of completing a dissertation proposal. At the end of the course, students will have completed a dissertation proposal that includes: a problem statement, complete research review, a research question, hypotheses, if appropriate and a methodology section. The course will address each of the proposal components in a recursive fashion, developing, sharing, and refining of content. Students will be expected to work closely with their dissertation chair in finalizing the proposal. Successful completion and dissertation committee approval of the proposal are prerequisites for continuation toward the dissertation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU 706 and EDU 707. Cr 3.

EDU 799 Dissertation in Education

This course is designed to lead students through the process of completing a dissertation. At the end of the course, students will have completed a dissertation that includes: a problem statement and research questions, a review of research, data collection and analysis, findings and implications. The course will address each of the components in a dissertation in a recursive fashion, developing, sharing, and refining of content. Students will be expected to work closely with their dissertation chair and other committee members in finalizing the dissertation. Students must register for a total of nine dissertation credits to graduate. Successful completion of the dissertation and oral presentation to the dissertation committee and their approval are prerequisites for completing the Ph.D. (9 credits required). Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU 708. Variable credit of 1-6 for a total of 9 credits.

HCE (Counseling)

HCE 500 Orientation to the Counseling Profession

This introductory course is designed to acquaint individuals who are preparing to enter the counseling profession with a broad overview of the profession's historical and theoretical foundations and to begin the development of their professional identities. This course must be taken the first semester following matriculation. Cr 3.

HCE 507 Spirituality and Religion in Counseling

This course will address, in an ecumenical and inclusive format, the growing renaissance in the psychotherapeutic community and in the larger American society of the integration of spirituality and religious values. Various aspects of spirituality and religion will be explored as they relate to the counseling process. The course will seek to increase the awareness of counselors to potential areas of client concern, including spiritual journeys, early religious training, search for meaning, personal relationship with the divine, and death and bereavement. Participants will explore various religious and spiritual practices, including, but not limited to, Islam, Buddhism, Native American beliefs, Hinduism, Christianity, and Judaism. Cr 3.

HCE 510 Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling and Services

This course will provide an orientation to the counseling profession, focusing on rehabilitation concepts, services, and settings. Included will be: history, trends, and related legislation; critical components of the rehabilitation process; contemporary counselor roles and functions; professional education, associations, standards, and credentials; ethical and legal issues; technology issues and practices; and rehabilitation agencies and services. Field visits and the examination of rehabilitation services from various participant perspectives will be required. Cr 3.

HCE 514 Principles of Psychiatric Rehabilitation: Evidence-Based Practices and Treatment

The purpose of this course is to understand the origins, philosophies, contexts, and methods of mental health services referred to as psychiatric rehabilitation. Content will include dissonant and changing mental health definitions, historical emergence of psychiatric rehabilitation, promising and evidence-based practice, consumer-survivor movement and impact, concepts of recovery, empowerment, and community, family issues and roles, societal myths and stigma, and varied professional functions. PSR models that are proven effective are integrating treatment with rehabilitation, are now being acknowledged as evidence-based practices by SAMHSA. The course will also address how psychiatric rehabilitation is applied in situations involving housing, education, social relationships, substance abuse, and community membership. Cr 3

HCE 520 Expressive Arts in Counseling

This course will provide an introduction to the Expressive Arts modalities within a wide range of counseling contexts, with an emphasis on dance therapy, music therapy, art therapy, and psychodrama.  The focus of the course will be on practical applications of arts modalities, as well as the integration of these modalities with verbal counseling approaches. Cr. 3.

HCE 604 Career Development

This course examines the ways in which counselors assist people of all ages in their life/career development. Emphasis will be on understanding theories, information systems, materials, activities, and techniques for fostering career awareness exploration, decision making, and preparation. The interrelationships among work, family, and other life roles, including multicultural and gender issues, will also be addressed. Cr 3.

HCE 605 Psychological Measurement and Evaluation

This course focuses on group tests and related measurement techniques. The course content includes a review of the history of testing, current issues, fundamental statistics for understanding, evaluating, and using tests, including selected aptitude, intelligence, achievement, interest, and personality tests. A variety of standardized and non-standardized evaluation measures will be reviewed. Cr 3.

HCE 607 School Counseling Programs and Services

This course is intended for those preparing to be school counselors. It is designed to consider the conceptual framework for comprehensive developmental school counseling practices in elementary and secondary schools. Major areas of focus include program management, guidance curricula, individual planning and advising, and responsive services that are organized to meet the educational, personal, and career needs of students.  Prerequisite: Open to matriculated graduate students in the counselor education program or by special permission of the instructor.  Cr 3.

HCE 609 The Practice of School Counseling

This course will provide students with an introduction to the practices of consultation and large group guidance for counselors working within a developmental model of school counseling. Assignments will incorporate field experiences that promote reflective learning and skill building. Prerequisite: open to matriculated students or by permission of instructor. Cr 3.

HCE 611 Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disability and Rehabilitation

This course explores the medical and psychological issues surrounding the concepts of disability and rehabilitation. Particular emphasis will be given to examining: a) the medical model as an organizing framework for viewing disability and rehabilitation; b) the diagnoses and treatment of various physical, developmental, sensory, and emotional conditions; c) the perspectives and responses of people with disabilities toward their diagnosed conditions and prescribed treatments; d) the principles and practice of functional assessment; and e) the ethical issues surrounding medical and rehabilitation services. Also examined will be psychological explanations of disability, their applications, and their implications for rehabilitation practice. A primary focus throughout the course will be on highlighting the perspectives that people with disabilities hold toward their life situations as well as the medical and rehabilitation settings and professionals they encounter. Cr 3.

HCE 612 Multicultural Counseling: Social & Cultural Foundations of Helping Diverse Families  

This course focuses on developing multicultural awareness, understanding influences of culture and worldviews across the life cycle, examining issues of diversity, i.e., race, ethnicity, gender, age and disability in human interactions and recognizing attitudes and perceptions of diverse populations.  The effects of developmental, bio-psychosocial changes including disability on individuals and their families within a cultural context are explored. The course examines worldviews, values and beliefs about diverse groups reflecting differences in race, ethnicity, gender, age and disability and family dynamics within a pluralistic society. Students will develop multicultural awareness of counseling competencies relative to diversity including disability, within rehabilitation and counseling practice. The course also introduces cultural foundations of human growth and development, and effects of cultural values and traditions across the lifespan. Implications for counseling the culturally different introduces a framework to guide rehabilitation and counseling professionals in serving diverse populations and their families, inclusive of differences in race, ethnicity, gender, age and disability.  A field experience of 15-20 hours with an associated report is required. Cr 3.

HCE 615 Vocational Counseling and Placement in Rehabilitation

This course encompasses the theoretical foundations of vocational counseling, the vocational implications of disability, the application of occupational and labor market data, and vocational choice with rehabilitation consumers. The use of job selection, analysis, and modification, and matching skills in the development of work and career options for persons with disabilities is included. The course also presents the role, functions, and strategies used by rehabilitation professionals in job placement and the supported employment of persons with severe disabilities. Accommodation of rehabilitation consumers in accordance with federal statutes, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), is examined in the context of a multicultural society. Cr 3.

HCE 619 Recovery-Oriented Origins of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practice

This course covers the historical, scientific, professional, and societal beliefs that have surrounded diagnostic psychiatry and the concepts of recovery from mental illness. Particular emphasis is given to recovery-oriented standards of care, ex-patients movement, legal rights and protections, medications, alternative treatments, trauma, and ethical issues in service delivery. Students will also explore their own values and motives for entering the field and examine the strengths and liabilities they may bring to their work. Cr. 3.

HCE 620 Fundamentals of Counseling Theories

This course is for those who are or will be engaged in counseling in an educational or mental health setting. Selected theories and related techniques are closely examined. Research literature that has a bearing on the effectiveness and non-effectiveness of counseling is reviewed. Cr 3.

HCE 621 Fundamentals of Counseling Skills

This course emphasizes the development of fundamental counseling skills, such as attending behavior, listening, reflection of feeling, paraphrasing, and questioning. The course examines the process and content of the counseling interview as well as verbal and nonverbal factors that influence the interactions within the counseling relationship. The primary focus is to help the student develop greater self-knowledge and skills in interpersonal communication within the counseling relationship. Prerequisite: Open only to matriculated graduate students; HCE 500 (for school counseling and mental health counseling concentrations, HCE 510 (for rehabilitation counseling concentration), and HCE 620 or instructor permission. Cr 3.

HCE 622 Counseling Children and Adolescents

This course examines selected theories, related techniques, and skills for counseling children and adolescents. Attention is given to examining personal philosophies about working with children and adolescents and to the exploration of possible interventions for various counseling situations with these populations. Counselor effectiveness literature is reviewed. Prerequisites: matriculation in counselor education or school psychology and HCE 620 and HCE 668 (HCE 668 may be taken concurrently with permission of the instructor). Cr 3.

HCE 623 Theories and Applications of Play Therapy: Summer Institute

This intensive, one-week summer institute presents an overview of the various theories of play therapy and examines them in the social, cultural, and economic contexts in which they were first implemented. Applications of the theories to special settings and with special populations are explored. The course is an introductory course and is one of the required courses for becoming a registered play therapist. Cr 3.

HCE 624 Child-Centered Play Therapy

This course is intended for students who wish to use a child-centered theory of play therapy in counseling children. It presents the theoretical framework of a child-centered approach to working with children and begins the necessary training for skill development in using this theory. Prerequisites: HCE 621 and HCE 622. Cr 3.

HCE 625 Adlerian Play Therapy

This course will examine Adlerian theory as it applies to clinical work with children and adolescents. Topics will include an overview of Adlerian theory and of play therapy, consultation with parents and teachers, encouragement, setting limits, understanding the goals of discouraged children, phases of therapy, and ethical and legal implications. Classes will include brief lectures, skill building exercises, discussion, and reflection. Prerequisite: graduate-level status. Cr 3.

HCE 626 Group Process and Procedures

This course focuses on basic principles of group development and on dynamics of group interaction. The improvement of facilitative skills is emphasized. Open to matriculated graduate students only. Cr 3.

HCE 627 Group Counseling Practicum

This course focuses on the development of concepts, attitudes, and skills necessary to lead counseling groups effectively in a variety of settings. Integration of group dynamics with counseling theory and group techniques is emphasized. Additionally, the behavior of the leader and participants is analyzed to promote a deeper understanding of group roles and functions. Prerequisites: HCE 621 and HCE 626 or by permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

HCE 640 Professional Issues for Mental Health Counselors

Mental health clinics, hospitals, substance abuse facilities, and social service agencies are among the various organizations involved in helping people through mental health counseling. This course examines the mental health needs of people in rural and urban communities and the views of mental health counseling held by those organizations who serve these people. Students will examine problems that organizations encounter in helping people and the consequences of services that interfere with helping. Attention is given to inter-professional and inter-organizational approaches to improving the quality of mental health counseling. Mental health counselor roles, functions, professional associations, credentialing, and ethical standards will also be examined. A special emphasis of the course is on examining mental health counseling from a historical, ethical, legal, philosophical, and developmental perspective. Cr 3.

HCE 641 Mind/Body Techniques

This course addresses the relationship between cognitive processes and physiology from a healing/personal wellness perspective. Various aspects of Eastern thought/religion, as well as Western behavioral medicine are explored in regard to physical health and emotional well-being. Research on the mind/body relationship is reviewed and discussed. Participants will be required to learn and practice meditative and mind/body techniques. Cr 3.

HCE 642 Perspectives on Chemical Dependency

This course focuses on the overall dynamics of chemical dependency and will serve as an introduction to understanding the various stages, processes, and effects of such addictions. Specific topics will include social and psychological dynamics of chemical dependency involving family, peers, and co-workers. The roles that professional educators, human service workers, and other helping professionals play in prevention, early intervention, and the various approaches to recovery and aftercare are considered in depth. Cr 3.

HCE 643 Psychopharmacology, Substance-Related Disorders & Integrated Co-Occurring Treatment

This course is designed to provide participants from non-scientific backgrounds with a basic understanding of the effects of licit and illicit drugs.  In addition, the role of these drugs in distorting brain chemistry and promoting substance-related disorders will be explored.  Relationships between co-occurring substance-related disorders and mental illnesses will be explored. Research on effectiveness of treatment and rehabilitation of persons with co-occurring disorders will be reviewed.  Interactions among the biological, psychological/emotional, and behavioral aspects of substance abuse will be examined in relation to symptom reduction and identification, intervention strategies, and the treatment of substance use disorders particularly for people with mental illness. Cr. 3

HCE 644 Crisis Intervention

This course introduces students to the theory and practice of crisis intervention. A theoretical perspective is established, and short-term crisis counseling strategies are examined. Several different crisis situations will be discussed in relationship to agencies or persons responsible for interventions. Prerequisite: HCE 621 or by permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

HCE 645 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning

This course focuses on the diagnostic systems and their use in counseling. The development of treatment plans and the use of related services are reviewed. The roles of assessment, intake interviews, and reports are examined. Prerequisite: HCE 621 or by permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

HCE 650 Basic Concepts in Couple and Family Counseling

This course will provide a historical context for the field of family therapy, as well as an exploration of the major theories that inform the current application of family therapy. Cr 3.

HCE 655 Human Sexuality for Counselors

This course provides information about human sexuality to heighten individual's awareness of his/her own sexuality and sexual issues, and to integrate this knowledge to improve the overall effectiveness of counseling skills. The course explores a wide spectrum of sexual behaviors and examines the relationships between sexuality, self-esteem, sex roles, and life styles. Emphasis is placed on developing an awareness of personal values associated with human sexuality. Prerequisite: HCE 621 or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

HCE 668 Human Development

This course examines the processes underlying growth and development across the life span from conception through childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and aging to death. The interaction of biological, cultural, and environmental factors will be considered in studying physical, cognitive, and psychosocial changes throughout the stages of life. This course includes a field experience. Cr 3.

HCE 670 Application of Family Systems Theories

This course is an advanced course focused on the application of family systems theories to several family case presentations.  We will be focused on Structural, Bowenian, Communication, Psychodynamic Experiential, Narrative, and Integrative Models.  Particular focus will be given to reflection on family-of-origin themes and the ways in which a deepened awareness of these themes can lead to more effective family counseling. Prerequisite: HCE 650 or permission of instructor. Cr. 3.

HCE 681 Clinical Supervision

This course introduces students to the practice of clinical supervision within the counseling profession. The course focuses on such topics as the history of supervision, supervision models, tasks and functions of supervision, relationships in supervision, supervisory responsibilities, administration, cultural differences, and ethical standards. An organizing principle of this course is to examine these topics from three perspectives: theoretical knowledge, skill development, and self-awareness. Prerequisite: master's degree in counseling, matriculated Psy.D. students, or by permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

HCE 686 Internship in Counselor Education

This course provides an opportunity for students to integrate formal coursework with on-the-job experience in selected institutions. Prerequisite: HCE 690. Cr 1-12.

HCE 687 Internship in Clinical Supervision

This course provides an opportunity to develop advanced skills in clinical supervision. Interns will be assigned to supervise master's level students in such courses as practicum and internship. Prerequisites: HCE 681 and HCE 694. Cr 3.

HCE 690 Individual Counseling Practicum Seminar

Through lecture, discussion, and group supervision students learn to apply professional knowledge and skills to the practice of counseling with individuals. Role playing, video and audio tapes, and demonstrations are used in helping students develop an integrated counseling style. This course is taken concurrently with HCE 691. Prerequisites: HCE 620, HCE 621, HCE 622 (school counseling specialty only), and HCE 626. Cr 3.

HCE 691 Individual Counseling Practicum Laboratory

This laboratory is an intensive experience in the direct application of counseling skills and techniques to individual clients within the context of counseling sessions. Audio and video tapes will be reviewed individually with a faculty supervisor. This course must be taken concurrently with HCE 690. Prerequisites: HCE 620, HCE 621, HCE 622 (school counseling specialty only), and HCE 626. Cr 3.

HCE 692 Advanced Individual Practicum

This is the advanced course in counseling practicum. In addition to building on the skills developed in HCE 690 (practicum), emphasis is placed on the structural analysis of typical client problems and the use of appropriate strategies of intervention. Other emphases include the staffing of actual cases and knowledge of community resources available to the counseling clientele. Prerequisite: HCE 690. Cr 3.

HCE 694 Practicum in Individual Supervision

This is an intensive supervised experience in applying specialized knowledge and skills to the practice of clinical supervision. Students will be assigned supervisees and through observation, audio/video tapes, and co-counseling, will both supervise and be supervised. Prerequisites: HCE 681 and matriculation in the CAS program. Cr 3.

HCE 695 Practicum in Play Therapy

This course is an intensive supervised experience, applying professional knowledge and skills in the practice of counseling children using play therapy techniques. Role-playing, video tapes, and demonstrations are used in helping each student develop an integrated counseling style. Prerequisites: HCE 621, HCE 622, HCE 623, HCE 624, and HCE 690. Cr 3.

HCE 697 Psychoeducational Group Work Practicum

This course focuses on the development of concepts, attitudes, and skills necessary to lead psychoeducational groups effectively in a variety of settings. Integration of group dynamics with psychoeducational group theory and group techniques is emphasized. Additionally, behaviors of leader and participants are analyzed to promote a deeper understanding of group roles and functions. Prerequisites: HCE 621 and HCE 626 or by permission of the instructor. Cr 3.

HCE 699 Independent Study in Counselor Education

This course provides students the opportunity to pursue a project independently, planning, and exploring a topic of interest within the field of counseling. Most independent study projects are library-based; all are intellectually sound, and reflect a high caliber of performance. Specific content and methods of evaluation will be determined in collaboration with the instructor. An approved proposal is a necessary prerequisite to registration. Prerequisite: Open to matriculated students only. Cr 1-6.

HRD (Human Resource Development)

HRD 500 College Mental Health

This course is focused on college mental health and the application of theory and practice to understand, intervene and enhance student mental health in a college environment.  We will focus on mental health through an ecological theoretical model which views sociohistorical conditions, campus community systems, and individual developmental, social and psychological factors as determinants to student growth and success.  Particular focus will be given to interrelated protective and risk factors across the various levels of systemic complexity. Individual and wider systemic influences and approaches will be explored. In addition, students will be given an opportunity to contribute to the mental health of the college community through engaging in campus mental health and other related initiatives.  This course will be open to: graduate students studying higher education or counselor education, and senior undergraduate students possibly pursuing a career in higher education or counseling. Cr 3.

HRD 510  Aging and the Search for Meaning

This course explores psychosocial and spiritual aspects of successful human aging. Multidisciplinary perspectives on aging will be examined including historical, psychological, sociological, cultural and religious. Learners will discuss key issues related to aging and the search for meaning through the lens of various genres (e.g., research, theory, fiction) as well as their own personal experiences. Cr 3.

HRD 540 Mindfulness in Adult Learning

This course examines the role of mindfulness practices and first-person inquiry in adult learning. Participants will examine the meaning of mindfulness from multiple perspectives, participate in mindfulness practices, and learn how to use mindfulness techniques in personal and professional lives. Participants will explore effective practices to create inclusive learning spaces. This course fulfills a skills-based middle core requirement in the Adult & Higher Education program. Cr 3.

HRD 550 Using Technology in Adult Learning

This course combines readings about using technology in adult learning with hands-on practice with current technologies that may be used in teaching, advising, and managing programs for adult learners. While emphasis will be primarily on the online environment, issues related to technology in blended and face-to-face environments will also be treated. Hands-on experiences with selected learning platforms will be emphasized. Broader implications for technology-based learning such as academic integrity, accessibility, and assessment will be explored. Cr 3.

HRD 551 Spirituality in Adult and Higher Education

This course examines the role of spirituality in adult and higher education. Historical and contemporary perspectives on ways in which spiritual issues influence the lives of educators and learners are explored. Questions this course investigates include: What is spirituality? How are core practices in adult and higher education such as learning, facilitating, advising, training, and managing affected by spiritual principles? In what ways has spirituality influenced social change in adult education? How does understanding and practicing spiritual virtues influence the personal and professional lives of educators and learners? Cr 3.

HRD 554 Foundations of Academic Advising

This course examines the foundations of academic advising in higher education.  Issues such as developmental advising, practice and delivery models, working with diverse populations, current research, ethics, and assessment practices are explored. Cr 3.

HRD 555 Introduction to Student Affairs in Higher Education

This course provides students with an introduction to student affairs in higher education institutions. Particular attention will be given to historical developments as rooted in the emergence of the unique model of higher education in the U.S. Students will review and critique theories, models  and orientations within student development, including the college student, and higher education institution culture and environment. In addition students will explore and analyze current issues in student development. The intent is to provide students with the foundation and skills necessary to understand and evaluate the field as well as to assess their own interest and commitment to careers in student affairs. Cr 3.

HRD 557 The Older Learner

This introductory course examines key issues such as demographic trends, theories of aging, problems and opportunities in later-life learning, productive retirement, and educational opportunities for elders. A major goal of the course is to invite professional educators to explore human aging with an eye toward improving teaching and/or program development with elder populations. Cr 3.

HRD 600 History and Philosophy of Adult Education

This course examines historical and philosophical foundations of adult education. Key trends and theoretical frameworks are explored. Students will be introduced to a range of adult education practice domains in Maine and elsewhere. Creating a "community of learners" and modeling other adult education practices is a central goal of this course. HRD 600 is a required core course in the Adult and Higher Education program. Cr 3.

HRD 601 Marketing Training and Adult Education

This course acquaints the student with the purpose, organization, function, methods, tools, and techniques of marketing within the setting of adult education, continuing education, and training programs. Attention is given to the development of a customized marketing plan, focusing on the research and planning phases of the plan. This is an applied course in which students spend a significant amount of time participating in hands-on learning experiences, working in teams. Cr 3.

HRD 615/PPM 615 Organizational Leadership

This foundational course considers contemporary perspectives, issues and strategies regarding the management of public sector organizations, the importance of public service and provides a basic understanding of public management theory and the application of theory to governmental and other public and nonprofit sector institutions. Topics covered include a wide range of public management concerns, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, persuasive communication, team building, decision making, organizational culture and change. The course prepares students to become managers and leaders of public and not-for-profit institutions who can enhance the capability of these institutions. The course presents a realistic view of effective management and leadership in government and nonprofit organizations and the ways in which these organizations work and interact and focuses on the creation of social and public value, keeping in mind that economic and private value creation is often a part of public and non-profit management. Cr 3.

HRD 630 Facilitating Adult Learning

This course examines theory and practice of facilitating adult learning. Learners will examine effective facilitation skills for adult learners, develop and facilitate a content-focused lesson and a group discussion, provide constructive feedback to peers, and self-evaluate skills and goals as a facilitator. HRD 630 fulfills a skills-based middle core requirement in the Adult & Higher Education program. Cr 3.

HRD 631 The Adult Learner

This course examines the social, psychological, economic, and cultural situation of the variety of adults served by adult education programs today. The aim of the course is to develop a theory of learning which is applicable to adults in diverse circumstances and with diverse goals, needs, and styles of learning. Attention is given to stages of adult growth, the development of learning goals, learning environments, and to a variety of theories on learning. Cr 3.

HRD 633 Leadership in Adult and Higher Education

This course examines leadership skills necessary for the development and management of adult education centers, continuing education offices, professional development departments, and higher education programs to support adult learning.  Particular attention is given to organizational culture, leadership styles and perspectives, development of vision and mission statements, personnel issues, team development, communication, conflict resolution, and identifying one’s leadership philosophy.  HRD 633 fulfills a skills-based middle core requirement in the Adult & Higher Education program. Cr 3.

HRD 636 Planning Programs for Adult Learners

This course presents the purpose, structure, functions, methods and techniques of planning programs for adult learners. The course emphasizes practice, skill acquisition, and competence in curriculum design and program development for adults with diverse needs and in diverse learning environments. The course covers both educational and training programs within organizations with attention given to the strategic role of program design and development in helping organizations achieve their mission and organizational objectives. This is an applied course in which students plan a specific program for adult learners. Cr. 3.

HRD 639 The Heart of Teaching

This course explores the elements of fostering and supporting fundamental changes in adult learners through the process of teaching. Transformational learning theory is examined and applications to teaching are explored through exercises and discussion. Cr 3.

HRD 646 Global Perspectives of Adult Education and Practices

This course provides students with a broad overview of some of the historical roots and current practices of adult education internationally. It provides information about significant leaders and agencies, as well as subjects such as: women's education, literacy, peace and human rights, research, the environment, and new technology, as they relate to adult education. Cr 3.

HRD 649 Capstone Seminar in Adult and Higher Education This seminar is taken at the end of the M.S. in Adult and Higher Education program and addresses questions and issues of importance to the members of the course. Students review their program portfolio and select a key topic on which they have worked in the past in order to further develop this topic, facilitate a seminar module for their classmates, and write a publishable paper. At the end of the seminar students will review and evaluate their overall experience in the master’s program. Prerequisite: Open to matriculated students. Cr 3.

HRD 667 Action Research and Evaluation Methodologies

This course provides an overview of the role of action research within organizations and community settings. Techniques in survey development and evaluation strategies are emphasized. A number of methodologies is presented, such as: the normal group, the Delphi technique, assessment centers, performance appraisal, interviews and observation. Cr 3.

HRD 685 CAS in Adult Learning Completion Project

Students will undertake a major project of their own design as a final requirement for completion of the certificate of advanced study in adult learning. There are four options for projects: (1) field-based study (2) public policy initiative (3) publishable theory paper and (4) design of a curriculum for adult learners. Students in HRD 685 will participate in a support seminar with master’s students who are doing internships and/or independent projects.  Prerequisite: open to graduate students accepted into the CAS in Adult Learning who have completed 24 credit hours. Cr 3.

HRD 687 Internship in Adult Education and Human Resource Development

Designed to provide professional experience in the student's selected area of concern. A plan for the internship is presented for approval to the student's advisor. On approval, the intern completes his/her planned program under the supervision and evaluation of a responsible person for the internship assignment. Prerequisite: Open to matriculated graduate students and with permission of the instructor. Cr 1-9.

HRD 698 Directed Study in Adult Education and Human Resource Development

This course provides students the opportunity to pursue a project independently, planning, and exploring an area of interest within the field of human resource development. The project must be field-based, intellectually sound, and reflect a high caliber of performance. Specific content and methods of evaluation are determined in conjunction with the faculty supervisor. An approved proposal is a necessary prerequisite to registration. Prerequisite: Open to matriculated graduate students and with permission of instructor. Cr 1-6.

HRD 699 Independent Study in Human Resource Development

This course provides students the opportunity to pursue a project independently, planning, and exploring a topic of interest within the field of human resource development. The project must be library-based, intellectually sound, and reflect a high caliber of performance. Specific content and methods of evaluation will be determined in collaboration with the instructor. An approved proposal is a necessary prerequisite to registration. Cr 1-6.

PDS (Professional Development)

PDS 513 Integrating Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction & Social & Emotional Intelligence into the Classroom

This course provides training in Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for teachers, counselors, and psychologists in school settings. Students learn Mindfulness techniques for themselves and for their students as well as for their relationships with colleagues. Through Mindfulness exercises and practice, group and dyad discussions, presentations, readings, and talks by the instructor, students will develop Mindfulness skills to integrate into the school setting for themselves as teachers and for students. The emphasis is on integrating Mindfulness into the classroom through modeling and seamlessly bringing Mindfulness to help students develop emotional and social skills. These skills help children thrive and as well give them a solid foundation for their academic studies. Cr 3.

PDS 514 Integrating Mindfulness-based Compassionate Communication into Education

Mindfulness serves as the foundation for learning Mindfulness-based Compassionate Communication. Having a foundation in mindfulness knowledge, study, practice, and skills, the student will have the essential beginnings to study and practice this language which has as its core empathy for oneself and others and one's experience rather than from evaluation, blame, advice, judgments. This language is conducive to use in all aspects of education as it gives language to respect, non-judgment, compassion for self and others whether students, colleagues, school staff, and parents. This is a language of connection built upon equality rather than a language of power-over, with the intention of meeting the needs of all people, including the needs of those in conflict, going from disconnection to connection between self, other, and groups. Prerequisites: Previous 3-credit or week-long Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction course or Instructor permission is required. Cr 3.

PDS 525 Introduction to Green Care

This course will provide an introduction to Green Care interventions within a wide range of counseling, educational, and healthcare contexts, with an emphasis on social and therapeutic horticulture/horticultural therapy, nature and wilderness therapy, ecotherapy, animal assisted therapy and care farming. The focus of the course will be on Nature Based Therapy and Treatment Interventions. Cr 3.

PDS 526 Exploration, Principles, and Ethics of Animal Assisted Interventions and Anthrozoology

This course will provide an overview of Animal Assisted Interventions (AAI). Topics include history, theories, research, terminology, safety and ethics, and the practice and differentiation between several forms of AAI. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of the human-animal bond as part of AAI for clients and practitioners. This course also focuses on the role of animals in human lives. This course provides the necessary foundation for understanding animal assisted activities and therapies in improving the lives of humans. Students will gain an understanding of the various roles animals play in counseling and education, and the clear legal and ethical boundaries and differentiation between educational and mental health practitioners of AAI. Cr 3.

PDS 527 Equine Assisted Interventions

This course will provide an introduction to the spectrum of Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) modalities, but will focus upon the mental health therapy and educational aspects of EAAT, clearly differentiating between therapy and therapeutic aspects, as well as roles and limitations for practitioners with different backgrounds and licensure. Topics include history, theories, research, terminology, safety and ethics, and the practice and differentiation between several forms of AAAT. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of the human-equine bond as pa1t of EAAT for clients and practitioners. The course will emphasize the role of the horse as co-facilitator and partner, working with the counselor or educator to facilitate treatment or educational goals. Students will have the opportunity to be supported to thoroughly investigate their specific areas of interest within the field of EAAT. Prerequisites: PDS 525 and PDS 526 or Instructor Permission. Cr 3.

PDS 528 Canine Assisted Interventions

This course will provide an introduction to Canine Assisted Activities and Therapies (CAAT), and will focus upon the mental health therapy and educational aspects, clearly differentiating between therapy and therapeutic aspects, as well as roles and limitations for practitioners with different backgrounds and licensure. Topics include history, theories, research, terminology, safety and ethics, and the practice and differentiation between several forms of CAAT. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of the human-canine bond as part of CAAT for clients and practitioners. The course will emphasize the role of the canine as co-facilitator and partner, working with the counselor or educator to facilitate treatment or educational goals. Students will have the opportunity to be supported to thoroughly investigate their specific areas of interest within CAAT. Prerequisites: PDS 525 and PDS 526 or Instructor Permission. Cr 3.

PDS 529 Care Farming

This course will provide an overview of Care Farming, but will focus upon the mental health therapy and educational aspects of Care Farming, clearly differentiating between therapy and therapeutic aspects, as well as roles and limitations for practitioners with different backgrounds and licensure. The course will emphasize the counselor or educator working in a nature based/farm setting to facilitate treatment or educational goals. Topics include history, theories, research, terminology, safety and ethics, and the practice and differentiation between several forms of Care farming. Students will have the opportunity to be supported to thoroughly investigate their specific areas of interest within the field of Care Farming. Prerequisites: PDS 525 and PDS 526 or Instructor Permission. Cr 3.

PDS 535 Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age

Teachers will explore the use of online tools that support student learning, collaboration, and communication that extends beyond classroom walls. They will also become knowledgeable about curricular best practices and skills as they fit into the K-12 classroom. Emphasis is given to cloud computing and collaborative technologies for a digital age school. GSuite for Education as well as digital based learning theories will be explored. Educators will be exposed to many of the GSuite Applications as well as create a final project and presentation of how they will use the tools in the classroom setting. The topics explored each semester/year are dependent on current trends in digital learning and also change based on the interests of the participants. For that reason, this course may be repeated for credit up to three times (for a maximum of nine total credits earned). Cr 3, may be repeated twice for up to 9 credits.

PDS 551 Fostering Resiliency, Competency, and Safety: Effective Strategies for Teaching Struggling Students

This year long course will provide practicing teachers and school faculty the knowledge and skills that will assist in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of practical and effective strategies to address students’ social and emotional health and skill deficits, while fostering resiliency, competency, engagement and safety for all students in the classroom. Throughout the course, participants will be practicing social, communication, and classroom management skills that reflect best practice, build connection with all students/families and create an atmosphere of safety in order to address students’ barriers to academic, social and emotional growth. The complex needs of students presenting with chronic distress will be explored, as well as methods to bring relationship to the center of teaching without compromising academic integrity. Peer and instructor feedback sessions offer the opportunity to offer critical and supportive feedback while implementing identified changes to instructional and classroom management practices. Cr 3.

PDS 555 MACM Special Education Mentorship

This course is a semester-long online supervised school- or agency-based mentorship for conditionally certified teachers participating in the Maine Alternative Certification and Mentoring program (MACM). The teacher works under the direct supervision of a state appointed mentor following the guidelines approved by the state for 282 initial teacher certification. Topics and activities for the course are determined by the MACM program.  Prerequisites: Program permission . Cr 3.

PDS 623 Dyslexia Remediation

This course prepares educators to use the Orton-Gillingham reading instruction method with students identified with dyslexia and related reading challenges. This is a year-long course that begins and ends at the start of each summer.  Participants attend focused seminars during the summer to learn the history and science of reading disorders, effective instructional practices, and Orton-Gillingham instructional procedures. During the following school year, participants complete a required 100-hour practicum during which they apply their learning by providing twice-weekly afterschool tutoring for students with dyslexia at the Portland (Maine) Children’s Dyslexia Center.  Upon successful completion of the course, participants earn the Children’s Dyslexia Centers’ Dyslexia Practitioner 1 Certification. Cr 6.

SED (Special Education)

SED 518 Targeted and Individualized Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities

The primary purpose of this course is to learn and analyze principles and skills of teaching and learning which are effective with students who need more intensive and individualized teaching. The students would either currently have IEP's or are currently being served on Tier Two or Three of the continuum of multi-tiered systems of student support. Students who are English language learners with suspected disabilities are included. The course will address applying and analyzing evidence-based instructional and assessment strategies for progress toward learning goals. Prerequisite: SED 335, SED 540, or by program permission, Cr 3.

SED 520 Multi-Tiered Systems of Classroom Support

This course introduces participants to the concepts of multi-tiered systems of academic and behavior support, from the schoolwide to the classroom perspective, including students with suspected or identified disabilities. Participants will learn about the characteristics of MTSS at Tiers 1 and 2: prevention-based, focus on student performance, data-based decision making and problem solving, continuous progress monitoring, and using a continuum of evidence­ based interventions.  Students are expected to establish a productive learning environment that includes classroom expectations, structuring the classroom, systems to positively acknowledge behavior, and to address minor problem behavior. Prerequisite: SED 335 or SED 540, concurrently with EDU 445, or EDU 543, or EDU 550; or program permission. Cr 3.

SED 540 Learners Who Are Exceptional in General Education

The primary goal of this survey course is to construct an understanding and knowledge of the range of exceptionalities, including students with disabilities and those identified as gifted and talented. The course is based on the following premises: a) students with disabilities are guaranteed an appropriate education that includes engagement with typically developing peers and is based on the general education curriculum to the greatest extent possible; and b) students who are gifted and talented should be educated appropriately based on their academic and artistic abilities. Topics include characteristics of areas of exceptionality; planning and strategies for differentiating instruction and universal design; assistive technology; state and federal laws regarding students who are exceptional; working with families; Response to Intervention (RtI); and collaboration between all school personnel. Cr 3.

SED 550 Teaching Students who are Gifted in the Regular Classroom

This course is designed for classroom teachers whose responsibilities include serving gifted students within the regular classroom.  The course is also for teachers of the gifted who serve students in a pull out program because that is considered their regular classroom.  This course is also designed for consulting teachers of the gifted and talented who are responsible for helping classroom teachers differentiate instruction for gifted students in the regular classroom.  Participants will examine popular and personal attitudes toward and beliefs about gifted students.  They will identify gifted students through relevant and observable classroom behaviors.  Participants will adapt required curriculum to meet the special needs of gifted students and work collaboratively with other teachers.  Participants will also consider current issues in gifted child education that have implications specific to the regular classroom environment. Cr 3.

SED 586/EDU 586 Integrated Internship

The mentored internship is an extensive field experience for candidates in the double certification general education and special education pathway. Candidates demonstrate commitment and skill in educating students with diverse abilities and backgrounds. The 900 hour total internship is evaluated according to the Maine Teaching Standards and fulfills the student teaching requirement for general education and 282 Teacher of Students with Disabilities certification. Prerequisite:  matriculation in the integrated certification pathway of the Master of Science in Special Education and program permission. Cr 9 (1-3 credits per semester up to total of nine credits).

SED 604 Behavioral Principles to Analyze Learning, Teaching, and Assessment

This introductory course introduces principles of teaching and learning demonstrated to be effective in improving student success in academics, behavior, and social skills. Included in the course are preparing learning objectives, designing direct and explicit instruction to address the objectives, defining assessment data gathering and analyzing procedures, and determining student progress and instructional adjustments. The course provides fundamental knowledge and skills used in several courses throughout the program focused on the multi-tier system of student support for academics and behavior, including Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports and Progress Monitoring in reading and mathematics. Cr 3.

SED 615 Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

This course examines the foundations (data, systems and practices) and essential features of Positive Behavioral Support at all three tiers: classwide, targeted and individual. Students will gain an understanding of basic principles and measurement of behavior and conduct applied projects that include creating, implementing, and evaluating data-driven intervention plans. Cr 3.

SED 625 Multi-Tier Mathematics Instruction and Assessment

This course includes lectures, discussions, guided practice and applied learning experiences in the scope and sequence of progressively more intensive mathematics instruction and assessment for students with mathematics difficulties in kindergarten through grade 12, including students with diverse abilities and backgrounds.  Starting with the five foundations of math instruction (e.g., conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, productive disposition), the course describes the features of universal (e.g., Tier 1) core math instruction then provides guided practice and applied learning experiences to prepare teachers to use progressively more intensive math instruction based on student learning needs. Participants will learn how to select and use scientifically validated mathematics instruction and assessment practices for students needing supplemental (e.g., Tier 2) and intensive (e.g., Tier 3), and special education mathematics instruction and assessment.  Special attention will be paid to the research supporting this instruction and assessment. Cr 3.

SED 627 Multi-Tier Reading Instruction and Assessment

This course includes lectures, discussions, guided practice and applied learning experiences in the scope and sequence of progressively more intensive reading instruction and assessment for students with reading difficulties in kindergarten through grade 12, including students with diverse abilities and backgrounds. Starting with the five foundations of reading instruction (e.g., phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension), the course describes the features of universal (e.g., Tier 1) core reading instruction then provides guided practice and applied learning experiences to prepare teachers to use progressively more intensive reading instruction and assessment based on student learning needs. Participants will learn how to select and use scientifically validated reading instruction and assessment practices for students needing supplemental (e.g., Tier 2), intensive (e.g., Tier 3), and special education reading instruction and assessment.  Special attention will be paid to the research supporting this instruction and assessment. Cr 3.

SED 653 Assessment of Academic Achievement

This course is designed to prepare special educators and other professionals who work in schools to select, administer, score, and interpret measures of academic achievement. Numerous measures of academic achievement, including published norm-referenced tests, criterion-referenced tests, curriculum-based assessment and measurement, and performance-based assessments will be studied. Students will develop an understanding of how to use measures of academic achievement as part of a comprehensive problem-solving process that fits with responsive interventions in schools. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated special education, and ETEP students, or program permission.

SED 659 Education of Students who are Gifted and Talented

This course is for individuals responsible for initiating, mainstreaming, and/or extending services for gifted/talented students. Topics for study include: a) identification procedures, b) curriculum development and implementation, c) administration and classroom management, d) staff development and community involvement, and e) evaluation of student growth and program effectiveness. Cr 3.

SED 660 Curriculum and Methods for Teaching Students who are Gifted

This course is for individuals responsible for a) developing or modifying learning experiences for gifted/talented students at the elementary or secondary school level, b) implementing differentiated learning experiences within the regular classroom or through a special grouping arrangement, and/or c) creating/selecting instructional materials to support the implementation of differentiated learning experiences. Cr 3.

SED 662 Creative Intelligence and the Learners who are Gifted

This course is for individuals responsible for a) identifying creative potential within students, b) planning and implementing learning experiences for nurturing creative thinking, c) selecting or developing instructional materials for enhancing creativity, d) establishing learning environments conducive to creativity, and/or e) evaluating program effectiveness and student growth in creativity. Cr 3.

SED 666 Models of Education for Students who are Gifted and Talented

This course is for individuals responsible for choosing, adapting, or designing a model to serve gifted and talented students.  Selected models both conceptual and organizational prominent in the field are reviewed and critiqued.  Individuals consider the implications of each model and its applicability to gifted programming and current educational initiatives. Cr 3.

SED 667 Social/Emotional Needs of Students who are Gifted/Talented

This course is for classroom teachers, program coordinators, and teachers of the gifted and talented, parents, and other individuals who interact with gifted and talented students.  Participants will investigate factors affecting social and emotional development, causes and effects of achievement and underachievement and curriculum particular to the affective domain.  The course includes resources and strategies for responding to the needs of gifted and talented students. Cr 3.

SED 669 Critical and Creative Thinking in the Classroom

This course is designed for individuals who are concerned with providing critical and creative thinking lessons for all ability learners in the classroom.  This course will look at ways to adapt instruction in order to create flexible, interactive, and authentic, higher level activities.  Emphasis will include:  identifying elements of critical and creative thinking; utilizing instructional strategies/techniques such as graphic organizers; providing for a variety of grouping arrangements and; developing assessment tools. Cr 3.

SED 682 Special Education Regulations, Procedures, and IEP Team

This course is for educators working directly with students with suspected and identified disabilities. The course focuses on the role of special education in both a multi-tiered system of student support (MTSS) and the process for developing and implementing Individualized Education Programs (IEP). Participants examine current federal and state statutes and accompanying regulations governing special education services. Emphasis is placed on the functioning of the IEP team, including collaborating with families, from a teacher's or service provider's perspective. Prerequisite: SED 335 or SED 540, or program permission. Cr 3.

SED 684 Introduction to Special Education Administration

This course is designed to offer experience in administering special education programs. The course emphasizes the organization and administration of special education programs. A goal of the course is to give participants clear understandings of the decisions faced by regular and special educational leaders and of the skills and knowledge base necessary to perform effectively as leaders. Prerequisite: SED 540 or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

SED 687 Technology for Learning and Communicating

This course introduces students to the use of technology, including assistive technology, with all students, including those individuals with special learning and communication needs. A range of technologies will be examined from "low tech" devices such as simple switches to computers, adaptive devices, and software appropriate for individuals with disabilities. A variety of equipment, materials, software, and hardware will be available for student use. Cr 3.

SED 688 Internship in Special Education for Students with Mild to Moderate Disabilities

Interns complete a 15 week semester long or part-time equivalent mentored internship in special education services for students with mild or moderate disabilities in accordance with the Maine Teacher Certification Standards.  Prerequisites: Open to matriculated candidates in the Teaching Students with Mild to Severe Disabilities program or by permission of the Teacher Education Department. Cr 3.

SED 693 Transitions Among Agency, School, and Community

This course introduces participants to the concepts of transition in four phases of special education services: (a) birth to five child development services to school programs, (b) special purpose schools and related services to school programs, (c) between schools in a school district, and (d) from school programs to post-secondary education and community life. Students develop knowledge of services and resources provided by agencies and special purpose schools birth to adult and skills in multi-disciplinary team planning. Prerequisite: one special education course or permission of instructor. Cr 3.

SED 699 Special Education Research Capstone

This course is an opportunity to gain, apply, and integrate knowledge and skill in exceptionality by planning and conducting a project. The project must be intellectually sound, have direct applicability to the student, and produce a high-quality product. Specific content and methods of evaluation are determined in conjunction with instructor. Prerequisites: EDU 600, matriculated students only, and program permission. Cr 3.

SPY (Educational and School Psychology)

SPY 601 Behavioral Principles of Learning

This course provides a comprehensive review of the psychological principles of learning derived from experimental research and validated by applied studies. Topics include respondent behavior and conditioning, operant behavior and conditioning, stimulus control, motivating operations, schedule influences on behavior, and verbal and rule-governed behavior. The course is designed to provide students with a foundational understanding of the concepts and principles of behavior analysis and thereby provide a solid grounding for assessment and intervention courses with a behavior analytic orientation. Cr 3.

SPY 602 Single Case Research Methods

This course is designed to introduce students to research designs used in a comprehensive, systematic process of decision making and problem solving. This course will emphasize methods for evaluating the effectiveness of academic and behavioral interventions for school-aged children. A history of experimental design, types of experimental reasoning, and experimental validity lay the groundwork for understanding how single-case research designs are used to assess the efficacy of applied interventions. Students will learn how to identify and record behaviors, analyze and display data, match research designs to the research question, and flexibly employ research designs in applied settings. Finally, students will be exposed to technology and information resources applicable to conducting single-case research. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of SPY 601 or program permission.Cr 3.

SPY 604 Functional Behavioral Assessment

This course examines a variety of behavioral assessment methods for (a) identifying the variables that contribute to behavioral problems and (b) guiding the design of effective behavioral interventions. Functional behavioral assessment techniques covered in this course include interviews, observations, descriptive assessments, and functional analyses. Applied learning experiences integrated throughout the course provide students with opportunities to practice designing, conducting, and interpreting functional behavioral assessments. Prerequisites: SPY 601 and SPY 602, or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 605 Principles and Procedures for Instructional Intervention

The primary focus of this course is to provide graduate students with exposure to evidence-based systematic instruction methods that are used within school/agency settings. This course will review functional assessment procedures used to identify appropriate educational programs for students/clients. This course will emphasize instruction and practice in implementing empirically supported interventions for promoting academic, social, communication, and life skills. Procedures such as shaping, chaining, discrete trial teaching, task analysis, incidental teaching, functional communication, and direct social skills instruction will be considered. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPY 601 or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 606 Principles and Procedures for Behavior Intervention

This course examines the philosophical underpinnings of behavior analysis and behavior analytic procedures for promoting socially meaningful behavior change in applied settings. Emphasis will be placed on the application of behavior analytic principles and procedures to (a) decrease behaviors that interfere with functioning and (b) strengthen adaptive replacement behaviors. The dynamic interactions between academic, social-emotional, behavioral, and diversity influences on human functioning will be considered. The course includes a blend of assigned readings, lectures, discussions, clinical case examples, and applied learning experiences to develop student competencies. Prerequisites: SPY 601 and SPY 605, or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 607 Consultation and Collaborative Problem-Solving

This course examines how school psychologists and behavior analysts utilize collaboration and consultation skills to promote effective implementation of interventions that address the academic, social-emotional and behavioral needs of school-aged children and their families. This course will review varied models of consultation (e.g., behavioral, mental health, and problem-solving) and analyze the skills needed to collaborate effectively with diverse individuals (e.g., parents/caregivers, educators, and community professionals). The role of consultation will be explored within a data-based, collaborative problem-solving approach to the delivery of a continuum of services that include assessment (e.g., functional behavioral assessment), intervention (e.g., behavior intervention plans), staff supports (e.g., behavioral skills training), and the application of single case research designs to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. This course includes a blend of lecture, discussion, role play and applied learning experiences. Prerequisites: SPY 601, SPY 602, SPY 604, SPY 605, SPY 606, and SPY 608, or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 608 Professional Ethics in Behavior Analysis

This course provides in-depth preparation for ethical practices in behavior analysis. Drawing from the ethical standards of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB), the course includes readings and application of ethical standards for clinical and school settings. This course includes lecture, practica experiences, small group discussion, and large group discussion learning experiences. The course is designed to meet the ethics training standards established by the BACB. Cr 3.

SPY 609 Professional Ethics in Psychology

This course provides in-depth preparation for ethical practices in school psychology. Drawing from national and international ethical standards from the American Psychological Association (APA), Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB), and the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), the course includes readings and application of ethical standards for school settings. The course is designed to meet the ethics training standards set by APA, ASPPB, NASP, and the Maine Board of Examiners of Psychologists. Special consideration is given to school psychologists ethical obligations to promote family-school collaboration. Prerequisites: Matriculation into the School Psychology program, or with program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 610 Systems-Level Services to Promote Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Health

This course provides knowledge of principles and research related to multitiered prevention systems, resilience and risk factors associated with social-behavioral problems, and evidence-based strategies for crisis intervention. Emphasis will be placed on developing skills necessary to achieve collaboration between school and family systems to enhance the social-behavioral outcomes of students. Prerequisites: Matriculation in school psychology program or program permission.  Cr 3.

SPY 620 Multitiered Systems of Academic Support for General and Special Education

This course provides training in knowledge and skills for the implementation of multitiered systems of support (MTSS) in school settings, including students with suspected or identified disabilities. Students will gain knowledge about school system structures and organization, including general and special education. Through a problem-solving framework, students will learn how to apply universal screening and individual assessment methods to inform interventions which improve academic engagement and learning for all students including those with diverse backgrounds. Based on knowledge of cognition, learning, and developmental processes, students will learn to select, implement, and use data to evaluate evidence-based system level, group, and individual academic interventions. Emphasis will be placed on developing collaboration skills with other school personnel to help all students become self-regulated learners and increase time engaged in learning through a multitiered continuum of services. Students will gain knowledge in the use of information and assistive technology resources to enhance learning, intervention acceptability, and treatment fidelity. Prerequisites: None.  Cr 3.

SPY 640 Supervision and Performance Management in Applied Behavior Analysis

This seminar provides training in behavior-analytic approaches to personnel supervision and management. Primary course topics include (a) ethical, competency-based models of supervision, (b) evidence-based staff training procedures, including behavioral skills training; and (c) performance management practices. Students will gain an understanding of the purpose of supervision, learn strategies to deliver effective supervision to trainees and personnel responsible for delivering behavior-analytic services, and gain skills in applying behavior-analytic assessment and intervention procedures to improve personnel performance. Students also will conduct a self-assessment of professional competencies in applied behavior analysis in order to design individualized professional development plans. Class sessions will include a blend of lecture, discussion, role plays, and case-based application activities. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPY 601, SPY 602, and SPY 604 and matriculation in the Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis or MS in Educational Psychology (Concentration in Applied Behavior Analysis) program; or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 670 Cognitive Affective Bases of Behavior

This course provides an in-depth study of cognition and affect, including perception, attention, learning and thinking, memory, executive functioning, self-control, motivation, and language. The course provides students with knowledge about (1) biological, cultural, and social influences on cognitive skills, (2) human learning, cognitive, affective, and developmental processes, and (3) biological, cultural, social, and developmental influences on behavior, mental health, and learning. Prerequisites: Matriculation in the School Psychology program, or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 671 Physical Bases of Behavior

This course examines the biological bases of behavior. Biological, anatomical, physiological, neurological, biochemical, and endrocrinological factors that influence behavior are explored. The course also considers the structure and function of the nervous system in relation to both typical and atypical patterns of child development and functioning. Accordingly, biological influences on learning, memory, attention, motivation, emotion, and other domains of educational performance will be discussed. Prerequisites: None. Cr 3.

SPY 672 Assessments and Interventions to Develop Academic Skills

This course is designed to prepare students to engage in a comprehensive systematic process of effective decision making and problem solving while conducting academic assessments and designing academic interventions for children of all backgrounds. Students will learn to select, administer, score, and interpret measures of academic achievement including published norm-referenced tests, criterion-referenced tests, curriculum-based assessments, and performance-based assessments as part of data collection process relevant to assessment. Students will develop an understanding of how to use measures of academic achievement as part of a comprehensive problem solving process that provides data to determine the effectiveness of instructional interventions. During the assessment and intervention processes, students will learn how to apply their knowledge of human learning, cognition, development, and technology as well as knowledge of biological and social factors to enhance children’s cognitive and academic skills. Prerequisites: Successful completion of EDU 600 and HCE 605 and matriculation in the School Psychology program, or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 673 Social Foundations of Behavior

This course examines the social foundations of behavior. Students will gain an understanding of the science of social psychology by reading and critically evaluating both classic and current research in the field. Topics such as conformity, mass communication and persuasion, social cognition, self-justification, human aggression, stereotypes and prejudice, group dynamics, and inter-group relations will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the implications of social psychology research for promoting prosocial behavior in school environments. Cr 3.

SPY 674 Psychopathology

This course explores current conceptualizations of psychopathology by examining clinical, empirical, and theoretical information related to psychological disorders across the lifespan. The course reviews diagnostic classification systems; the symptomology, etiology, and treatment of common disorders; and major issues in the field of psychopathology. Emphasis will be placed on (a) the biological, developmental, social, and cultural influences on behavior and mental health and (b) the extent to which psychological disorders impact social, emotional, behavioral, and academic/occupational functioning. Prerequisites: Matriculation in Educational or School Psychology programs, or program permission.  Cr 3.

SPY 675 Indirect Behavioral Assessment

This course examines a variety of analog behavior assessment methods addressing social emotional behavior issues. Assessment techniques covered in the course include psycho-social interviews, behavior rating scales, social skills assessments, and adaptive behavior assessments. This course includes practical experiences in which students are supervised in the administration, scoring, and interpretation of assessment procedures. Prerequisites: Matriculation in the School Psychology program and satisfactory completion of EDU 600 and HCE 605, or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 677 Cognitive Assessment

This course is designed to prepare students to conduct cognitive assessments which inform academic interventions. Students will learn to select, administer, score, and interpret measures of intellectual functioning. Students will develop an understanding of how to use measures of intellectual functioning as part of a comprehensive problem-solving process that drives effective accommodations and interventions. Prerequisites: EDU 600, HCE 605, and matriculation in the School Psychology program. Cr 3.

SPY 679 Diversity in the Science and Practice of Psychology

This course provides conceptual foundations and skills needed by psychologists to work with diverse client populations. Students will identify individual differences and diverse characteristics that impact student learning. Readings and discussion will emphasize understanding the influence of diversity factors in order to promote effective and equitable assessment and intervention practices. The identification and development of skills to collaborate with school staff, interpreters, cultural brokers, and community liaisons will explored through case studies and role-play. Students will participate in activities to help recognize in themselves and others subtle racial, class, gender, and cultural biases that may influence decision-making, instruction, behavior, and outcomes for students. Ethical and legal considerations for working with students of diverse backgrounds will also be highlighted. Prerequisites: Matriculation in school psychology program or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 688 Specialist-Level Internship in School Psychology

The specialist-level internship is the culminating training experience within the MS in Educational Psychology (School Psychology Concentration) program. The internship requires completion of 1500 hours of practice in a school setting under the supervision of a credentialed school psychologist. Students may complete the internship on a full-time basis for one academic year or on a part-time basis for two academic years. The internship provides broad training in assessment, intervention, consultation, and applied research to prepare students for entry-level professional practice.  Prerequisites: Matriculation in the MS in Educational Psychology (School Psychology Concentration) program; successful completion of all required courses and practica within the degree program; and program permission. Cr 9 total (1-3 per semester).

SPY 693 School Psychology Practicum I

The 300 clock hour Practicum I is an introductory supervised experience in school psychology. Practicum I provides students with introductory experiences in school psychology and an opportunity to gain familiarity with the culture, systems, and educational practices within schools. Students in the School Psychology Program must complete 3 credits of SPY 693 during the first 2 years in the program, and they typically complete 1 credit per semester. Students complete practicum experiences on an individualized basis under the joint supervision of an appropriately certified/licensed school psychologist in the placement setting and a member of the core School Psychology Program faculty. Supervisors work individually with students to plan and complete a sequence of activities representing the core domains of school psychology practice. Prerequisites: Matriculation in the School Psychology program and program permission. Cr 1-3.

SPY 694 School Psychology Practicum II

The 300 clock hour Practicum II is an advanced experience within a school or related clinical setting. Practicum II provides students with supervised experiences in psychological assessment, intervention, consultation and other aspects of school psychology practice. Students in the School Psychology Program must complete 3 credits of SPY 694 during the last 2 years of coursework, and they typically complete one credit per semester. Students complete practicum experiences on an individualized basis under the joint supervision of an appropriately licensed/credentialed school psychologist in the placement setting and a member of the core School Psychology Program faculty. Supervisors work individually with students to plan and complete a sequence of activities representing a broad range of psychological services and all domains of school psychology practice. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of 3 credits of SPY 693 and program permission. Cr 1-3.

SPY 697 Statistics

This course is designed to introduce students to quantitative research designs used in a comprehensive, systematic process of decision making and problem solving. This course will emphasize the application of inferential statistics for program evaluation and applied research projects in education and psychology. Students will learn and apply basic parametric and non-parametric statistical procedures, including t-tests, Chi Square, Regression, and ANOVA. Students will learn how to analyze and display data, match research designs to the research question, and flexibly employ research designs in applied settings. Finally, students will be exposed to technology and information resources applicable to conducting statistical research. Cross-listed with EDU 705. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of EDU 600 or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 699 Independent Study in School Psychology

This course provides students with opportunity to pursue a project independently, planning and exploring a topic of interest within the field of school psychology. The project must be research-based, intellectually sound, and reflect a high caliber of performance. Specific content and methods of evaluation will be determined in collaboration with the instructor. An approved proposal is a necessary prerequisite to registration. Prerequisites: Matriculation in Psy.D. in School Psychology. Cr var.

SPY 709 History, Systems, and the Profession of Psychology

This course covers the history of modern psychology and describes the development and role of school psychology as a specialty area. The history of multiple service delivery models and methods of school psychology will be explored through readings and research. Additionally, students will develop knowledge related to professional dispositions and effective practice as a school psychologist. To enhance professional practice, students will learn about relevant technology and identify professional development opportunities. Prerequisites: Matriculation in PsyD in School Psychology Program or program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 727 Seminar in Academic Assessment and Intervention

This course provides in-depth training in knowledge and skills for academic assessment and intervention practices. Through a problem-solving framework, students will learn advanced practices in screening and individual assessment methods to inform interventions aimed at improving academic engagement and learning for all students including those of diverse backgrounds. Students will increase their ability to use ethical practices to evaluate the suitability, acceptability, and usability of academic interventions by reviewing relevant research and other data sources. Based on knowledge of cognition, learning, and developmental processes, students will broaden their ability select, implement, and use data to evaluate evidence-based academic interventions. Emphasis will be placed on developing collaborative skills to be able to work with other school personnel in the assessment and intervention process. Students will gain advanced knowledge in the use of information and assistive technology resources to enhance learning, intervention acceptability, and treatment fidelity. Prerequisites: Matriculation in PsyD in School Psychology program and completion of SPY 620 and SPY 672, or program permission.  Cr 3.

SPY 729 Seminar in Behavioral Assessment and Intervention for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

This doctoral seminar provides training in knowledge and skills pertaining to best practices in conducting functional behavioral assessment and using the results of assessments to design individually tailored function-based interventions. This course will emphasize the application of behavior analytic problem solving approach to address a wide range of referral concerns (e.g., self-injurious, aggressive, stereotypic, destructive oppositional, and other forms of interfering behaviors) with a focus on developing strategies that minimize interfering behaviors and maximize prosocial replacement behaviors. This course will also include practice in report writing and in developing procedures for documenting the effectiveness of interventions. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated PsyD students or with program permission only, SPY 601, 602, 604, 606, and 607. Cr 3.

SPY 730 Seminar in Behavioral Assessment and Intervention for Individuals with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

This doctoral seminar provides students with advanced training in the application of best-practices assessment and treatment of behaviors evoked by depression, anxiety, and other related mental health disorders in children, adolescents and young adults. This advanced course uses a problem solving framework for assessing behavior, designing evidence-based interventions, and collecting data to document the effectiveness of interventions. Prerequisite: Open to matriculated PsyD in School Psychology students or with program permission only. Prerequisites:  SPY 601, 602, 604, 606, and 607. Cr 3.

SPY 740 Supervision in School Psychology

This doctoral seminar provides training in knowledge and skills pertaining to best practices clinical supervision within the field of School Psychology. Behavioral skills training and performance management strategies will be featured as models for increasing clinical skills of supervisees. Students will review supervision standards established by the National Association of School Psychologists, the American Psychological Association, the Maine Department of Education, and the Maine Board of Examiners of Psychologists. Readings, discussions, and case examples will be used to develop competencies. Students will also (a) conduct a self-assessment of professional competencies in School psychology (e.g., assessment, collaborative problem solving consultation, clinical interventions, evaluating the efficacy of interventions) and (b) use the self-assessment data to design an individualized professional development plan to guide pre-doctoral internship goals, objectives, and learning experiences. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated PsyD in School Psychology students preparing for internship within a year or with program permission. Cr 3.

SPY 751 Directed Study in Clinical Research

This course provides an opportunity for directed study in the clinical research techniques appropriate for educational and clinical settings. Students will select a research topic that advances current knowledge in the field of school psychology and promotes children’s academic, social, emotional, or behavioral success within school or clinical settings. Students will conduct a comprehensive literature review, identify a clinically relevant research question, design a research methodology and data analysis plan, prepare hypothesized results, and defend their proposal. Prerequisites: Open to matriculated Psy.D. students who have successfully completed the Psy.D. Comprehensive Examination. Graded Pass/Fail.  Cr 3.

SPY 759 Dissertation in School Psychology

This course includes the activities necessary to implement, evaluate, and summarize a research project (dissertation) related to the field of school psychology.  After submitting a proposal for approval by the Institutional Review Board and obtaining informed consent from potential research participants, students will implement the research protocol, analyze the resulting data, develop a manuscript to report their findings, and publicly defend their work. Graded Pass/Fail.  Prerequisites: Open only to matriculated Psy.D. students who have successfully completed SPY 751. Cr 6 (may be repeated).

SPY 788 Pre-Doctoral Internship in School Psychology

The pre-doctoral internship is the culminating supervised field experience in school psychology. The pre-doctoral internship includes a planned sequence of educational and training experiences to promote students' development of professional-level competencies in the areas of assessment, intervention, consultation, supervision, and applied research. Students enrolled in the pre-doctoral internship complete 1,500-2,000 hours of work experience while receiving a minimum of 4 hours per week of field-based supervision, regular opportunities for peer interaction and support, and systematic formative and summative performance-based evaluations. Students complete a minimum of 750 hours of the pre-doctoral experience in school settings delivering psychological services to children and adolescents, and they complete all hours in educational or clinical settings that provide evidence-based psychological services. The experience may be completed on a full-time basis over one year (no less than 48 weeks) or on a half-time basis over two years (no more than 104 weeks). Prerequisites: Matriculation in the PsyD in School Psychology Program; successful completion of all required academic courses and the comprehensive exam; and permission of the instructor. Cr var. (total of 9 semester hours for the internship).