USM Winter

Browse Winter Courses

student studying with a laptop and dogPlease be aware of the following: a. Payment is due within five business days of registration.
b. Students can take a maximum of 4.5 credits.
c. Winter Session is December 16th-January 10th. There is an overlap with Fall semester finals at USM.  Please plan accordingly.
 

There are 2 ways to view USM Winter courses:

1. USM MaineStreet Class Search, which will provide course availability and class information. View the YouTube video below for a quick tutorial on how to use our Class Search.

2. For your convenience, an interactive course listing that provides faculty contact information and course description.

 

ABU 190 Spreadsheet & Problem Solving
Alice B Cash
An examination of problem-solving techniques using modern computer applications software. Primary focus is on the use of electronic spreadsheets as a problem-solving tool, including proper spreadsheet model design and the use of appropriate graphical representation of model results. Other computer problem-solving software is examined. Interpretation and effective communication of results, both written and oral, are practiced. Prerequisite: MAT 101 or equivalent proficiency and computer literacy.
3 credits.

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BUS 201 Personal Finance
Joel Gold
Primary emphasis is to teach students how to become more knowledgeable and independent over money matters. Topics such as obtaining financial aid, managing student loans, career and education planning, budgeting, credit cards, stock market investing, real estate and insurance will be covered. Upon completing the course, students will be on their way to making better money decisions. This course is open to all USM students. When taken by business or accounting majors, this course will give general elective credit.
3 credits.

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BUS 335 International Business
Robert S Heiser
Introduction to the global economy and the political and cultural environments of international business. Topics include financial, marketing, and human resource issues in international business. Prerequisites: ECO 101, ECO 102, and junior standing.
3 credits.

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CMS 330 Theories of Interpersonal Communication
Maureen Ebben
A study of the current thinking in interpersonal communication which emphasizes specific theories of human interaction. Students will be exposed to research in the interpersonal setting and will apply findings to their personal relationships. The course will help students foster effective traditional and nontraditional relationships with a variety of people. Prerequisites:  CMS 102 and CMS 103 .
3 credits.

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CMS 102 Introduction to Communicaiton
Russel Kivatisky
This course provides students with an overview and brief history of the field of communication, introduces them to theory development and the research process, and illustrates how communication theories can be applied to everyday life. Students will explore communication in a variety of contexts, including intrapersonal, organizational, intercultural, and mass communication. This course satisfies the Socio-Cultural Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.
3 credits.

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CMS 350 The Internet and Society
Leonard J Shedletsky
This course explores the worldwide network of computers linked to form a new medium of communication¿the Internet. Course content will include the computer as a tool of communication, and how the Internet influences communication in such ordinary areas of life as work, interpersonal relations, and education. Students must have access to the Internet to participate in this course.
3 credits.

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CON 219 Lifetime Physical Fitness and Wellness
Alicia C Trott
The primary emphasis of this course is to teach students how to take control of their personal health and lifestyle habits. Major areas will include nutrition/weight management, fitness training techniques, flexibility, coronary risk factor management, muscular strength/endurance, stress management, and other wellness-related topics. Class content will include readings, discussions, self-assessment activities, and development of personalized nutrition and physical activity plans.
3 credits.

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CON 270 Holistic Approach Reproductive Health
Allison S Gray
This course will enable the student to look critically at reproductive health options through the lifespan. Through readings, podcasts, PowerPoint presentations, and online discussions, we will weigh evidence related to alternative, complementary, and natural approaches to managing reproductive health issues. The course will follow a life span, growth and development approach. Course topics will include natural family planning methods, holistic contraception, infertility and pregnancy issues, holistic birth support skills, and holistic care of the newborn after birth. In addition, adult reproductive issues will be covered including menopause, erectile dysfunction, and sexuality in aging. The student will participate online via the discussion board, online quizzes, short essays, and complete an assignment to create a holistic teaching page related to a reproductive health topic.
3 credits.

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CON 313 Health in Later Years
Suzanne Fitzsimmons
This course is designed for students from diverse fields who are interested in health and aging. The population of older adults in the United States is growing at a rate that is unprecedented in American history and no matter what your career path this growth will impact you. Knowledge about illness, medications, physical activity, nutrition, sexuality, health care delivery, and death and dying will be presented. Students will obtain essential information needed to provide effective care for aging clients, patients, loved ones, and themselves. Community experiences may be required.  
3 credits.

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CRM 100 Introduction to Criminology
Dusan Bjelic
This course focuses on the nature of crime and on problems concerning its measurement and distribution. The course examines some of the popular images of crime in the media and elsewhere, the creation and utility of official and unofficial crime statistics, and theories about the causes of crime.  A grade of "C" or better is required in this course in order to continue in the major.

3 credits. 

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GEY 100 Volanoes, Earthquakes & Moving Plates
Mark T Swanson
An introduction to minerals, rocks, and the processes that have continually shaped the earth over hundreds of millions of years of geologic history. The course also explores how the movements of crustal plates generates earthquakes, volcanoes, continental rifting, sea floor spreading, subduction, and continental-scale mountain ranges. For core science course credit, registration in one of the following: GEY 101 or GEY 106 is required; concurrent registration is recommended.
3 credits. 

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GEY 101 Lab Experiences in Geology
Mark T Swanson
Weekly lab sessions will focus on the basic skills of mineral identification, rock classification, and interpretation of topographic and geologic maps. Field trips to local geologic sites of interest will help illustrate rock types and geologic processes that shape our world. Traditional map, compass, and modern GPS techniques will be utilized. For core science course credit, registration in one of the following: GEY 100, GEY 103, or GEY 105 is required; concurrent registration is recommended.
1 credit.

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HRD 200 Multicultural Human Development
Julie A Zink
This course introduces developmental theory and research that encompasses the entire lifespan. Emphasis will be on prenatal development through adolescence, with an overview of adult development. A multi-disciplinary and multicultural view of human development will be taken by examining theories from a socio-cultural context and in consideration of change as well as stability throughout the life cycle. The interaction of hereditary, environmental, and socio-cultural factors will be considered in studying physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development. Prerequisite:  Second semester freshmen or above; must have completed College Writing and EYE course.
3 credits.

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HTY 122 United States History 1800 to 1900
Adam M Tuchinsky
A thematic treatment of the nineteenth-century United States and its peoples. Chronological coverage of the nation's political, social, economic, intellectual, and institutional development provides the context for addressing the personalities and events of the country and its relations with the larger world.
3 credits.

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LCC 370 Toward a Global Ethics
Christy Hammer
This writing instruction course assists students in articulating and assessing their own values. It examines the range of ethical theories and positions and explores the influence of particular cultural ideologies on ethical beliefs. The course considers the ethical principles implied by democracy, sustainability, justice, and difference. It examines ethical issues and dilemmas faced by individuals, organizations, and nations while exploring personal and collective decision-making processes in a global context. Prerequisite: Core Area C.
4 credits

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LSH 340 Topics in the Humanities - The Internet and Society
Leonard Shedletsky
This course explores the worldwide network of computers linked to form a new medium of communication, the Internet. Course content will include the computer as a tool of communication, and how the Internet influences communication in such ordinary areas of life as work, interpersonal relations, and education. Students must have access to the Internet to participate in this course. May be repeated for credit.
3 credits.

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MAT 120 Introduction to Statistics
Abou El-Makarim A Aboueissa
An introduction to probability and statistics through lecture and lab. Particular topics include random variables and their distributions, methods of descriptive statistics, estimation and hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation. Prerequisite: successful completion of the University's college readiness requirement in mathematics. Please Note: This online course requires a proctored final examination.
4 credits.

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MAT 140 Pre-Calculus Mathematics
Laurie Woodman
A brief review of elementary algebra followed by a study of the algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Prerequisites: successful completion of the University's college readiness requirement in mathematics and two years of high school algebra or MAT 108. Please Note: This course requires a proctored final examination.
3 credits. 

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MUS 100 Music Appreciation and History
Michele Kaschub
A survey of music from the Gregorian chant to the modern times, covering musical practices of the renaissance, baroque, classical, romantic, and contemporary periods. Representative works by the outstanding composers of each period. Open to all students.
3 credits.

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MUS 110 Fundamentals of Music
Tom Parchman
A background study of concepts and skills essential to an intelligent reading of music. The development of natural music abilities through participating in singing, rhythmic activities, and instrumental work. An appreciation of music through awareness of basic structures. Open to all students.
3 credits.

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PHI 211 Media Ethics
Julien Murphy
In the information age, media play an increasingly large role in our lives. Our notion of living in a global society is largely shaped by media. What is responsible journalism? Does violent programming contribute to violence in America? What are professional ethics and how should they guide media practitioners? We will discuss these questions by examining key ethical values in media such as: privacy, confidentiality, truth telling, conflicts of interest, and social responsibility. We will also explore some fundamental issues in ethical theory such as: Why be ethical? What is ethics? How do ethical theories differ? What are the best ways to evaluate and apply ethical theories to media controversies today? The course is designed for majors in philosophy, media studies, and communication as well as other interested students.  The course satisfies the Ethical Inquiry, Social Responsibility and Citizenship requirement of the Core Curriculum. Prerequisite:  PHI 100-level or EYE course.
3 credits. 

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PHI 230 Philosophy of Religion
Derek A Michaud
Analysis of the nature of religious experience, knowledge, and language. Special attention given to problems, classical and contemporary, exhibited in religious experience and relevant to areas of common concern in the sciences, humanities, and philosophy. Prerequisite: any PHI 100-level course.
3 credits.

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REL 230 Philosophy of Religion

Derek A Michaud
Analysis of the nature of religious experience, knowledge, and language. Special attention given to problems, classical and contemporary, exhibited in religious experience and relevant to areas of common concern in the sciences, humanities, and philosophy. Prerequisite: any PHI 100-level course.
3 credits.

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RHF 118 Yoga
Amanda D Curtis Kezal
RHF courses are designed to provide education and skill development in a particular recreation or health/fitness activity. Because skill and/or fitness development are objectives in all RHF courses, students must attend and participate in class activities in order to pass. The Department reserves the right to request written medical clearance for participation in courses that require high intensity exercise.
1.5 credits.

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SOC 199 Topics in Sociology - Soc Networks & Value Diversity
Vincent Collom

This introductory course examines social networks and the causes, qualities, and consequences of those ties connecting us together. Students will be introduced to the major sociological theoriesof social networks and social capital. Issues of difference and diversity in our contemporary global society will be introduced and investigated in relation to social networks. Status differences shape our access to resources, our mobilization of social capital, and future status attainment. Thus, status differences are both a cause and a result of our social networks and social capital.
3 credits. 

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